photo Michigan-Display-Ad-728x90-Die-Hard-Fans-only_zpskcnarkrk.jpg  photo MampGB header 2015 v6_zpsdluogxnr.jpg

Posts Tagged ‘Keith Heitzman’

Bellomy, Heitzman to transfer from Michigan

Friday, January 30th, 2015


Bellomy-Heitzman

Four days after running back Justice Hayes announced his intention to transfer, new head coach Jim Harbaugh granted two more fifth-year seniors-to-be a release from the program. Quarterback Russell Bellomy and tight end Keith Heitzman both announced on Friday that they will seek a grad-year transfer to play out their final season of eligibility.

Bellomy appeared in six games during his four seasons at Michigan, completing 4-of-23 passes for 46 yards, no touchdowns, and four interceptions. The Arlington, Texas native entered the 2012 Nebraska game late in the second quarter in relief of an injured Denard Robinson and struggled to move the ball as the Wolverines lost 23-9. In that game — the most extensive action of his career — Bellomy completed just 3-of-16 passes for 38 yards and three interceptions while rushing five times for no yards.

He missed his junior season due to a torn ACL suffered in spring practice and came into the Penn State game last season for two series in relief of Devin Gardner. On those series, he went 0-of-2, but most importantly, didn’t make a mistake to take Michigan out of field goal range. Matt Wile kicked a 42-yard field goal to tie the game at 13 late in the third quarter.

Heitzman played in 36 games in three seasons after redshirting in 2011. As a redshirt freshman in 2012, he appeared in 12 games as a reserve defensive end, recording seven tackles, one for loss, and recovering a fumble. In 2013, Heitzman started seven games at defensive end and played in all 12, recording eight tackles and half of a tackle for loss. Last season, he moved to tight end and caught two passes for 32 yards and one touchdown, which came against Indiana.

Both Bellomy and Heitzman expect to receive their degree from the University of Michigan this spring before transferring. Neither has picked a destination yet, but both stressed their love and appreciation for Michigan in Instagram posts on Friday afternoon. We wish both the best wherever they end up.

Click here to read Bellomy’s Instagram post. Click here to read Heitzman’s Instagram post.

Stepping Up: Michigan 34 – Indiana 10

Saturday, November 1st, 2014


Drake Johnson vs Indiana(MGoBlue.com)

A day after Michigan president Mark Schlissel announced the resignation of athletic director Dave Brandon the Michigan football team tuned out the distractions and took care of business on the field. Beating Indiana hasn’t been a major accomplishment for decades, but needing to win three of their final four to gain bowl eligibility, Michigan got a big performance from an unlikely source to clear one hurdle with a 34-10 win over the Hoosiers.

UM-Indiana-small-final-FINAL
Final Stats
Michigan Indiana
Score 34 10
Record 4-5, 2-3 3-5, 0-4
Total Yards 404 191
Net Rushing Yards 184 167
Net Passing Yards 220 24
First Downs 20 10
Turnovers 1 2
Penalties-Yards 3-25 3-25
Punts-Yards 4-155 6-226
Time of Possession 33:35 26:25
Third Down Conversions 6-of-13 3-of-13
Fourth Down Conversions 0-of-0 0-of-1
Sacks By-Yards 2-14 1-2
Field Goals 2-for-2 1-for-2
PATs 4-for-4 1-for-1
Red Zone Scores-Chances 6-of-6 2-of-3
Full Box Score

Indiana gained a first down on its opening possession, but Michigan’s defense forced a punt. Devin Gardner connected with Devin Funchess for eight yards to start Michigan’s first possession, and three plays later found Amara Darboh for 34 yards to the Indiana 23. Michigan’s drive stalled and Matt Wile booted a 35 yard field goal to put the Wolverines ahead 3-0.

On the first play of Indiana’s ensuing possession, Tevin Coleman, who entered the game as the nation’s leading rusher, fumbled and Bryan Mone recovered at the Indiana 27. Michigan capitalized with a six-yard touchdown pass from Gardner to tight end Keith Heitzman.

Michigan got back on the scoreboard a couple drives later when Gardner hit Darboh for a 12-yard touchdown pass to complete a nine-play, 79-yard drive and give Michigan a 17-0 lead early in the second quarter.

After forcing another Indiana punt, Michigan got the ball back looking to put the Hoosiers away. But on 3rd-and-9, Gardner was intercepted by safety Chase Dutra, who returned it 39 yards to the Michigan 12. The Michigan defense held strong, forcing a 25-yard field goal attempt. Redshirt freshman kicker Griffin Oakes missed it and Michigan averted a swing in momentum.

Michigan opened the second half with a three-and-out and Indiana finally mounted a scoring drive, going 51 yards in 11 plays for a 38-yard field goal by Oakes to pull within 14.

Michigan’s offense punted back to Indiana, but on 3rd-and-5, Ryan Glasgow sacked freshman quarterback Zander Diamont, forcing a fumble and recovering it himself at the Indiana 20. Three plays later, Drake Johnson carried it in from 10 yards out to put Michigan ahead 24-3.

