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Posts Tagged ‘Khaleke Hudson’

Michigan 35 – Maryland 10: Michigan jumps out early, cruises to 25-point win

Sunday, November 12th, 2017


(Melanie Maxwell, The Ann Arbor News)

It wasn’t pretty and it teetered on the edge of too close for comfort in the third quarter, but Michigan still pulled out a 25-point road victory on Saturday afternoon, topping Maryland 35-10.

From the outset, Michigan appeared to be in total control, scoring touchdowns on three of their first five possessions to take a 28-0 second quarter lead. But after a missed 31-yard field goal by Quinn Nordin just before the half, Michigan fell into a funk that lasted well into the second half as Maryland pulled within 28-10. That was as close as they would get, however, as Michigan added a fourth quarter touchdown to put the game away.

Maryland native Henry Poggi got the scoring started with a 2-yard touchdown run on Michigan’s second possession of the game, capping a 9-play, 67-yard drive. Two possessions later, Michigan took control at their own 34 and Brandon Peters found Karan Higdon for a 35-yard screen play. A roughing the passer penalty tacked on an additional 15 yards and Chris Evans did the rest of the work with three straight 5-yard carries followed by a 1-yard touchdown run.

Final Stats
Michigan  Maryland
Score 35 10
Record 8-2 (5-2) 4-6 (2-5)
Total Yards 305 340
Net Rushing Yards 160 180
Net Passing Yards 145 160
First Downs 16 15
Turnovers 0 2
Penalties-Yards 1-10 7-59
Punts-Yards 5-212 5-152
Time of Possession 27:38 32:22
Third Down Conversions 4-of-11 3-of-16
Fourth Down Conversions 0-of-0 3-of-4
Sacks By-Yards 1-6 0-0
Field Goals 0-for-1 1-for-2
PATs 5-for-5 1-for-1
Red Zone Scores-Chances 4-of-6 2-of-3
Red Zone TDs-Chances 4-of-6 1-of-3
Full Box Score

Michigan’s defense forced a three-and-out, but instead of punting, Maryland tried a fake punt that gained just three of the needed seven yards, giving the Wolverines possession at the Maryland 33-yard line. Peters connected with tight end Zach Gentry on the first play for a 33-yard touchdown, putting Michigan ahead 21-0.

Once again Michigan’s defense shut down the Maryland offense, but this time Josh Metellus blocked it and Devin Gil recovered at the Maryland 19-yard line. A 16-yard Higdon run put Michigan at the three and Peters hit his other tight end, Sean McKeon, for a 3-yard touchdown pass.

Trailing 28-0, Maryland offensive coordinator Walt Bell reached into his bag of tricks to put together a promising drive that covered 69 yards on 11 plays and got to the Michigan 9-yard line. On 3rd-and-goal from the 10, David Long intercepted quarterback Ryan Brand and returned it 80 yards to the Maryland 20. But the Michigan offense went three-and-out, and Quinn Nordin pushed a 31-yard field goal right.

At the half, Michigan had held Maryland’s offense to just 97 yards on 37 plays. Maybe it was because the game was well in hand against an inferior opponent or maybe it was a case of a young team losing focus on the road, but Michigan seemed to come out flat in the second half and nearly let the Terrapins back into the game.

On Maryland’s second possession of the half, they got into Michigan territory, but missed a 43-yard field goal. On their next possession, they drive 85 yards on 11 plays and got to the Michigan 1-yard line before settling for a 20-yard field goal. On their next possession, they went 75 yards on 11 plays and finally found the end zone with a Brand-to-Taivon Jacobs touchdown pass.

In the first 20 minutes of the second half, Maryland had outgained Michigan 218 yards to just 21. Michigan’s three third-quarter possessions went three plays for four yards and a punt, four plays for 15 yards and a punt, and three plays for two yards and a punt.

But Michigan found success with their first possession of the fourth quarter, driving 65 yards in eight plays, capped off by a 17-yard Chris Evans touchdown run to reach the final score of 35-10. Last week’s defensive star, Khaleke Hudson, ended Maryland’s hopes of any type of comeback by picking off Brand and returning it 22 yards to the Maryland 19 and Michigan’s offense ran out the clock.

A pure look at the box score without seeing the final score would suggest a closely-fought game as Maryland outgained Michigan 340 to 305 and held the ball for 32:22 to Michigan’s 27:38. But Michigan was in control from the beginning, utilizing great field position to jump out to a 28-0 lead before letting off the gas. The Wolverines’ average starting field position in the first half was their own 49-yard line, meaning that they didn’t have to go far to score.

Peters went 9-of-18 for 145 yards and two touchdowns. More importantly, for the third consecutive game, he didn’t turn the ball over. He also didn’t get sacked. Evans led the way on the ground with 90 yards and two touchdowns, averaging 5.3 yards per carry, while Higdon gained 50 yards on 5.0 yards per carry before going out in the third quarter with an ankle injury. Gentry led Michigan through the air with three receptions for 63 yards and a score, while Higdon added another 48 receiving yards.

Defensively, Tyree Kinnel led the team with 10 tackles. Maurice Hurst was close behind with nine and also tallied Michigan’s lone sack on the day. Chase Winovich added three tackles for loss while Hudson and Long each had an interception.

