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Posts Tagged ‘Grant Newsome’

#4 Michigan 49 – Penn State 10: Michigan defense smothers Penn State

Saturday, September 24th, 2016


um-d-vs-penn-state(Dustin Johnson)

On the first play of the game, Penn State quarterback Trace McSorley was sacked for a loss of two. On the second play, he completed a pass to tight end Mike Gisecki for one yard. On the third play, McSorley was sacked for a near safety by Chris Wormley. Unlike the start of last week’s game against Colorado, this game was over, basically, three plays in.

Michigan’s defense came to play from the opening whistle and Penn State never stood a chance. It set the tone from the start that it wasn’t Kent State. It wasn’t Pitt. It wasn’t Temple. And it certainly wasn’t a RichRod defense or a Brady Hoke defense. It was a Jim Harbaugh and Don Brown defense. It was a Michigan defense.

Jabrill Peppers damn near took the ensuing Penn State’s punt to the house. After beating the last defender he got tripped up at the 9-yard line. Michigan took advantage of the short field and never looked back.

um-psu_small-final
Final Stats
Michigan Penn State
Score 49 10
Record 4-0, 1-0 2-2, 0-1
Total Yards 515 191
Net Rushing Yards 326 70
Net Passing Yards 189 121
First Downs 25 12
Turnovers 0 2
Penalties-Yards 7-80 2-13
Punts-Yards 1-44 6-240
Time of Possession 35:49 24:11
Third Down Conversions 11-of-16 2-of-12
Fourth Down Conversions 2-of-4 2-of-3
Sacks By-Yards 6-27 0-0
Field Goals 0-for-0 1-for-1
PATs 7-for-7 1-for-1
Red Zone Scores-Chances 6-of-6 2-of-2
Red Zone Scores-TDs 6-of-6 1-of-2
Full Box Score

The first half was as thorough a beatdown of a Big Ten power program as one could get. Michigan led 28-0, sacked McSorely five times, outgained Penn State’s offense 259 yards to 50, converted 7-of-10 third downs and 2-of-3 fourth downs, and found the end zone on four of five possessions.

While four Penn State beat writers talked themselves into choosing James Franklin over Harbaugh if they were given the choice, the reality of the chasm that exists between the two head coaches was never more evident than on Penn State’s opening drive of the second half. Down 28-0 in the third quarter, facing 4th-and-goal from the Michigan two, Franklin sent his field goal team onto the field, called timeout to think about it, and sent them back out to kick the 19-yard field goal. The television cameras may have missed it, but Franklin was waving a white flag.

On Michigan’s next possession, Harbaugh faced a 4th-and-4 from the Penn State 28 and went for it, up 28-3. The conversion failed, but message was clear. Harbaugh plays to win.

Not content to simply win, Michigan flexed its muscle on the next drive, running the ball eight of nine times right through the Penn State defense. Chris Evans for 37. De’Veon Smith for eight. Ty Isaac for five. Karan Higdon for three. Evans for five. Smith for eight. Higdon for 11. Evans for three. Touchdown.

Penn State would add a touchdown at the beginning of the fourth, but Michigan added two more to double the point spread and improve to 4-0 on the season.

The Michigan offense racked up 515 total yards — 326 on the ground and 189 through the air — and the defense held Penn State to just 191 total yards. Wilton Speight completed 21-of-34 for 189 yards and a touchdown. Smith led Michigan with 111 yards on 8.9 yards per carry and a touchdown. Higdon gained 84 yards and scored two touchdowns, while Isaac finished with 74 yards and a score. Nine different Wolverines caught a pass, including freshman tight end Devin Asiasi, who caught the first touchdown of his career.

Linebacker Ben Gedeon led the Michigan defense with 11 tackles, 1.5 of which were behind the line of scrimmage. Maurice Hurst led the Wolverines with three tackles for loss. Hurst, Matt Godin, Chris Wormley, Chase Winovich, and Taco Charlton each recorded a sack, and Mike McCray picked off McSorley in the fourth quarter. Peppers finished with five tackles, but was unable to add to his Big Ten-leading 9.5 tackles for loss. Michigan held Saquon Barkley — who came in averaging 5.1 yards per carry — to just 59 yards rushing on 3.9 yards per carry.