Indiana went three-and-out and Michigan strung together its longest drive of the season, marching 78 yards in 15 plays and eating up eight minutes of game clock. The drive stalled at the Indiana six, but Wile converted a 23-yard field goal.

Indiana finally reached the end zone with a three-yard touchdown run by D’Angelo Roberts that capped a nine-play, 75-yard drive. Diamont started the drive with a 35-yard run. Michigan recovered Indiana’s onside kick attempt and Johnson ran for 32 yards and 16 yards for his second touchdown of the day, putting Michigan on top for the game’s final score of 34-10.

Johnson, who came in after De’Veon Smith got injured in the game, led all rushers with 122 yards and two touchdowns on 16 carries. Darboh had the best game of his career as well with nine catches and a touchdown for 107 yards. Funchess caught seven passes for 47 yards. Gardner finished 22-of-29 for 220 yards, two touchdowns, and one interception. It was Gardner’s highest passing total of the season and the first time this season Michigan has eclipsed 200 yards passing against a Power-5 team.

Diamont completed just 5-of-8 passes for 24 yards, while Coleman managed to crack 100 yards for the eighth time in as many games this season, finishing with 108 yards on 27 carries. Indiana’s 191 total yards and 24 passing yards were the fewest allowed by Michigan all season.

Jake Ryan led all defenders with 11 tackles including 10 solo stops and 2.5 tackles for loss, while Joe Bolden and Brennen Beyer each tallied a sack.

Michigan travels to Evanston, Ill. to take on Northwestern (3-5, 2-3) next Saturday. The Wildcats were throttled by Iowa 44-7 this week and are riding a three-game losing streak. With Ohio State looming at season’s end, Michigan must beat Northwestern to inch one step closer to bowl eligibility.

Predicting Michigan: The tight ends

Monday, June 23rd, 2014


Predicting Michigan-TightEnds

NCAA Football: Ohio State at Michigan

Michigan football made a few announcements this offseason that gutted the tight end depth for offensive coordinator Doug Nussmeier. The team’s top option throughout much of the last two seasons was Devin Funchess, who will be moved permanently to wide receiver for his junior season. Transitioning Funchess was much easier after the emergence of freshman Jake Butt, but a torn ACL sidelined the young star and left the Wolverines without their top two options at tight end, at least for the first few games of the season.

Brady Hoke opted against moving Funchess back to tight end, and will instead choose from a number of veteran options that have made smaller impacts during their Michigan careers.

The Starters

With the offense under construction after the hiring of Nussmeier, it remains to be seen what type of role the tight ends will play in 2014. During the spring game, the majority of Michigan’s sets featured one tight end, often junior A.J. Williams.

Williams played a very limited role in his sophomore campaign, catching just one pass for a two-yard touchdown in the loss at Iowa. The 6’6″ tight end started six games, but was rarely featured as an integral part of the offense. The junior will be asked to play a much bigger role in 2014, as he holds the No. 1 tight end spot on the depth chart and received the most reps during the spring game.

Fellow junior Keith Heitzman lineup up with Williams on the first team during double tight end sets at the spring game, revealing Nussmeier’s willingness to at least experiment with more than one tight end on the field.

Heitzman has played 23 games for the Wolverines in his career, but all of them have come on the defensive line. The 271-pound junior separated himself from the rest of the pack as the No. 2 tight end, but will likely be featured as a blocker and less of a receiving threat.

Butt, meanwhile, is expected to be out until Big Ten play, but when he returns, will slide back into a starting role. The 6’6″, 250-pound sophomore impressed as a true freshman in 2013, catching 20 passes for 235 yards and two touchdowns. That’s five more catches and one more yard than Funchess had in his freshman campaign. Butt saved his best performance of the season for the matchup against his hometown Buckeyes, recording five catches for 85 yards and a score. Butt won’t match Funchess’ 2013 numbers, but will play a major role in the offense once he returns.

Projected Stats – Williams
Receptions Yards YPC Long TDs YPG
9 100 11.1 1 7.7
Career Stats
2013 1 2 2.0 2 1 0.2
2012 0 0 N/A N/A 0 N/A
Totals 1 2 2.0 2 1 0.2
Projected Stats – Butt
Receptions Yards YPC Long TDs YPG
21 250 11.9 4 27.8
Career Stats
2013 20 235 11.8 37 2 18.1
Totals 20 235 11.8 37 2 18.1
Projected Stats – Heitzman
Receptions Yards YPC Long TDs YPG
16 200 12.5 2 15.4
Career Stats
2013 0 0 N/A N/A 0 N/A
2012 0 0 N/A N/A 0 N/A
2011 0 0 N/A N/A 0 N/A
Totals 0 0 N/A N/A 0 N/A

Veteran Depth

Tight end remains one of the thinnest positions on the Michigan roster leading into the 2014 season, but quality recruits over the past two seasons have provided the Wolverines with some talented options. The struggle for Nussmeier in 2014 will be finding a tight end that can both protect the quarterback and hurt defenses in the passing game.