Now 8-2 overall and 5-2 in Big Ten play, Michigan travels to Madison, Wisc. for a showdown with the unbeaten Wisconsin Badgers next Saturday. Wisconsin will likely be ranked in the top five nationally when Tuesday’s College Football Playoff rankings are released and ESPN’s College GameDay has already announced that it will be broadcasting live from Madison. Like last month in State College, it’s a great opportunity for Michigan to secure a big win, but it will take a much more complete effort that the Wolverines put forth this weekend.

Game Ball – Offense

Chris Evans (15 carries for 80 yards and 2 touchdowns, 2 receptions for 29 yards)
Evans earns his first solo game ball of the season after sharing it with Karan Higdon last week. He’s now the third different Michigan running back to earn a solo offensive game ball this season, joining Higdon (Week 5 and 6) and Ty Isaac (Week 2). Evans didn’t bust a long run like he did a week ago, but again displayed the shifty running style makes him hard to bring down in the open field, averaging 5.3 yards per carry and scoring two touchdowns. In addition to 80 yards on the ground, he added 29 yards on two receptions including a 20-yarder. He totaled four explosive plays for the game, three on the ground and one through the air.

Previous:
Week 1 – Quinn Nordin (4-of-6 field goals, 2-of-3 from 50-plus)
Week 2 — Ty Isaac (20 carries for 133 yards, 6.7 yards per carry)
Week 3 — Donovan Peoples-Jones (2 receptions for 52 yards, 2 punt returns for 104 yards and 1 touchdown)
Week 4 — John O’Korn (18-of-26 for 270 yards, 1 touchdown, 1 interception, 5 rushes for 12 yards)
Week 5 — Karan Higdon (12 carries for 65 yards, 5.4 yards per carry, 2 receptions for 33 yards)
Week 6 — Karan Higdon (25 carries for 200 yards, 3 touchdowns, 8.0 yards per carry)
Week 7 — None
Week 8 — Brandon Peters (10-of-14 for 124 yards and 1 touchdown)
Week 9 — Karan Higdon (16 carries for 200 yards and 2 touchdowns) & Chris Evans (18 carries for 193 yards and 2 touchdowns)

Game Ball – Defense

David Long (4 tackles — 3 solo — 1 pass breakup, 1 interception returned 80 yards)
Long didn’t have the best stats in the box score, but made a big impact in the game. For starters, he picked off quarterback Ryan Brand and returned it 80 yards, nearly breaking Tom Harmon’s program record for longest interception return. But more than that, he shut down the Big Ten’s leading receiver, D.J. Moore, who came into the game averaging 91.1 yards and 6.6 receptions per game. Long held him to his second lowest output of the season with five receptions for just 37 yards.

Previous:
Week 1 – Devin Bush (7 tackles, 5 solo, 3 tackles for loss, 2 sacks)
Week 2 – Tyree Kinnel (9 tackles, 8 solo, 1 tackle for loss, 1 sack, 1 interception return for touchdown)
Week 3 – Chase Winovich (9 tackles – 3 solo – 2 tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks, 1 quarterback hurry)
Week 4 — Chase Winovich (6 tackles — all solo — 4 tackles for loss, 3 sacks
Week 5 — Maurice Hurst (8 tackles — 6 solo — 2.5 tackles for loss)
Week 6 — Rashan Gary (7 tackles — 3 solo — 2.5 tackles for loss, 1 sack, 2 quarterback hurries)
Week 7 — Khaleke Hudson (4 tackles — 4 solo — 1 tackle for loss, 1 quarterback hurry, 1 pass breakup)
Week 8 — Maurice Hurst (8 tacles — 2 solo — 2 tackles for loss, 1 sack)
Week 9 — Khaleke Hudson (13 tackles — 11 solo — 7.5 tackles for loss, 2 sacks, 1 forced fumble)

First Look: Maryland

Thursday, November 9th, 2017


(umterps.com)

Brandon Peters got the start of his career, but last Saturday was all about the running game and the defense. Karan Higdon and Chris Evans combined for 391 rushing yards and four touchdowns, while Khaleke Hudson set a Michigan and Big Ten single-game record with eight tackles for loss, matching the NCAA record. The Wolverines will look to carry that momentum into College Park, Md. when they face Maryland this Saturday afternoon. Here’s a look at how the two teams compare so far this season.

Maryland & Michigan team stats comparison
Offense Defense
Average Rank Average Rank Average Rank Average Rank
29.9 55th 27.1 73rd PPG 36.3 115th 17.1 11th
1,553 1,918 Rush Yds 1,573 923
172.6 56th 213.1 29th Rush/Gm 174.8 77th 102.6 7th
4.5 5.0 Rush Avg 4.5 3.0
1,480 1,507 Pass Yds 2,330 1,285
164.4 114th 167.4 111th Pass/Gm 258.9 104th 142.8 1st
3,033 3,425 Total Off. 3,903 2,208
337.0 112th 380.6 85th Total Off./Gm 433.7 101st 245.3 3rd
24.2 22nd 20.0 86th KR Avg 20.0 53rd 14.6 3rd
12.6 17th 8.2 57th PR Avg 11.7 108th 7.7 75th
27:27 108th 32:57 13th Avg TOP 32:33 27:03
32% 115th 33% 113th 3rd Down% 50% 127th 24% 3rd
24-124 108th 27-187 111th Sacks-Yds 15-75 88th 32-227 3rd
36 29 TDs 43 19
6-10 (60%) 14-18 (78%) FG-ATT 9-16 (56%) 7-11 (64%)
25-32 (78%) 97th 25-27 (93%) 13th Red Zone 32-37 (86%) 86th 17-20 (85%) 75th
20-32 (63%) 14-27 (52%)  RZ TD 28-37 (76%) 13-20 (65%)
2.39 48th 2.31 52nd OFEI/DFEI 2.82 107th 1.40 15th
26.8 73rd 28.6 58th S&P+ 29.7 88th 19.5 13th

