photo AnnArborGIFHeader_zps02670880.gif

Posts Tagged ‘Michigan Football’

Tailgate Tuesday: Pork loin with mustard glaze

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014


TailgateTuesday_banner-Week6

Tailgate Tuesday is our weekly collaboration with Joe from MmmGoBluBBQ. These will be posted each Tuesday throughout the season and each recipe will be themed around that week’s opponent. 

Previously: Hot-’n-Fast pulled pork with Carolina mustard slawIrish stout pepper beefSpatchcock RedHawk,Grilled Ravioli, Smoked “Land of 10,000 Lakes” Catfish.

While researching Rutgers and their most popular tailgating recipes, three common ingredients kept popping up: PORK……PORK……..and more PORK. Since I couldn’t get my hands on a New Jersey “Pork Roll”, I went with the next best thing. A delicious pork loin fit the bill for this week’s recipe. Yay PORK!!!!

Ingredients:

• 2-3-pound pork loin (not tenderloin)
• Basic BBQ rub (equal parts)
• Kosher salt
• White granulated sugar
• 
Dark chili powder
• 
Montreal steak seasoning
• 
A little cayenne or chipotle powder if you like some heat

Brine:

• 1 gallon HOT water
• 
1 cup kosher salt
• 
1 cup brown sugar

Mustard Brown Sugar Glaze:

• 1 cup brown sugar
• 
2 Tbsp flour
• 
2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
• 
1 tsp dry mustard

Directions:

Mix brine ingredients and stir until seasonings are dissolved. You may need to heat things up in the microwave or on the stove to get seasonings fully incorporated. Allow to cool. Submerge the pork loin in the brine and refrigerate for 12 – 24 hours. A large ziplock bag works great for this or you can use a food storage bucket as seen below. The brine is a great way to add some flavor and moisture to a great cut of meat. Feel free to add different seasonings to your brine. The only basics are water, salt and sugar.

Once the loin has been brined, it’s time to set up your smoker or grill for indirect heat. I decided to use my rotisserie for this cook, but it is not necessary. I just like playing with my BBQ toys whenever possible. Score the meat by cutting crossways 1/8 inch deep. This will add a little extra surface for our rub and create some extra crunchy bark. We all love some good bark. Leave the fat on the loin. Add a good amount of your BBQ rub and make sure it gets into the cracks of the loin. You can see the scored meat below. I went a little deeper than I planned on, but it still worked. If you are not using a rotisserie, just place the meat on the cool side of your grill.

Pork Loin 1-2

We are shooting for a smoker/grill temp of 275 – 300 degrees. Add some pecan or apple wood chunks (any fruit wood will do) to the lit coals and you are ready to go. We will likely be cooking this for about 90 minutes, depending on the overall size of your loin. We are done when we hit an internal temp of 144 degrees.

After about 45 minutes, you can see the pork start to sweat. This is also where the internal fat starts to breakdown and release some of our moisture. This is where the brine really helps. The loin has very little fat, so the added moisture is needed. Look at those tasty juices trying to escape. MMMmmmmmm…….

After about 70 minutes, my temp was nearing 140 degrees. I decided to make up a glaze to add another layer of flavor. Combine all four ingredients for the glaze and heat up. You can put the glaze in the grill/smoker for about 15 minutes and it will melt everything together. Once you get to 140 degrees, it’s time to brush on your glaze. Brush every few minutes until you reach 145 internal degrees. Remove from the heat and tent with foil for 15 minutes. This allows the juices to settle and keep things tender.

Pork Loin 3-4

After 15 minutes, it’s time to slice and enjoy. These make great sandwiches as well. Not a bad leftover sandwich when you settle in for the NFL games on Sunday. This is one of my favorites and could not be any easier. Don’t be afraid to cook your pork to MEDIUM. Even tho Betty Crocker of the 1950s recommends we cook our pork until it’s void of all moisture, 140 plus degrees is perfect for this cut. ENJOY!