Redshirt freshman Khalid Hill figures to be an option if Williams and Heitzman struggle, as the former consensus three-star offers Michigan more of a receiving weapon. Hill is smaller than the other tight ends, but makes up for it with quickness and essential receiving skills like strong hands and great route running. Hill is more likely to be a difference-maker in the future, but a strong spring could put him on the radar for 2014.

Projected Stats – Hill
Receptions Yards YPC Long TDs YPG
13 150 11.5 1 11.5
Career Stats
2013 0 0 N/A N/A 0 N/A
Totals 0 0 N/A N/A 0 N/A

Newcomers

Michigan welcomed one key tight end prospect in the 2014 recruiting class in Ian Bunting. Bunting is a tall, but athletic tight end that should evolve into Michigan’s top receiving threat from his position. The freshman played wide receiver throughout much of his high school career, which molded him into the offensive threat that Hoke recruited.

Bunting figures to compete for playing time as a true freshman, since the Wolverines could really use a receiving threat from the tight end position. His versatility can only improve his chances to crack the lineup, as Nussmeier owns the option to line him up in the slot or out wide.

If a largely unproven wide receiver unit struggles during the non-conference season, expect the coaching staff to consider awarding Bunting more time at tight end to give the offense more options. The freshman fits the mold of Funchess and Butt as a pseudo-receiver at tight end.

Projected Stats – Bunting
Receptions Yards YPC Long TDs YPG
10 150 15.0 1 11.5

Countdown to kickoff: 87 days

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014


Devin Funchess, Jake Butt

Countdown to kickoff: 92 days

Friday, May 30th, 2014


Countdown to kickoff-92_edited-2

Michigan-Central Michigan game preview

Friday, August 30th, 2013


Unlike last season’s opener, the national attention isn’t centered around Michigan’s game, but that doesn’t mean Brady Hoke will prepare any less for Central Michigan than he did for Alabama. As he said in his Monday press conference, it’s the fist chance to see where the team stands after a long offseason, with a new quarterback, and plenty of youth to go around.

After all, Central is the team that finished last season with four straight wins, the team that won its bowl game, the team that had the first overall pick in April’s NFL Draft, and the team that has a running back who has seven consecutive 100-yard rushing games. No other opponent on Michigan’s schedule can lay claim to more than one of those feats.

Quick Facts
Michigan Stadium – 3:30pm EST – Big Ten Network
Central Michigan Head Coach: Dan Enos (4th season)
Coaching Record: 13-24 (Overall and at CMU)
Offensive Coordinator: Mike Cummings (4th season)
Defensive Coordinator: Joe Tumpkin (4th season)
Returning Starters: 15 (8 offense, 7 defense)
Last Season: 7-6, 4-4 MAC (4th West)
Last Meeting: UM 41 – CMU 17 (2006)
All-Time Series: Michigan leads 3-0
Michigan vs. MAC: 31-1
Michigan in Season Openers: 109-21-3
Michigan in Home Openers: 110-18-2

The last time these two teams faced off was the second game of 2006 when Michigan won convincingly, 41-17. Coincidentally, that game preceded a matchup with Notre Dame, which Michigan also won.

But times are different. Michigan is on its second different coach than the one who won that game, Lloyd Carr, and has suffered its first ever defeat at the hands of a team from the Mid-American Conference. Alas, MAC teams can no longer be taken for granted. Or can they?

Central returns 15 starters and both specialists from last year’s 7-6 squad, but this is still a team that finished fourth in the MAC West. Yes, the Chips finished the season with four straight wins, but they came against Eastern Michigan, Miami (Ohio), UMass, and Western Kentucky – teams who finished with a combined record of 14-35. That sentence above about the claims to fame CMU carries into this game? Not looking so hot right now.

Let’s take a look at how the teams match up.

Michigan defense vs CMU offense: When Central Michigan has the ball

Eight starters return on offense, but the three that don’t are pretty big losses. As we discussed in Monday’s First Look, 99.6 percent of last year’s passing yards are gone with the departure of quarterback Ryan Radcliff. The man who represents the other 0.4 percent is junior Cody Kater who completed 2-of-4 passes for 12 yards last season. But he does have some college experience, albeit in a much smaller capacity. After spending a redshirt freshman season at Cincinnati, he transferred to Grand Rapids Community College, leading GRCC to an 11-0 record. Last season he transferred to CMU where he backed up Radcliff and now has won the opportunity to make his first every FBS start in the Big House.

At 6'2" Titus Davis will test Michigan's secondary (Tim Fitzgerald, CMU Athletics)

Another key departure was receiver Cody Wilson who finished second on the team with 840 receiving yards, which means Kater has one less proven target to throw to. The good news for him is the leading receiver, Titus Davis is back, and the 6-2, 190-pound junior from Wheaton, Ill. has big play ability. He averaged 20 yards per catch in 2012 with a long of 92 and caught eight touchdowns. He had a monster game against Western Michigan, catching 10 passes for 208 yards and a touchdown. Against a similar opponent, Michigan State, he caught four for 64 yards.