If you thought Minnesota was bad last week, Maryland is even worse — statistically at least. Yes, Maryland beat Minnesota 31-24 to open Big Ten play, but they seem to have gotten worse as the season has progressed, dropping four of their last five and five of their last seven. The only wins in that span have come over Indiana (42-39) and Minnesota. Last week, they lost to Rutgers.

The offense is fairly similar to Michigan’s with a decent running game and virtually no passing game. It ranks 55th nationally in scoring (29.9 points per game), 56th in rushing (172.6 yards per game), 114th in passing (164.4 yards per game), and 112th in total offense (337.0 yards per game).

The Terrapins rushed for over 260 yards in three of their first four games, tallying 263 against Texas in the opener, 367 against Towson, and 262 against Minnesota. But UCF held them to just 42 yards on 37 carries in Week 2. Ohio State and Northwestern also held the Terps’ running game in check, combining for just 135 yards on 73 carries (1.8 yards per carry).

The passing game hasn’t topped 255 yards in a game all season and has failed to reach 175 yards in six of nine games. Against Ohio State, Maryland completed just 3-of-13 passes for 16 yards and it wasn’t because the running game was working so well. The Terps managed just 66 total yards that game.

Defensively, Maryland is one of the worst in college football. D.J. Durkin’s defense ranks 115th nationally in scoring (36.3 points per game), 77th against the run (174.8 yards per game), 104th against the pass (258.9 yards per game), and 101st in total defense (433.7 yards per game).

UCF, Ohio State, Northwestern, Wisconsin, and Rutgers all rushed for over 200 yards against Maryland. Three of those (UCF, OSU, and Wisconsin) have fairly similarly-ranked running games as Michigan, while Rutgers and Northwestern rank 62nd and 96th, respectively. Opponents are averaging 4.5 yards per carry.

The passing game is even worse. Much worse. Maryland is allowing almost twice as many passing yards per game as Michigan and that’s an improvement after holding Rutgers to 107 passing yards last Saturday, although “holding” may not be the right word as the Scarlet Knights threw just 18 passes and found plenty of success on the ground. Indiana passed for 410 yards and Ohio State for 303.

One of the big reasons Rutgers’ defense is so bad is that it hasn’t been able to get off the field on third downs, allowing opponents to convert 50 percent of the time. They rank ahead of only Oregon State and Eastern Carolina in that category. By comparison, Michigan’s defense allows just a 24 percent conversion rate, meaning that they get off the field twice as often as Maryland’s defense does.

Another figure that bodes well for Michigan in this one is that Maryland has given up 24 sacks this season, an average of 2.7 per game. It’s three less than Michigan’s line has allowed and that’s good news for a Wolverine defense that ranks third nationally with 32 sacks. In the past two weeks, Michigan has faced offenses that entered that game allowing a total of 14 sacks all season, and the Wolverines got to the quarterbacks 10 times themselves — five each game.

Last week’s craziness with Iowa toppling Ohio State and Michigan State taking down Penn State brought an outside shot at at least a share of the Big Ten East title into play. With Wisconsin and Ohio State looming the next two weeks, Saturday’s game at Maryland is Michigan’s best shot at another win, so expect them to take full advantage of it.

Michigan 33 – Minnesota 10: Higdon, Evans run all over Gophers as Michigan retains Jug

Monday, November 6th, 2017


(Patrick Barron)

Redshirt freshman Brandon Peters got his first start, but he didn’t have to do much but hand the ball off as Karan Higdon and Chris Evans stole the show, rushing for 393 yards and four touchdowns in a 33-10 win over Minnesota.

Final Stats
Michigan  Minnesota
Score 33 10
Record 7-2 (4-2) 4-5 (1-4)
Total Yards 427 164
Net Rushing Yards 371 90
Net Passing Yards 56 74
First Downs 14 13
Turnovers 0 1
Penalties-Yards 9-85 3-10
Punts-Yards 5-204 8-388
Time of Possession 27:35 32:25
Third Down Conversions 4-of-11 4-of-13
Fourth Down Conversions 0-of-0 0-of-0
Sacks By-Yards 5-46 3-23
Field Goals 0-for-1 1-for-1
PATs 3-for-4 1-for-1
Red Zone Scores-Chances 2-of-2 2-of-2
Red Zone TDs-Chances 2-of-2 1-of-2
Full Box Score

Storms that swept through the Midwest postponed the start of the game, but in front of a mostly packed Big House Higdon and Evans gave Minnesota a dose of thunder and lightning. The pair became the first duo in Michigan history to rush for at least 191 yards in the same game and Higdon became the first Wolverine to top 200 yards in a game twice in a season since Mike Hart did so three times in 2004.