Pork Loin 5-6

__________________________________________________________________________________________

This week’s drink: Detroit CoolerDetroit CoolerDetroit Cooler

Ingredients:

• 4 oz Vernors
• 2 oz vanilla vodka
• 
1/4 of an orange

Combine ingredients over ice and finish with a fresh squeeze of an orange wedge.

Thanks to www.sypsie.com for this great drink recipe. Very refreshing and incorporates our favorite Michigan drink. VERNORS.

For more great recipes, photos, and barbecue ideas, follow Joe on Twitter at @mmmgoblubbq. And don’t forget to check out his site, MmmGoBluBBQ, for recipes, product reviews, and more.

Five-Spot Challenge 2014: Rutgers

Monday, September 29th, 2014


Five-SpotChallenge_Banner1

First of all, sorry for making “Twitter handle” a mandatory field in last week’s Five-Spot Challenge. It was not intended to be, and won’t be in the future for those of you who don’t have Twitter.

Congratulations to first-time contestant GengIsKhan for winning despite a poor showing for the team on the field. GengIsKhan was the closest to predicting the yard line Michigan’s first drive would end. The Wolverines made it to just the 26-yard line and his prediction of 31 was just five away. He was also just four away from the combined uniform number(s) of Michigan’s first touchdown (4) with a prediction of eight (Shane Morris to Devin Funchess) and just six away from Funchess’ longest reception (14). For his win, GengIsKhan wins a $20 M Den gift card.

Season-long leader Kfarmer16 finished second last week, 34 points behind the winner, to maintain a narrow three-point lead the Week 4 winner, freezer566, who came in third this week. KashKaav was the only participant to correctly predict that De’Veon Smith would score Michigan’s first touchdown. Eight of the 22 contestants predicted Derrick Green, while four predicted Devin Gardner to Funchess. For question two, seven of the 22 contestants thought Michigan would score on its opening possession and only four were correct in predicting that Michigan wouldn’t make it past midfield.

Everyone underestimated David Cobb’s rushing yards (183). Bluwolf77 was the closest, just 48 away with his prediction of 135. Bigboyblue was the closest to Funchess’ longest reception (14 yards) with his prediction of 15. MEKMichigan‘s prediction of 17 was just three away. Finally, not a single contestant predicted that Michigan would not make a field goal. GengIsKhan was the closest with a prediction of 35 yards.

Only two contestants predicted a Minnesota win, but both of them predicted close Minnesota wins (23-20 and 28-27). The average score prediction was Michigan 27 – Minnesota 17.

The weekly results and overall standings have been updated.

Michigan travels to New Jersey this weekend for their first ever meeting with Rutgers. The game will be televised by Big Ten Network at 7 p.m. EST. Rutgers comes into the game with a 4-1 record, and like Michigan, is 0-1 in the Big Ten. The Scarlet Knights will be looking to pick up their first ever Big Ten victory.

Here are this week’s questions:

M&GB staff predictions: Minnesota

Friday, September 26th, 2014


StaffPicks_banner

Michigan enters Big Ten play 2-2 with losses against the only two power-five teams they’ve played. Minnesota comes to Ann Arbor 3-1 with wins over three cupcakes. Could the Gophers win for just the fourth time since 1968? Or will Michigan hold onto the Little Brown Jug for yet another year? Let’s take a look at our predictions.

Staff Predictions
Michigan Minnesota
Justin 24 13
Sam 23 10
Derick 28 24
Josh 24 21
Joe 28 26
M&GB Average 25 19

Justin: Both teams are going to look to run the ball. That’s pretty much all Minnesota does and they’ll look to get David Cobb and redshirt freshman quarterback Chris Streveler going. Michigan’s run defense has been its strength in the early going, having held the last three opponents under 100 yards. Look for Greg Mattison to load the box and force Streveler to pass.

Michigan’s offense will also look to feed Derrick Green often, especially if Shane Morris gets the start. Don’t expect the offense to open up for him, but he can have success against Minnesota’s pass defense than has allowed three of four opponents to throw for more than 250 yards.

I expect a boring, low-scoring game that Michigan wins comfortably, but not a blowout.