The third big loss from the CMU roster was left tackle Eric Fisher, who was the first pick in the NFL Draft. He helped pave the way for what was actually a mediocre running game, but a very talented running back. Zurlon Tipton rushed for 1,492 yards and 19 touchdowns, averaging 5.9 yards per carry. He surpassed 100 yards in each of the final seven games, including a 243-yards performance against Michigan’s Week 3 opponent, Akron. Against Michigan State, he rushed 11 times for 62 yards, and while he averaged 19.4 carries per game throughout the season, his workload went up to 25.3 in the final six games.

Central was a very balanced team last season in terms of plays run with 415 rushing attempts and 413 passing attempts, but the passing game was much more successful. That might not be the case this season with a new quarterback, however, Kater did complete 68.3 percent of his passes for 2,218 yards and 19 touchdowns for GRCC last season. Yes, quality of competition is a major caveat, but this isn’t simply a kid straight out of high school.

With questions about Michigan’s defensive line yet to be answered, look for Central to feed the ball to Tipton early and often. In that same vein, expect Michigan to gear up to stop the run, forcing Kater to try to beat them with his arm. The matchup with Blake Countess or Raymon Taylor on Titus Davis will be one to watch. Phil Steele put Davis among his top 25 receivers in college football and CMU receivers coach Mose Rison compares Davis to Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown. At 6-2, he’ll have a good four inches on any of Michigan’s corners.

Michigan offense vs Central Michigan defense: When Michigan has the ball

The Central Michigan defense is led by its duo of returning linebackers, Justin Cherocci and Shamari Benton, who combined for 258 tackles a year ago. Chrroci ranked 19th nationally with 132 and led the nation with 89 assisted tackles. Benton ranked 24th nationally with 126 and led the team with 54 solo tackles.

The line returns both on the interior, including sophomore Jabari Dean, who amassed 28 tackles, a sack, a forced fumble, and a fumble recovery as a freshman in 2012. Both ends have to be replaced, but Central got a transfer from Michigan State who will contribute right away. Senior Jeremy Gainer recorded 13 total tackles and two forced fumbles in 28 career games played for the Spartans, mostly on special teams, but he’ll be an instant upgrade for the Chippewas.

Shamari Benton forms a solid linebacking duo along with Justin Cherocci (CMU Athletics)

In the secondary, two starting corners and free safety Avery Cunningham are back, but the main guy who has to be replaced is All-MAC safety Jahleel Addae, who signed with the San Diego Chargers as an undrafted free agent. Cunningham tallied 88 tackles last season, while the other returnees, Jarret Chapman and Jason Wilson recorded 51 and 50, respectively. Wilson added a pair of interceptions.

The 4-2-5 defense that Enos runs relies on good play from the back seven, and that’s what they got last season. But the rush defense was the weak spot, giving up 192 yards per game, which ranked 93rd nationally. That means Michigan will feature a heavy dose of Fitzgerald Toussaint and the rest of his running mates.

However, Michigan State was a very run-heavy team in 2012 and only gained 173 yards on 4.2 yards per carry against CMU last September. Le’Veon Bell was held to 70, his third lowest output of the season behind Ohio State (45) and Michigan (68). Conversely, the Spartans torched Central’s secondary for 322 yards on 25-of-37 passing. It was quarterback Andrew Maxwell’s third-highest total of the season.

Central clearly doubled down on the run after seeing Bell run 44 times for 210 yards against Boise State the week before, and that allowed the Spartan passing game to go off. Expect similar results on Saturday, though Michigan’s offense figures to be a bit more balanced.

The other third: Special Teams

Kicker David Harman is gone, and the replacement hasn’t been named as of yet. Redshirt freshman Ron Coluzzi and sophomore Matt Cotiguala are battling it out. Senior punter Richie Hogan is back after finishing fourth in the MAC with a 41.8-yard average per punt. Titus Davis is the main man returning punts, while Courtney Williams will handle the kick return duties.

Prediction

Central will test Michigan’s defense with Tipton on the ground and Davis through the air, but don’t expect the Chips to hang around for more than a half. Michigan’s defense will flex its muscle, forcing Kater to try to beat it through the air. We’ll get a nice look at the ability of Frank Clark, Keith Heitzman, Chris Wormley, and Taco Charlton to get to the quarterback.

Offensively, Michigan will use a balanced attack, perhaps more balanced than Hoke would normally want in this type of game. The reason is that instead of simply running the ball at will against an inferior opponent, it will be important to work on the passing game with an unproven receiving corps (outside of Jeremy Gallon and Drew Dileo) before Notre Dame comes to town next weekend. Look for Gardner to give Jehu Chesson some targets to get him involved and see what he can do.

The Wolverines will put this one away by the third quarter and get Shane Morris, Derrick Green, and DeVeon Smith some playing time.

Michigan 41 – Central Michigan 17

Predicting Michigan: The defensive line

Monday, August 19th, 2013


As we continue our position preview and prediction series, it’s time to move on to the defensive side of the ball. If you missed the offense, we looked at the quarterbacks, running backs, wide receivers, offensive line, and tight ends over the past couple of weeks.