Higdon wasted no time getting the party started, taking Michigan’s second play of the game 47 yards to set up a 20-yard screen pass from Peters to tight end Sean McKeon for a touchdown. After a Minnesota touchdown, Higdon took the second play of Michigan’s second possession 77 yards for a touchdown.

Two drives later, Evans got in on the action with an 18-yard run followed by a 60-yard touchdown run to put Michigan ahead 20-7.

It took Michigan a while to get going in the second half, but on their third possession of the third quarter, Higdon scored his second touchdown of the game, this time from five yards out to cap a 9-play, 46-yard drive.

The defense forced a three-and-out and Evans raced 67 yards on the first play of the ensuing possession for another touchdown.

The fourth quarter was all smooth sailing for the Wolverines and fourth-string quarterback Alex Malzone even got to lead a possession. Minnesota tacked on a garbage time field goal to reach the games’ final score of 33-10.

All told, Michigan rushed for 371 yards, sacks included, the second straight big rushing week for the Wolverines. They piled up 334 yards on the ground against Rutgers last week.

Higdon finished with 200 yards and two touchdowns on 16 carries (12.5 yards per carry), while Evans tallied 193 yards and two scores on 13 carries (14.7 yards per carry). Peters completed eight of 13 passes for 56 yards and a touchdown. McKeon caught three passes for 30 yards and a score.

Defensively, Michigan held Minnesota to just 164 total yards, 90 on the ground and 74 through the air. But after having a little bit of success early on, the Gophers managed just 36 yards on 28 plays in the second half. Running back Rodney Smith, who rushed for nearly 1,200 yards in 2016, managed just 38 yards on 18 carries (2.1 yards per carry). Sophomore linebacker Khaleke Hudson led Michigan with 13 tackles (11 solo), 7.5 tackles for loss, two sacks, and a force fumble.

Next week, Michigan hits the road to face Maryland (4-5, 2-4) in a 12:30 kickoff on Big Ten Network.

Game Ball – Offense

Karan Higdon (16 carries for 200 yards and 2 touchdowns) & Chris Evans (18 carries for 193 yards and two touchdowns)
Higdon gets the nod for the third time this season after notching his second 200-yard rushing game of the season. The sophomore has established himself as the lead back in a crowded backfield the past few weeks, averaging 150.8 yards per game with eight touchdowns in the past month. He’s now fourth in the Big Ten in rushing, just 60 yards behind Saquon Barkley on 33 fewer carries, and ranks second in rushing touchdowns behind Wisconsin’s Jonathan Taylor.

Not to be outdone, Evans, who most assumed would be the breakout back this season after a promising freshman campaign, had his best game of the season, nearly matching Higdon’s big night. Evans had touchdown runs of 60 and 67 and averaged 14.7 yards per carry. It was the first time this season he has topped 100 yards.

Previous:
Week 1 – Quinn Nordin (4-of-6 field goals, 2-of-3 from 50-plus)
Week 2 — Ty Isaac (20 carries for 133 yards, 6.7 yards per carry)
Week 3 — Donovan Peoples-Jones (2 receptions for 52 yards, 2 punt returns for 104 yards and 1 touchdown)
Week 4 — John O’Korn (18-of-26 for 270 yards, 1 touchdown, 1 interception, 5 rushes for 12 yards)
Week 5 — Karan Higdon (12 carries for 65 yards, 5.4 yards per carry, 2 receptions for 33 yards)
Week 6 — Karan Higdon (25 carries for 200 yards, 3 touchdowns, 8.0 yards per carry)
Week 7 — None
Week 8 — Brandon Peters (10-of-14 for 124 yards and 1 touchdown)

Game Ball – Defense

Khaleke Hudson (13 tackles — 11 solo — 7.5 tackles for loss, 2 sacks, 1 forced fumble)
For the second time in three weeks Khaleke Hudson takes the defensive game ball. The sophomore was all over the field on Saturday night, harassing Minnesota ball carries in the backfield and sacking quarterback Demry Croft twice. He forced a fumble and set a school record with 7.5 tackles for loss. That performance catapulted him to the top of the Big Ten in tackles for loss and that game all by itself would have nearly been enough to put him in the top 20 in the conference.

Previous:
Week 1 – Devin Bush (7 tackles, 5 solo, 3 tackles for loss, 2 sacks)
Week 2 – Tyree Kinnel (9 tackles, 8 solo, 1 tackle for loss, 1 sack, 1 interception return for touchdown)
Week 3 – Chase Winovich (9 tackles – 3 solo – 2 tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks, 1 quarterback hurry)
Week 4 — Chase Winovich (6 tackles — all solo — 4 tackles for loss, 3 sacks
Week 5 — Maurice Hurst (8 tackles — 6 solo — 2.5 tackles for loss)
Week 6 — Rashan Gary (7 tackles — 3 solo — 2.5 tackles for loss, 1 sack, 2 quarterback hurries)
Week 7 — Khaleke Hudson (4 tackles — 4 solo — 1 tackle for loss, 1 quarterback hurry, 1 pass breakup)
Week 8 — Maurice Hurst (8 tacles — 2 solo — 2 tackles for loss, 1 sack)

#2 Penn State 42 – #19 Michigan 13: Hapless Michigan outplayed, outcoached in State College

Sunday, October 22nd, 2017


(Patrick Barron)

Michigan entered Saturday night’s matchup with No. 2 Penn State with a chance to make a statement in front of a Beaver Stadium whiteout and a primetime national television audience. They did make a statement, but not the kind they wanted, falling 42-13 and dropping out of the Top 25.