At 4-0 overall and 1-0 in the Big Ten, Michigan will likely remain ranked fourth nationally and will face its toughest test to date next week when Wisconsin (4-0, 1-0) comes to town. The Badgers stunned Michigan State in East Lansing, 30-6 on Saturday.

Game Ball – Offense

Grant Newsome, Ben Braden, Mason Cole, Kyle Kalis, Erik Magnuson (326 rushing yards, no sacks allowed)
Michigan’s offensive line has been much maligned over the past few seasons, and although it’s not the big, mauling line Harbaugh wants just yet, it has made considerable progress from the days of negative rushing yards. Against Penn State on Saturday it was nearly flawless. It paved the way for Michigan’s backs to rush for 326 yards and six touchdowns and it didn’t allow a sack against a Penn State defense that entered the game with 10 in its first three games. Four different running backs rushed for more than 50 yards, five different backs scored touchdowns, and the Wolverines rushed for 6.7 yards per carry.

Previous
Week 1 – Chris Evans (8 carries, 112 yards, 2 touchdowns)
Week 2 — Wilton Speight (25-of-37 for 312 yards, 4 touchdowns)
Week 3 — Jake Butt (7 receptions for 87 yards)

Game Ball – Defense

Maurice Hurst (6 tackles, 3 solo, 3 tackles for loss, 1 sack)
Michigan’s defense was all over Penn State quarterback Trace McSorley and running back Saquon Barkley, but Hurst stood out the most. He seemed to be in the PSU backfield all afternoon, recording three tackles for loss and dropping McSorley once.

Previous
Week 1 – Mike McCray (9 tackles, 3.5 tackles for loss, 2 sacks, 1 forced fumble)
Week 2 — Rashan Gary (6 tackles, 2.5 tackles for loss, 0.5 sacks)
Week 3 — Jabrill Peppers (9 tackles, 3.5 TFL, 1 sack, 2 kick ret. for 81 yards, 4 punt ret. for 99 yards, 1 TD)

Predicting Michigan 2016: The offensive line

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016


Predicting Michgian 2016-OffensiveLine
Mason Cole(Melanie Maxwell, MLive.com)

Previous: Quarterbacks, Running Backs, Wide Receivers, Tight Ends

It’s not the most glamorous position on the football field, but no group will play a more important role than the offensive line for Michigan this season, especially with a new quarterback taking over and a heightened emphasis on running the ball.

Luckily for Michigan, it returns one of the most important qualities in an offensive line: experience. Four of the team’s five regular starters return for 2016 after Graham Glasgow was selected in the third round of the NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions.

The two unknowns heading into the offseason were who would take that fifth starting spot, and which reserves can step into a bigger rotational role.

Starting five

Four of Michigan’s five offensive linemen return after starting at least 12 games last season. The most solid, reliable player is fifth-year senior Kyle Kalis, who started all 13 games at right guard and elevated his play to near all-conference levels. Kalis has been a mainstay on the offensive line since his redshirt freshman season in 2013. Since settling in at right guard, Kalis has become a solid pass protector, but like much of the line, needs to take the next step to create the running game Jim Harbaugh envisions.

Grant Newsome played his way out of a redshirt as a true freshman in 2015 and now moves into the starting lineup (Melanie Maxwell, MLive.com)

Grant Newsome played his way out of a redshirt as a true freshman in 2015 and now moves into the starting lineup (Melanie Maxwell, MLive.com)

Fellow fifth-year senior Ben Braden takes up the other guard slot, coming off a breakout season in which he started 13 games and quietly put up some of the best performances on the line. Recruited as a tackle, Braden was hailed as a strong run blocker coming into Ann Arbor, but he’s done a nice job to date stopping the inside pass rush.

Both starting tackles return for the 2016 season, but with a bit of a twist. Fifth-year senior Erik Magnuson will lock down his familiar right tackle spot and be a major contributor on the line for a fourth straight season. He’s slowly turned himself into a strong edge blocker and enjoyed his best season under Harbaugh a year go.

But former starting left tackle Mason Cole will step into a new role for his junior year, though he’ll be just as crucial to this veteran line. After becoming Michigan’s first true freshman to start a season opener on the offensive line in 2014, Cole played left tackle in each of his first 25 games at Michigan. Now, he’ll step into Glasgow’s empty shoes as the starting center, a role he’s embraced this summer.