Shouldering The Load: A Critical Group

Since Greg Mattison has taken over as Defensive Coordinator, his unit has turned into one of the top in the Big Ten. A demoralized defense that struggled under Rich Rodriguez was turned around immediately because of Mattison’s presence. This season, he will have to work with the young defensive players that have made up the strong recruiting classes the past few seasons. Leaders like Jordan Kovacs have graduated and it will be critical to establish new veteran leaders to help the rest of the defense mature.

Jibreel Black gives the line a proven vet to rotate in

Head Coach Brady Hoke coached the defensive line during his days under legendary Bo Schembechler, and he obviously still takes pride in that group of players as the head man. In 2013, the defensive line will be absolutely critical. Great defenses are those that can get pressure on opposing quarterbacks without blitzing linebackers or defensive backs. Michigan will need to get pressure from the pass rushers on the line to help a secondary that seems to have many questions at this point in the preseason.

Veterans: The Few

This season’s defensive line will be anchored by the few returning players that will likely play big minutes again this year. Frank Clark has had a nice camp and figures to play a bigger role on the line this season. He has played all over the field on defense during his time in Ann Arbor, but this year he will play predominantly at defensive end, where Hoke expects him to be an effective pass rusher and leader. Perhaps the most satisfying play of the entire 2012 season for the Wolverines was Clark’s hit on Braxton Miller when he came through untouched against the Buckeyes in Columbus. After that hit, it is unsurprising that Clark has been moved permanently to the defensive end position.

The interior line seemingly has more stability, as proven defensive tackles Quinton Washington and Jibreel Black return as candidates to start. Washington, a redshirt senior, was solid in 2012 recording 32 tackles but only one sack. He has been steady on defense since his move from offensive line midway in 2010 and will be crucial as one of the two seniors on the defensive line. Black, the other senior, was more of a big-play threat last season. Though he only had 20 total tackles, he recorded three sacks and five tackles for loss.

The only other upperclassman on the line is redshirt junior Richard Ash, who will be a role player at defensive tackle again this season. Players like Ash are crucial to having a strong line, because so many players contribute during the course of one game due to the number of substitutions in the trenches.

Career Stats – Clark
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF FR INT
25 19 16 35 2.0 9.5 1 1 1
Career Stats – Washington
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF FR INT
35 16 19 35 1.0 3.0 1 0 0
Career Stats – Black
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF FR INT
39 28 17 45 4.5 6.5 2 0 0
Career Stats – Ash
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF FR INT
9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Filling In: Talented Youth

While the rest of the defensive line is largely unproven coming into 2013, there is no doubt the talent is there. Two strong recruiting classes in a row have helped establish depth at an important defensive position for the Wolverines. Freshman Taco Charlton could be one of the most important players on the defense, because of his standout ability as a pass rusher. Most of the returning players on the defensive line were adequate run-stoppers last season, but there is definitely a hole in the pass-rushing department. Charlton was recruited to fill that gap, and will likely get a chance to rush the quarterback in some meaningful games this season. Hoke likes what the true freshman has shown midway through camp.

Big things are expected from Taco Charlton

Another exciting young player is sophomore Ondre Pipkins. Pipkins played in every game as a true freshman, so he could be considered a veteran on an otherwise inexperienced defensive unit. Though he didn’t start any games last year, Hoke and Mattison showed great trust in Pipkins by giving him meaningful minutes in every game of the season. This year, the sophomore has an opportunity to move up into a starting position at defensive tackle.

Tom Strobel did not see any playing time last year, as he was given a redshirt to mature. However, he was a highly-ranked recruit and could be right in the mix to play big minutes as well this season. The Ohio native has a big body and is strong in the run-blocking category which is a strength of this unit.

Fellow redshirt freshman Mario Ojemudia has caught Hoke’s attention during the offseason with his ability to jump snaps and get quick pressure on the quarterback. Ojemudia is a smaller defensive lineman, at 6’2″, but he uses that to his advantage as a quicker defender and can get around bigger offensive lineman because of that. He was given a redshirt to work on his size and strength, since that seems to be the one issue that could stop Ojemudia from being a star.

Henry Poggi and Chris Wormley were recruits that also created some buzz. Wormley is a big athlete who moves very well for a player of his size. In high school he showed incredible disengaging skills and was able to overpower his opponents the majority of the time. Poggi, who was recruited as a four-star out of Baltimore, Maryland, may be the victim of Michigan’s depth at defensive tackle and take a redshirt this season. Players like Washington, Black and Pipkins figure to receive most of the snaps at defensive tackle, so coaches may take the opportunity to let Poggi mature for a season.

Career Stats – Pipkins
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF FR INT
13 2 5 7 0 0.5 0 0 0
Career Stats – Ojemudia
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF FR INT
9 8 3 11 1.0 2.5 1 1 1

Depth: An Exciting Future

Having too many good players is a nice problem to have, and Michigan may have difficulty finding time for some very good young players this season because of the traffic jam on the defensive line. True freshman Maurice Hurst Jr. comes to Ann Arbor after being labeled a very talented recruit, and can help fill in at defensive line this year if Michigan needs him. It is likely that Hurst could get a redshirt along with Poggi, and we’ll see them make a major impact in a few years.