Final Stats
Michigan  Penn State
Score 13 42
Record 5-2 (2-2) 7-0 (4-0)
Total Yards 269 506
Net Rushing Yards 103 224
Net Passing Yards 166 282
First Downs 16 25
Turnovers 1 1
Penalties-Yards 6-59 1-10
Punts-Yards 6-233 2-99
Time of Possession 32:56 27:04
Third Down Conversions 6-of-16 4-of-7
Fourth Down Conversions 2-of-4 0-of-1
Sacks By-Yards 2-11 7-49
Field Goals 0-for-0 0-for-0
PATs 1-for-2 6-for-6
Red Zone Scores-Chances 2-of-2 4-of-5
Red Zone TDs-Chances 2-of-2 4-of-5
Full Box Score

It was all Penn State from the outset as the Nittany Lions scored touchdowns on each of their first two drives while Michigan went three-and-out on their first two.

Heisman Trophy frontrunner Saquon Barkley didn’t waste any time making his statement, taking the game’s second play 69 yards for a touchdown. On Penn State’s second possession, it took just four plays to move 78 yards for another touchdown.

Michigan cornerback David Long intercepted Trace McSorley on Penn State’s third possession — which was threatening to score once again — and that allowed Michigan to show a little life. John O’Korn led a 11-play, 59-yard touchdown drive that was capped with a 1-yard Karan Higdon touchdown run. But freshman kicker Quinn Nordin, who was once committed to Penn State before flipping to Michigan, missed the extra point to a chorus of boos.

Michigan’s defense forced a three-and-out, but the offense wasn’t able to do anything. Penn State’s next possession stalled at the Michigan 33-yard line on a failed fourth-down conversion, and Michigan took advantage with a 8-play, 67-yard drive capped off by a 6-yard Ty Isaac touchdown run to pull within 14-13.

But it was all downhill from there. Penn State drove for another touchdown to take back the momentum just before the half and when Michigan couldn’t put points on the board on the first possession of the second half, Penn State put the nail in the coffin with a 9-play, 80-yard touchdown drive to go up 28-13. From there, the only drama was whether or not James Franklin would try to top the 49 points that Michigan hung on Penn State in Ann Arbor a year ago. They didn’t quite get there, but the damage was done.

Penn State gained 506 yards on a Michigan defense that was allowing just 223.8 yards per game. Penn State rushed for 224 yards on a rush defense that was allowing just 85.5 yards per game. Penn State scored 42 points on a defense that was giving up just 14.7. Barkley rushed for 108 yards and two touchdowns on 7.2 yards per carry and also caught three passes for 53 yards and a score. McSorely completed 17-of-26 passes for 282 yards and a touchdown and added 76 rushing yards and three touchdowns on 6.9 yards per carry.

Michigan, meanwhile, failed to top 20 points in regulation for the third straight week, managed just 269 total yards, and gave up seven sacks. O’Korn went 16-of-28 for 166 yards but failed to throw a touchdown pass for the third straight game. Higdon rushed for 45 yards on just three yards per carry, while Grant Perry led the way in the air with three receptions for 46 yards.

It was an outcome that most expected, even die-hard Michigan fans, but the matter with which it happened was a worst-case scenario. And now it has a chorus of hot takes and Twitter crusaders calling for Jim Harbaugh’s head. It will die down a bit if Michigan can take care of business the next three weeks against Rutgers, Minnesota, and Maryland, but it won’t go away completely until he wins a big game. With Wisconsin and Ohio State scheduled to close the regular season, he’ll get that shot, but unless there is significant improvement between now and then, it’ll likely just turn up the noise.

Michigan returns home to face Rutgers (3-4, 2-2) next Saturday at noon. The game will be televised by Big Ten Network.

Game Ball – Offense

None
Higdon averaged just 3.0 yards per carry. Issac averaged 6.0 but got just six carries. O’Korn threw for just 166 yards with no touchdowns and was sacked seven times. Kekoa Crawford made a nice catch, but it was his only one. Donovan Peoples-Jones got involved in the passing game but dropped a bubble screen that had potential for a huge play. Eddie McDoom is probably the best candidate for this week’s game ball with three receptions for 29 yards and a rush for eight yards, but it didn’t have much impact on the game. The offensive line was horrendous. So no game ball is being given out on offense this week.