Michigan went through a disastrous period at center under Brady Hoke, struggling with the center-quarterback exchange, and at times, allowing defenders to get huge jumps off the snap. Cole will be critical in picking up the running game this season and shoring up the inside of the line. He’s a smart player and has the physical tools for a smooth transition, but Cole will be a player to watch when the Wolverines take the field Sept. 3.

Four starters down, and one question mark to go. The new kid at the starters’ table will be sophomore Grant Newsome, who takes over the vitally important left tackle position. Newsome is one of the best natural two-way blockers on the roster, coming into college as an excellent pass blocker and an able run blocker. He’s strong and explosive, but the key will be consistency and moving his feet off the edge on a play-by-play basis. Newsome will have his gaffs, like any young player, but as the season goes on, he’ll benefit from playing next to such an experienced group.

Projected Starters
Left Tackle Left Guard Center Right Guard Right Tackle
Grant Newsome Ben Braden Mason Cole Kyle Kalis Erik Magnuson
2015 Starts 1 13 13 13 12
Career Starts 1 25 25 29 24
Likely contributors

The starting five played a ton of snaps for Michigan last season, but there are a few returning players who contributed in the rotation. Perhaps the most seasoned backup, and a candidate for a starting role as a redshirt senior next year, is David Dawson. Dawson shared some time with Braden at left guard last season and held his own, especially in pass blocking. He’ll be an important depth guy in 2016.

Senior Patrick Kugler is in a similar situation, though his ceiling was much higher coming into Ann Arbor. The former five-star recruit played a backup role in 2015 and could provide some insurance if Cole struggles at center, which seems unlikely. Either way, the senior will play a role.

An interesting player to watch will be junior Juwann Bushell-Beatty, who played in only four games as a reserve lineman last season. The Paramus, N.J. native was just getting his feet wet last season, and passed his first college test. He might not take on a huge role this season, but look for Bushell-Beatty to make moves up the depth chart for 2017.

Ben Pliska played in two games last season, so his role could grow as a fifth-year senior in 2016. He can fill in at multiple positions on the line and gives Harbaugh another option if one of these contributors struggles or goes down with an injury.

Two linemen who didn’t play last season but should figure into the mix as redshirt freshmen are Nolan Ulizio and Jon Runyan. Both members of Harbaugh’s first recruiting class at Michigan, Ulizio and Runyan committed as three-star prospects. Ulizio fits the fits the typical Harbaugh bill — a smart, physical player who plays the position with a chip on his shoulder. Runyan is a little different, as he’s more of a quick, explosive lineman who may be a little undersized, but compensates with great technique. Expect both players to find a home in the rotation off the bench.

New faces

Michigan pulled in three new offensive line recruits in its elite 2016 class, led by Wisconsin’s finest, Ben Bredeson. That’s right, Harbaugh managed to pull a Wisconsin lineman away from the Badgers, and Bredeson is exactly what you’d expect from that ilk. One of the top offensive linemen in his class, Bredeson projects as a guard or tackle and could probably step into a bigger role if Michigan wasn’t so stacked with veteran lineman. Bredeson has decent size, but his value comes from his athleticism, which makes him an excellent run blocker. If he can bring his pass protection up to par, he’ll be a familiar face on the line over the next several years.

Harbaugh pulled another gem from the offensive line crop, snagging Michael Onwenu out of Cass Tech in Detroit. Onwenu is an absolutely enormous human who will play guard at over 350 pounds. He can pass block well for a big guy, but his specialty should be run blocking as he matures. It’s all power and strength with Onwenu, so his ability to learn the intricacies of the position will dictate his success at Michigan.

The third – and sometimes forgotten – man from this group is Stephen Spanellis, who committed to Michigan out of nowhere in January. Spanellis is just another big, strong lineman to add to the mix, joining the team at 6-feet-6 inches tall and around 300 pounds. He probably won’t play much of a role as a freshman, but the Baltimore native could factor in down the line.

Michigan also welcomed preferred walk-ons Anthony Kay, Carl Myers and Andrew Vastardis to the offensive line group.