Keith Heitzman has played 12 games as a backup defensive end in his short career so far, and will continue to contribute this season, potentially winning a starting role.

Redshirt freshman Matt Godin will likely pick up a similar role this year. Godin is one of the bigger lineman on the team at 6’6″ and 280 pounds. Godin’s classmate Willie Henry is also a huge interior lineman, listed just over 300 pounds. These players will see playing time throughout the course of the season, and will need to be solid while they give the more well-known players a breather. Luckily, Hoke and Mattison are the right coaches to have around a defensive line with so much potential.

Career Stats – Heitzman
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF FR INT
12 2 5 7 0 1.0 0 1 0

Wrapping Up

Michigan’s defensive line is similar to many of the other groups on the 2013 team. Two outstanding recruiting classes have established important depth, and the few veteran players will need to be leaders to help those youngsters mature. Washington, Black and Clark will be the big name veterans on the line, but there’s a great chance that some of the newer players step up and make a name for themselves early as well. Fans in Ann Arbor should be excited to see players like Charlton and Pipkins play major minutes and cause havoc on the defensive line.

The rest of the defense has their own responsibility, but the line is the really crucial group to watch in 2013. If the young pass-rushers can keep quarterbacks from getting comfortable in the pocket, the rest of the defense should fall into place. Mattison will look to his defensive line to set the tone this season.

Meet Your 2011 Recruiting Class: The Defense

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011


Since defense has been historically bad the past couple of years, and was the downfall of Rodriguez and the ultimate reason for the hiring of Hoke and Mattison, we’ll meet the defensive commits first.