Previous:
Week 1 – Quinn Nordin (4-of-6 field goals, 2-of-3 from 50-plus)
Week 2 — Ty Isaac (20 carries for 133 yards, 6.7 yards per carry)
Week 3 — Donovan Peoples-Jones (2 receptions for 52 yards, 2 punt returns for 104 yards and 1 touchdown)
Week 4 — John O’Korn (18-of-26 for 270 yards, 1 touchdown, 1 interception, 5 rushes for 12 yards)
Week 5 — Karan Higdon (12 carries for 65 yards, 5.4 yards per carry, 2 receptions for 33 yards)
Week 6 — Karan Higdon (25 carries for 200 yards, 3 touchdowns, 8.0 yards per carry)

Game Ball – Defense

Khaleke Hudson (7 tackles — 4 solo — 1 tackles for loss, 1 quarterback hurry, 1 pass breakup)
Michigan’s defense had its worst game of the season defensively as Penn State offensive coordinator Joe Moorhead did a great job of picking on matchups where the Nittany Lions had advantages. That mostly involved getting Barkley matched up with linebacker Mike McCray who couldn’t keep up, but it also involved utilizing slot receivers against Michigan’s safeties. Hudson certainly wasn’t perfect himself, but he made his impact felt with a tackle for loss and a pass breakup that was nearly an interception in the end zone early in the game.

Previous:
Week 1 – Devin Bush (7 tackles, 5 solo, 3 tackles for loss, 2 sacks)
Week 2 – Tyree Kinnel (9 tackles, 8 solo, 1 tackle for loss, 1 sack, 1 interception return for touchdown)
Week 3 – Chase Winovich (9 tackles – 3 solo – 2 tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks, 1 quarterback hurry)
Week 4 — Chase Winovich (6 tackles — all solo — 4 tackles for loss, 3 sacks
Week 5 — Maurice Hurst (8 tackles — 6 solo — 2.5 tackles for loss)
Week 6 — Rashan Gary (7 tackles — 3 solo — 2.5 tackles for loss, 1 sack, 2 quarterback hurries)

#8 Michigan 36 – Cincinnati 14: Pair of pick-sixes save lackluster offensive showing

Sunday, September 10th, 2017


(Kirthmon F. Dozier, Detroit Free Press)

After a resounding win over 17th-ranked Florida to open the season, Michigan returned home and received more than it expected from a Cincinnati squad that went just 4-8 a year ago. Still, the Wolverines weathered the storm and survived a plague of mistakes to win going away, 36-14.

Michigan started the game strong with a 7-play, 80-yard touchdown drive on the first possession and an interception returned for touchdown a couple drives later to take a quick 14-0 lead.

Final Stats
Michigan  Cincinnati
Score 36 14
Record 2-0 1-1
Total Yards 414 200
Net Rushing Yards 193 68
Net Passing Yards 221 132
First Downs 16 13
Turnovers 2 2
Penalties-Yards 7-68 4-30
Punts-Yards 7-274 10-373
Time of Possession 30:27 29:33
Third Down Conversions 5-of-15 6-of-19
Fourth Down Conversions 1-of-1 0-of-1
Sacks By-Yards 4-23 1-8
Field Goals 2-for-2 0-for-1
PATs 4-for-4 2-for-2
Red Zone Scores-Chances 2-of-2 2-of-2
Full Box Score

But after the defense forced a Cincinnati punt, the ball hit a Michigan blocker and was recovered by the Bearcats at the Michigan 38. Cincinnati took advantage of the short field with a 9-play touchdown drive.

The second quarter struggles that Michigan had in Week 1 returned as the Wolverines kicked a 28-yard field goal on their first possession but managed just 51 yards on 14 plays the rest of the quarter.

Cincinnati opened the second half with a 10-play, 85-yard touchdown drive to pull within 17-14 and had two more possessions with a chance to either tie the game or take the lead. But the Michigan defense held strong, and after a pair of drives that gained a total of seven yards, the offense finally moved the ball thanks to a 36-yard pass from Wilton Speight to tight end Sean McKeon and a 33-yard touchdown pass to Grant Perry.

A couple drives later, Quinn Nordin kicked a 24-yard field goal to extend Michigan’s lead to 27-14, and on Cincinnati’s ensuing possession the Wolverines forced a three-and-out. On the punt attempt, the ball was snapped past the punter, who batted the ball out of the back of the end zone for a safety.

Michigan’s offense couldn’t capitalize, going three-and-out, but the defense scored its second touchdown of the game when Lavert Hill picked off quarterback Hayden Moore and raced 24 yards to the end zone to reach the final score of 36-14.

The Michigan offense was mistake prone and lackluster most of the day, unable to string together consistent drives against a defense that ranked 72nd nationally a year ago. Sure, the Bearcats’ defense was full of returning starters and now coached by a defensive-minded head coach in Luke Fickell, but there’s no reasons a Michigan offense shouldn’t have more success moving the ball. Take away the two defensive touchdowns and the Wolverines managed just 22 points.

Still, the Wolverines’ defense was strong, holding the Bearcats to just 200 total yards and 68 rushing yards while recording seven tackles for loss and four sacks and scoring two defensive touchdowns. Through two games, the Michigan defense has scored three touchdowns — matching last season’s total — and allowed just two.

Speight completed 17-of-29 passes for 221 yards and two touchdowns. Ty Isaac topped 100 yards rushing for the second straight game, carrying the ball 20 times for 133 yards, while Chris Evans managed just 15 yards on five rushes. Kekoa Crawford led the way through the air, catching four passes for 83 yards and a touchdown, while Perry caught for for 66 and a score.

Tyree Kinnel led the defense with nine tackles (8 solo), a tackle for loss, a sack, and an interception returned for touchdown. Devin Bush had another strong game with seven tackles and a sack, while Khaleke Hudson recorded two sacks.