Meet the rest

Greg Froelich: Senior, 6-2, 257, from Maplewood, N.J. (Deerfield Academy)
Greg Robinson: Freshman, 6-6, 290, from Hudson, Ohio (Hudson)

Predicting Michigan 2015: The offensive line

Thursday, August 13th, 2015


PredictingMichigan-OffensiveLine
Mason Cole(Melanie Maxwell, MLive)

Michigan’s passing game was severely flawed under head coach Brady Hoke, but perhaps the most concerning unit over the last few seasons was the offensive line.

Michigan, recently known for talented linemen like Jake Long and Taylor Lewan, bounced back from a disastrous 2013 season with a marginally better 2014. Michigan quarterbacks were sacked 27 times and the team rushed for an average of 4.6 yards per carry. The line wasn’t dominant, but with most of the core players returning, there’s certainly enough for new offensive line coach Tim Drevno to work with.

Here’s a look at Michigan’s offensive line unit heading into the 2015 season.

Probable starters

Kyle Kalis

Kyle Kalis looks to live up to his five-star hype this fall (247 Sports)

Michigan returns five offensive linemen who played a ton of snaps in 2014 and figure to make up most of the starting line to begin the upcoming season. At the head of the group, coming off a strong freshman season, is left tackle Mason Cole.

Cole became the first Michigan offensive lineman to start the season opener as a true freshman last August, doing so as Hoke’s left tackle. He started all twelve games and wasn’t overwhelmed in his first college season. The former Florida high school first-team all-state selection figures to be the rock of the offensive line and will hold down the left tackle spot, barring injury.

On the end opposite of Cole will likely be redshirt junior Erik Magnuson, who took a mini step back last season after starting seven games at guard in 2012. Magnuson is a solid run blocker, but the concern will be his ability to pass protect on the edge. At 6-foot-6 and nearly 300 pounds, Magnuson is strong enough to be a force for Michigan after an offseason working with Drevno and the new staff.

Kyle Kalis will likely nail down one of the two guard spots, probably on the right side, where he’s been featured most as a Wolverine. Kalis had a fantastic redshirt freshman season, but took a small step back in 2014. The former five-star recruit might be the most important lineman for the Wolverines as the coaching staff works toward his incredibly high ceiling.

Redshirt junior Ben Braden, who started all twelve games for Michigan, should take the other guard spot. Though he played in just two games through his first two years on campus, Braden won a starting job last fall and was solid throughout the season. He could definitely improve as a pass blocker heading into what figures to be his second full season, but Braden is strong in the creating for the run, which will be valuable in Jim Harbaugh’s offense.

Finally, Graham Glasgow will move to center and anchor this experienced offensive line, where he’s played on both sides throughout his career. Glasgow started the final 11 games of the season in 2014 after playing in all 13 games the previous year. Glasgow has been a staple on the line since midway through 2012, but a full-time switch to center will be one to keep an eye on. Glasgow played nine games at center in 2013, which was a disastrous season for Michigan’s pass protection. The 311-pound lineman is a strong inside blocker, but his adjustment to center will come with some bumps along the road.

Overall, Michigan’s starting offensive line should be strong and experienced, but its legacy will be written based on the ability to protect the quarterback. Denard Robinson and Devin Gardner weren’t the easiest quarterbacks to block for, but with a more conventional offensive scheme in place, Michigan fans will get a better look at what this line can really do.

Projected Starters
Left Tackle Left Guard Center Right Guard Right Tackle
Mason Cole Ben Braden Graham Glasgow Kyle Kalis Erik Magnuson
2014 Starts 12 12 11 7 5
Career Starts 12 12 24 16 13

Returning contributors

The offensive and defensive lines are the most important positions on the football field to build depth in. Elite offensive lines aren’t only identified by strong, durable starters, but also by a deep group of players who can step in a play meaningful snaps late in games.

Michigan doesn’t have many experienced players waiting in the wings behind the five starters mentioned above, but there’s a deep pool of talent to work with on the roster. One of the most interesting players to watch will be Patrick Kugler, a former five-star recruit who played only one game last season.