Defensive Line (3)
BRENNEN BEYER
Height: 6-4
Weight: 222
Hometown: Canton, Mich. (Plymouth)
Rivals Ranking: #16 Strongside Defensive End (4-star)
Scout Ranking: #12 Defensive End (4-star)
ESPN Ranking: #24 Defensive End, 79 rating (4-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Michigan State, Notre Dame, Northwestern, UCLA, Stanford
How He Fits In: Beyer doesn’t have the size or strength to compete right away, but could develop into a solid performer for Brady Hoke’s defense. His strengths are his quickness and initial burst, but at just 220 lbs., he will need a year or two to bulk up. He has a similar build coming out of high school as Purdue’s Ryan Kerrigan, who wasn’t highly rated, but developed into one of the best defensive ends in the nation. That’s a pretty high expectation, but I think he compares to current Wolverine Craig Roh.
CHRIS ROCK
Height: 6-5
Weight: 250
Hometown: Columbus, Ohio (DeSales)
Rivals Rank: #50 Strongside Defensive End (3-star)
Scout Rank: #70 Defensive End (3-star)
ESPN Rank: #34 Defensive End, 78 rating (3-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Notre Dame, Wisconsin, Pittsburgh, Nebraska, Stanford
How He Fits In: Rock has a big body and a good motor, but needs to add some strength for Big Ten competition. Not as highly-rated as Beyer, Rock gives depth to the defensive line and projects to redshirt next season and spend a year or two on special teams before pushing for playing time in his redshirt sophomore or junior season.
KEITH HEITZMAN
Height: 6-3
Weight: 237
Hometown: Hilliard, Ohio (Hilliard Davidson)
Rivals Rank: NR (3-star)
Scout Rank: #63 Tight End (3-star)
ESPN Rank: #157 Defensive End, 75 rating (3-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Vanderbilt, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Toledo
How He Fits In: Like Beyer and Rock, Heitzman needs to add some bulk and strength to be a Division 1 defensive end. He’s quick off the ball and may end up at tight end, which he also played in high school. Either way, he’s headed for a redshirt in 2011 and will contribute on special teams for a year or two before seeing meaningful action. He probably fits best at tight end, which is a position of need for Michigan when Kevin Koger graduates, but with Chris Barnett in the fold, Heitzman will probably at least start out on defense.
Linebackers (4)
ANTONIO POOLE
Height: 6-2
Weight: 210
Hometown: Cincinnati, Ohio (Winton Woods)
Rivals Ranking: #26 Outside Linebacker (3-star)
Scout Ranking: #13 Outside Linebacker (4-star)
ESPN Ranking: #41 Outside Linebacker, 78 rating (3-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Pittsburgh, Kentucky, Miami, Purdue, Kansas
How He Fits In: Poole was one of Hoke’s first commitments after he took over and could see the field early on given the lack of experience at the linebacker position. Jonas Mouton and Obi Ezeh (who lost his starting spot) are gone, and some scouts say Poole is ready to play immediately. He’s very athletic and a strong tackler, both of which are needed on Michigan’s defense. Poole has a chance to be a star for Michigan in the next few years.
DESMOND MORGAN
Height: 6-1
Weight: 225
Hometown: Holland, Mich. (West Ottowa)
Rivals Ranking: NR (3-star)
Scout Ranking: #42 Middle Linebacker (3-star)
ESPN Ranking: #24 Inside Linebacker, 78 rating (3-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Northwestern, Akron, Buffalo, Bowling Green
How He Fits In: Morgan is a very physical run-stopper with great instincts and lateral movement. He’s a little undersized right now, but that should change with a year or two in the weight room. He’s the type of guy that Ohio State always seems to find and turn into a solid Big Ten linebacker, a la A.J. Hawk or James Laurinaitis. He most likely won’t play right away, using a redshirt year and a special teams year to bulk up and learn the position at the college level. By his third season, he could push for playing time and become a good inside linebacker for the Wolverines.
KELLEN JONES
Height: 6-1
Weight: 209
Hometown: Houston, Texas (St. Pius X)
Rivals Ranking: #29 Inside Linebacker (3-star)
Scout Ranking: #12 Middle Linebacker (4-star)
ESPN Ranking: #35 Outside Linebacker, 79 rating (3-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Texas A&M, Arkansas, Stanford, Arizona, Baylor
How He Fits In: Jones is a fast, athletic linebacker that could play inside or outside, but will probably end up outside. He’s shown a great ability to get to the quarterback on blitzes and shed blocks, though at 6-1, 209, he could stand to put on some more bulk. Still, he could see playing time on special teams this season and challenge for a linebacker spot within a couple years.
FRANK CLARK
Height: 6-2
Weight: 210
Hometown: Cleveland, Ohio (Glenville)
Rivals Ranking: NR (3-star)
Scout Ranking: #33 Tight End (3-star)
ESPN Ranking: #83 Defensive End, 77 rating (3-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Michigan State, North Carolina
How He Fits In: Clark is a huge pick up for Hoke as he cut into Ohio State pipeline Cleveland Glenville. Although Ohio State wasn’t going hard after Clark, he opens the door to potential future recruits in Ted Ginn Sr.’s talent-rich program. Clark could play tight end or linebacker, but Hoke stated in today’s presser that he will play linebacker. Hoke compared Clark to Michigan’s last Glenville product, linebacker Pierre Woods, who played for the Wolverines in the early 2000s and currently plays for the Buffalo Bills.
Defensive Backs (5)
BLAKE COUNTESS
Height: 5-10
Weight: 171
Hometown: Owings Mills, Md. (Our Lady of Good Counsel)
Rivals Ranking: #10 Cornerback, #133 Overall (4-star)
Scout Ranking: #20 Cornerback (4-star)
ESPN Ranking: #14 Cornerback, 80 rating (4-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Maryland, Georgia Tech, Louisville, N.C. State, Virginia
How He Fits In: Countess is one of the top pick-ups for this class and could have an immediate impact in a young and thin secondary that was the source of Michigan’s struggles last season. He’s a good cover corner with good hips and won’t shy away from a hit. He’s still a bit thin at 171 pounds and could probably use a redshirt year to add some strength. He has the potential to be a very good cover corner for Michigan.
RAYMON TAYLOR
Height: 5-10
Weight: 167
Hometown: Detroit, Mich. (Highland Park)
Rivals Ranking: #14 Athlete (4-star)
Scout Ranking: #49 Cornerback (3-star)
ESPN Ranking: #95 Athlete, 77 rating (3-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Indiana, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Cincinnati
How He Fits In: The recruiting analysts differ as to how good Taylor actually is and what position he fits best. He could end up as a slot receiver, but will most likely jump into Michigan’s secondary. He’s a great athlete with the speed and toughness to be a good corner, but like most of the other commitments needs to add some strength before he’s ready to cover the Big Ten’s best receivers. He could play instantly as a return man, however.
GREG BROWN
Height: 5-10
Weight: 180
Hometown: Fremont, Ohio (Ross)
Rivals Ranking: NR (3-star)
Scout Ranking: #50 Cornerback (3-star)
ESPN Ranking: #35 Cornerback, 77 rating (3-star)
Chose Michigan Over: The only 2011 commit to enroll in Ann Arbor early, Brown probably has the best chance of seeing the field early in Michigan’s secondary. He’s already participating in winter workouts, so he will benefit from spending time around the rest of the team and the extra few months of bulking up. He should compete for the two-deep this season and become a starter within a couple years.
DELONTE HOLLOWELL
Height: 5-8
Weight: 162
Hometown: Detroit, Mich. (Cass Tech)
Rivals Ranking: #25 Cornerback (3-star)
Scout Ranking: #40 Cornerback (3-star)
ESPN Ranking: #15 Cornerback, 79 rating (4-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Alabama, Oregon, Michigan State, Central Michigan
How He Fits In: The recruiting sites seem to agree that if Hollowell had a little bit more size, he would be considered an elite corner. Scout says he has track speed and can play well in press coverage or off the line. Like Taylor, Carter, and Countess, he will likely redshirt and spend some time on special teams before working his way into the lineup.
TAMANI CARTER
Height: 6-0
Weight: 175
Hometown: Pickerington, Ohio (Pickerington)
Rivals Ranking: NR (3-star)
Scout Ranking: #103 Cornerback (3-star)
ESPN Ranking: #154 Athlete, 74 rating (2-star)
Chose Michigan Over: Minnesota, Iowa, Arizona, Stanford, Air Force
How He Fits In: Carter is probably the biggest project of the defensive back haul that Hoke pulled in, though he has the best size at six-feet. He’ll certainly redshirt this season and spend some time on special teams before competing for a spot. Don’t expect him to outperform Countess, Taylor, Brown, or Holloway, but he could become a decent supporting player in the secondary.