Game Ball – Offense

Ty Isaac (20 carries for 133 yards, 6.7 yards per carry)
Isaac could have taken the game ball in Week 1, but we gave it to Quinn Nordin for his multiple 50-yard field goal day. There’s no question Isaac was the best player on the field for Michigan’s offense in Week 2. While Chris Evans couldn’t find any running room, Isaac took the reigns and averaged 6.7 yards per carry. The senior now has 247 yards through two games, averaging 8.0 yards per carry, though he has yet to find the end zone.

Previous:
Week 1 – Quinn Nordin (4-of-6 field goals, 2-of-3 from 50-plus)

Game Ball – Defense

Tyree Kinnel (9 tackles — 8 solo — 1 tackles for loss, 1 sack, 1 interception returned for touchdown)
While the Michigan defense lost 10 of 11 starters from last season it still returned plenty of players with experience and Kinnel was one of them. Stepping into the starting safety spot in 2017 for the first time, Kinnel was impressive on Saturday, leading the team with nine tackles, recording a sack, and taking an interception 28 yards for a touchdown.

Previous:
Week 1 – (7 tackles, 5 solo, 3 tackles for loss, 2 sacks)

Predicting Michigan 2016: The secondary

Thursday, September 1st, 2016


Predicting Michgian 2016-SecondaryJourdan Lewis

Previous: Quarterbacks, Running Backs, Wide Receivers, Tight Ends, Offensive Line, Defensive Line, Linebackers

We’ll go from one extreme to the next as Michigan’s secondary couldn’t look more different than the linebackers heading into Jim Harbaugh’s second season as head coach.

While no starters returned in the linebacking core, Michigan returns a ton of its top talent in the secondary, including one of the best cornerbacks in the country and four other starters.

Returning starters:

Michigan’s secondary – and likely the entire defense – will be led by All-American cornerback Jourdan Lewis. Lewis returned to Michigan for his senior season after breaking out as one of the nation’s best cover corners in 2015. Lewis defended an incredible 20 passes in 13 games and picked off two passes. He locked down each team’s top receiver and figures to do so again this year, allowing Michigan’s other corners to take lesser assignments. There’s no better cornerback in the nation.

Safety Dymonte Thomas is a popular pick to break out this season (Mark Lomoglio, Icon Sportswire)

Safety Dymonte Thomas is a popular pick to break out this season (Mark Lomoglio, Icon Sportswire)

Beside Lewis will be senior cornerbacks Channing Stribling and Jeremy Clark. Stribling enjoyed his best season in 2015, breaking up three passes and grabbing two interceptions in 11 games. Stribling is a solid tackler and made strides in coverage last season. He should be the team’s second best player in coverage this year.

Clark had his ups and downs in 2015. While he finished the year with three passes defended and three interceptions, he left some opportunities out to dry and got burned a few times downfield. Clark will likely start the season as the team’s No. 3 cornerback, but he puts himself in more positions to force turnovers than Stribling. His high-risk, high-reward style will reap its rewards.

At safety, Michigan returns two strong veterans who enter their final season as Wolverines. Thanks to Brady Hoke’s decision not to use redshirts, Dymonte Thomas and Delano Hill are in their last year at Michigan.

Hill was excellent in 2015, starting eight games at safety and hitting his stride late in the Big Ten season. Hill broke out in a big way at Indiana, when he recorded 10 tackles and broke up Indiana’s attempt to tie the game at the goal line in overtime. Hill’s greatest attribute is his support in stopping the running game. He gets good reads and isn’t afraid to go up to the line to make stops.

His partner in crime, Thomas, is more of a pass defender. Thomas didn’t have any tackles for loss in his first three seasons, but he did break up seven passes in 2015. He’s a luxury for Michigan downfield, as he can provide help for Stribling and Clark over the top. The safety tandem complements each other in the run and pass game and Michigan will be in good hands in the secondary.

Career Stats – Lewis
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF PDef INT
38 79 29 108 1.0 5.0 1 28 4
Career Stats – Stribling
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF PDef INT
34 34 6 40 0.0 1.0 1 3 2
Career Stats – Clark
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF PDef INT
32 25 14 39 0.0 0.0 0 4 3
Career Stats – Thomas
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF PDef INT
34 41 17 58 0.0 0.0 1 7 0
Career Stats – Hill
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF PDef INT
33 47 20 67 0.0 2.5 1 2 0
Potential contributors:

Michigan has two redshirt freshmen who have a chance to contribute for the first time in 2016 after patrolling the sidelines last season. The first is Tyree Kinnel, a supremely talented safety out of Huber Heights, Ohio. Kinnel is another safety who provides great support in the running game. He’s a reliable tackler and athletic enough to make stops in space.

Keith Washington will be a player to watch at cornerback after committing to Michigan out of Prattville, Alabama. He might be the fastest player on the team, but his coverage skills will dictate whether or not he sees the field in 2016.

Career Stats – Kinnel
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF PDef INT
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Career Stats – Washington
Games Played Solo Assisted Total Tackles Sacks TFL FF PDef INT
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
New faces:

Cornerback isn’t a friendly position for true freshmen on contending teams, but Michigan did welcome some very good recruits to Ann Arbor. David Long projects as an elite cover corner and could probably contribute this season in a backup role or as an injury replacement. Long has all the tools to match up man-to-man with receivers: speed, quickness and very good anticipation. If he can learn the college game quickly, he’ll be an impact corner in the future.