Kugler is only 6-foot-5, but he’s one of the more athletic linemen on the team and could fill in at any position on the line. That versatility will make Kugler a valuable backup option as any of the starters could need a blow during the game. Kugler could be an option to fill in at center if the Glasgow transition doesn’t go well.

Another versatile option behind Kugler is redshirt junior Blake Bars, who didn’t see the field in 2014. Bars was an all-state lineman as a senior at Montgomery Bell Academy in Tennessee and has the skillset to help out at an interior line position if needed.

Michigan could also get a boost from a trio of former four-star juniors who haven’t seen much of the field during their careers. David Dawson, who played in five games last year, is one of the few pass blocking specialist in the rotation and, as a result, has a good chance to make the regular rotation. Logan Tuley-Tillman and Chris Fox have only played in one game apiece, but could play a role, as they’re both huge and have raw talent.

The names on this list don’t jump off the page, but Harbaugh and Drevno certainly see a ton of potential in the backup offensive linemen. Barring a major injury on the starting line, these guys will spend another year adjusting to the college game by filling in and playing lesser roles when called upon.

New faces

The 2015 recruiting class brought three new faces to the offensive line. The most decorated of these recruits is Grant Newsome, a 6-foot-7 tackle out of New Jersey. Newsome is an explosive pass protector who could back up Magnuson at right tackle in a pinch. Though he’s one of the best linemen in the 2015 class, he’s a redshirt candidate behind Michigan’s experienced line.

The Wolverines also welcome three-stars Nolan Ulizio and Jon Runyan Jr. to the unit. Ulizio projects as a guard at the college level and Runyan could play anywhere on the interior line. Both guys are strong candidates to redshirt in 2015.

Meet the rest

Greg Froelich — junior, 6’2″, 270 from Maplewood, N.J. (Deerfield Academy)
Dan Samuelson — junior, 6’5″, 289 from Plymouth, Ind. (Plymouth)
Juwann Bushell-Beatty — sophomore, 6’6″, 319 from Paramus, N.J. (Paramus Catholic)
Ben Pliska — senior, 6’3″, 277 from Kirkland, Wash. (Lake Washington)

New in Blue: Offensive tackle Grant Newsome

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014


Grant Newsome

Grant Newsome – OT | 6-7, 290 | Lawrenceville, N.J. – The Lawrenceville School
ESPN: 4-star, #25 OT Rivals: 4-star, #21 OT 247: 4-star, #22 OT Scout: 4-star, #20 OT
Other top offers: Alabama, LSU, Ohio State, Michigan State, Penn State, S. Carolina, Wisconsin

On the heels of last week’s big announcement that USC running back Ty Isaac was transferring to Michigan, Brady Hoke picked up another big offensive talent in four-star offensive tackle Grant Newsome this morning. Despite holding offers from a number of major programs, including Alabama and LSU, Newsome narrowed his list down to two, Michigan and Penn State, and visited both last week. This morning, he tweeted a statement that announced that his decision had been made.

Newsome is ranked pretty similarly among the four recruiting services. All rate him a four-star and Scout ranks him the highest as the No. 20 offensive tackle, while ESPN has him the lowest at No. 25. As far as national rankings are concerned, 247 Sports ranks him the highest at No. 192, while Rivals has him at 199, Scout at 215 and ESPN at 235. They’re all pretty much in agreement about his size as well. Three of the four list him at 6’7″, while 247 has him an inch shorter. Rivals lists his weight as 280, but the other three have him at 290.

Scout lists Newsome’s strengths as explosion, feet, and size, and his areas for improvement as body control and balance, flexibility, and technique.

“Newsome is athletic, strong in pass protection and can get to the second level quickly in the running game,” wrote Scout’s Brian Dohn. “He is good drive blocking and does a nice job in pass protection. He has good length and is able to protect the edge, but does need to refine his technique. Newsome also gets to the second level quickly.”

Newsome is the second offensive lineman in Michigan’s 2015 class, joining Jon Runyan Jr., and is the seventh total commit in the class. With a heavy emphasis on recruiting linemen in the past few classes, Hoke will be able to give Newsome a redshirt and allow him to spend a couple of years learning the tricks of the trade before he’s thrown into action. That’s a good thing.

Michigan now has about eight scholarships remaining in the class, a number that could always go up between now and signing day, and should be set at offensive line.