Overview

Hoke and his staff hit the recruiting trails hard in the two weeks between his hiring and National Signing Day. As he said in today’s presser, he personally visited all but two of the 20 commits. The class is defense-heavy, as it should be considering the state of Michigan’s defense the past couple seasons.

I feel like the three defensive ends are essentially the same player, as are most of the defensive backs, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Building depth is vital to the success of the defense in the coming years, as we saw this past season when Donovan Warren went to the NFL, Troy Woolfolk missed the season with injury, and J.T. Floyd missed half the season. The one position that was missed was defensive tackle. Tim Jernigan, who ended up at Florida State, would have been a huge pickup for the class, but it will have to be a position of focus for the 2012 class.

I’m most excited about Poole, Morgan, and Countess on this side of the ball. They’re probably best suited to become All-Conference contributors during their careers.

I’ll give the defense a C because, while it did fill needs for future depth, the highest-rated player was Countess, which ESPN rated #133 overall. Michigan wasn’t even a factor on National Signing Day for the ESPN 150. Some of that was due to the coaching swich, while some can be attributed to Michigan’s record. I believe that will change next season with Hoke and Mattison focusing on defense.

Tomorrow we’ll take a look at the offensive commitments.

Michigan’s 2011 Recruiting Class By the Numbers

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011


National Signing Day represents the final chapter of each football season and the last chance to talk about college football until spring ball begins at the end of March. This year’s Michigan class has seen its share of changes, decommitments, and surprises. When Rich Rodriguez was replaced by Brady Hoke on Jan. 11, the recruiting class took on a shift in focus from a spread offense to a traditional pro-style offense. That didn’t sit well with some, but the momentum of bringing back a “Michigan man” and then hiring defensive coordinator Greg Mattison led a resurgence that catapulted Michigan’s class into the top 25 (according to Rivals).

While National Signing Day didn’t have the drama for Michigan that it did last year, Hoke and his staff secured two new commitments on Wednesday to go along with the 18 who had previously pledged their commitments, giving the first-year head coach 20 new players to work with this season. The majority were either Rodriguez commitments or were being sought after by Rodriguez before he was fired. About half of them were secured by Hoke once he took over. Below is a breakdown by state and by position. In a separate post, we will take a look at each individual recruit and how he fits in at Michigan.

2011 Recruits by State


Ohio Michigan Texas Illinois Maryland Florida California
7 6 3 1 1 1 1
Greg Brown
DB
Fremont (Ross)
Justice Hayes
RB
Grand Blanc
Chris Barnett
TE
Hurst (L.D. Bell)
Chris Bryant
OL
Chicago (Simeon)
Blake Countess
DB
Owings Mills (Our Lady of Good Counsel)
Tony Posada
OL
Tampa (Plant)
Matt Wile
K
San Diego (Francis Parker)
Frank Clark
LB
Cleveland (Glenville)
Brennen Beyer
DE
Canton (Plymouth)
Russell Bellomy
QB
Arlington (Martin)
Antonio Poole
LB
Cincinnati (Winton Woods)
Raymon Taylor
ATH
Detroit (Highland Park)
Kellen Jones
LB
Houston (St. Pius X)
Chris Rock
DE
Columbus (DeSales)
Thomas Rawls
RB
Flint (Northern)
Jack Miller
OL
Perrysburg (St. John’s)
Delonte Hollowell, DB
Detroit (Cass Tech)
Tamani Carter
DB
Pickerington (Central)
Desmond Morgan
LB
Holland (West Ottowa)
Keith Heitzman
DE
Hilliard (Davidson)
2011 Recruits by Position
Quarterback (1) Russell Bellomy
Running Back (2) Justice Hayes, Thomas Rawls
Tight End (1) Chris Barnett
Offensive Line (3) Chris Bryant, Tony Posada, Jack Miller
Defensive End (3) Brennen Beyer, Chris Rock, Keith Heitzman
Linebacker (4) Frank Clark, Antonio Poole, Desmond Morgan, Kellen Jones
Defensive Back (5) Blake Countess, Raymon Taylor, Greg Brown, Delonte Hollowell, Tamani Carter
Kicker (1) Matt Wile

* The class has an average star rating of 3.25 according to Rivals.
* Rivals ranks Michigan’s class 21st, while neither Scout or ESPN ranks the class in their Top 25.
* The six commitments from the state of Michigan are the most in a single class since 2005.
* Defensive back Greg Brown is the only commit to enroll at Michigan early. He’s currently participating in winter workouts with the team.
* Frank Clark comes from Ohio State pipeline Cleveland Glenville. He will be Michigan’s first player from Glenville since Pierre Woods committed in 2001. Coach Hoke compared Clark to Woods in today’s presser.
* If Matt Wile can prove consistent on field goals, he may be the most important commitment in the class and will start right away. He followed Hoke from San Diego to Ann Arbor.