Lavert Hill came to Michigan with even more buzz than Long, thanks to dominance at Detroit King High School and the long recruiting battle between Michigan and MSU. Hill is another very good coverage corner who can stick with receivers and break up passes. Unlike his brother (Delano Hill), he’s much more of a pass defender than a run stopper and his tackling will need some work at the college level.

Josh Metellus committed to Michigan with his teammates Devin Bush and Devin Gil, out of Charles W. Flanagan High School in Florida. Metellus is a solid safety who can step up and help stop opposing running games, but he probably isn’t ready for a major role in 2016.

The final commit in this group is Khaleke Hudson, who is listed at safety but could probably play anywhere on the defense short of defensive tackle. Hudson is an elite athlete who might be the closest thing the defense has to Jabrill Peppers’ versatility. Hudson will see the field this season because he is physically ready to play at the college level, but it’s hard to predict what role he’ll play. Since the team is deep in the secondary, he might see spot snaps as a linebacker or on offense. Either way, he’ll be a fun guy to watch.

Michigan also got a preferred walk-on commitment from three-star safety Tru Wilson, who turned down several scholarship offers to become a Wolverine. Wilson shouldn’t see any time as a true freshman, but he could work his way into the rotation down the road.

Finally, Tyler Cochran joined Michigan as a preferred walk-on safety from West Bloomfield, Michigan.

Meet the rest:

Louis Grodman: DB, sophomore, 5-11, 183, from Commerce, Mich. (Walled Lake Northern)
No career stats
Taylor Krupp: DB, sophomore, 6-1, 186, from New Lothrop, Mich. (New Lothrop)
No career stats
Brandon Watson: CB, junior, 5-11, 203, from Wilmington, Del. (Eastern Christian Academy)
12 games played, 2 solo tackles, 6 assisted tackles, 8 total tackles
Matt Mitchell: CB, junior, 5-10, 186, from Dexter, Mich. (Dexter)
No career stats
Anthony Dalimonte: S, senior, 5-9, 176, from Bloomfield Hills, Mich. (Brother Rice)
No career stats
Jacob West: S, sophomore, 6-0, 195, from Pinckney, Mich. (Pinckney)
No career stats
Jordan Glasgow: S, sophomore, 6-1, 210, from Aurora, Ill. (Marmion Academy)
No career stats

New in Blue: 2016 ATH/S Khaleke Hudson

Wednesday, January 27th, 2016


Khaleke Hudson(Justin K. Aller, Post-Gazette)

Khaleke Hudson – ATH | 5-11, 205 | McKeesport, Pa. – McKeesport
ESPN: 3-star, #86 S Rivals: 3-star, #26 ATH 247: 4-star, #15 S Scout: 4-star, #24 ATH
Other top offers: UCLA, Michigan State, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Pittsburgh, Penn State, UNC, WVU

Just hours after picking up a commitment from receiver Eddie McDoom, and just a week before National Signing Day, Jim Harbaugh added to his impressive 2016 recruiting class with a commitment from McKeesport, Pa. star Khaleke Hudson. The 5-foot-11, 205-pound safety/athlete chose Michigan over Penn State and West Virginia and announced it via Twitter on Wednesday afternoon.

Hudson is a three-star recruit according to ESPN and Rivals, but 247 and Scout gave him the extra fourth star. ESPN and 247 both rank him as a safety, while Rivals and Scout rank him as an athlete. ESPN ranks him the 86th-best safety in the class, but 247 is much higher at 15th. Meanwhile, Scout lists him as the 24th-best athlete and Rivals as the 26th-best. Scout and 247 are the only services that have Hudson ranked nationally. Scout has him 274th and 247 has him 318th.

After an impressive senior season, Michigan offered Hudson on Nov. 2, and then he had a standout performance at the Semper Fidelis Bowl in early January, according to 247 Sports analyst Alex Gleitman.

“The McKeesport product had a very solid game and even played both ways for the East team,” he said. “Defense is where he did most of his damage, though, recording 7 tackles, including 2 tackles for loss, as well as 1 forced fumble and 4 pass break-ups. He was very active throughout the game and looked good both in pursuit of the ball carrier and dropping back in coverage.”

Hudson officially visited Michigan the weekend of January 15 where he made up his mind to spend the next few years in Ann Arbor. In addition to Penn State and West Virginia, Hudson held offers from UCLA, Michigan State, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Pittsburgh, Virginia Tech, and North Carolina, among others.

Scout lists Hudson’s strengths as body control, closing speed, and durability, while noting his areas to improve as hip flexibility and jamming ability. Scout’s Brian Dohn expands on that.

“Hudson is being recruited as a running back and/or safety, and it is easy to see why schools are split. He has good burst and covers 10 yards in a flash. As a running back, he gets through the hole quickly. As a safety, he closes quickly. In both instances, he is physical and loves to put his shoulder into the play. He has good speed and instincts, but needs to add some flexibility.”

With such athleticism, Hudson could play any number of positions at Michigan, including safety, linebacker, or even running back, playing the Jabrill Peppers role. If he indeed sticks at safety, he fits the mold of a Harbaugh and Don Brown defense with his athleticism and physicality.