Michigan 24 – Minnesota 13

Sam: It only took until Rich Rodriguez’s third season at the helm of Michigan football to have fans speculate over who Michigan’s next head coach would be – despite a better record year-over-year. We are now early in Brady Hoke’s fourth year leading the Wolverines, but the widespread speculation over his impending firing has certainly begun – because of a worse record year-over-year and an increasingly inept offense.

After a dismal 26-10 loss against a Utah team that is probably not great and in which Michigan’s defense scored more points than its offense, the Wolverines find themselves standing at just 2-2 going into the first weekend of Big Ten play against lowly Minnesota. Is the Big Ten title still up for grabs? You bet. How are Michigan’s chances of reaching that goal? Maybe as good as Lloyd Christmas’s chances of ending up with Mary Swanson.

All signs point to a new starting quarterback tomorrow as Devin Gardner appears to be regressing, but Shane Morris has not shown much to-date. Minnesota is probably the worst team in the Big Ten, and they only managed to complete one pass last week, so Michigan should win, but I don’t think it will be pretty.

The first time Michigan reaches the red zone tomorrow (not to jinx it) would be the first time the Maize and Blue has gotten there against a real team all season. Unless the offense churns out 50 points, I’m ready to write the season off. Ultimately, though, I’ll take Michigan.

Michigan 23 – Minnesota 10

Derick: Michigan played one of its worst games since Brady Hoke took over as head coach Saturday, falling 26-10 to Utah at home. The team looked unprepared for a third straight week and is limping into the conference season opener against Minnesota.

The Little Brown Jug has been a staple in Schembechler Hall over the last decade, and Minnesota likely sees Saturday as its best chance in many years to bring the trophy back to Minneapolis. I think Michigan will have to really battle to fend off Minnesota, but will come away with a close win.

Michigan 28 – Minnesota 24

Josh: Coming into this season I had pretty low expectations (8-4) but after losses to Notre Dame and Utah yielded no offensive touchdowns and ZERO red zone trips I’ve all but checked out of football season (I wonder if John Beilein knows anything about developing football players). If the offense can’t even sniff the end zone against decent teams then the wheels have all but fallen off for Brady Hoke and crew. For now let’s enjoy Jabrill Peppers while we have him because he may very well bolt if (when) Hoke gets the boot.

Looking ahead at the schedule only two games pop out to me that can be chalked up as wins; Minnesota and Northwestern. Luckily for Michigan the Gophers are in town this weekend.

Minnesota can’t pass the ball to save their lives and while David Cobb is a very good running back, the run defense is the strength of Michigan’s defense. Sadly, defense is not the problem for Michigan. We’ll probably see Shane Morris starting at quarterback. While I like Devin Gardner, it is clearly time for a change, because he hasn’t progressed like he should have and his poor decisions have cost Michigan one too many games. I don’t see this one getting out of hand like most Minnesota games do (read: it won’t be a blowout) but I do think Michigan should be able to handle them. Then again I said that about Akron and UConn last year and they barely escaped, so who knows anymore.

Regardless of whether the quarterback is Morris or Gardner, I expect Nussmeier to keep the offense bare bones simple with some quick short throws and then pound the ball non-stop, with an occasional deep bomb off play-action to Devin Funchess. I’d be willing to bet Morris/Gardner still tosses a pick or two, and Minnesota will be in it far longer than the fans would care for. In the end I think Michigan will eek out a close one.

Michigan 24 – Minnesota 21

Joe: I could not be more confused heading into the Big Ten opener against the Golden Gophers. I have no idea who will be under center for this one. Although, I have a feeling we may witness the start of the Shane Morris show on Saturday with a compliment of Gardner out wide. Just a hunch. If this is the case, it will be Green followed by more Green followed by Funchess and a little more Green.

I want to see the offense spread things around a little more. It’s becoming very predictable once again and that is never good. If Michigan is able to get everyone involved and keep Minnesota guessing, they will be able to move the ball with some level of success. This will allow the defense to stay fresh and contain a very weak passing attack. The Michigan run defense has been solid but will have its hands full with David Cobb.  Keep an eye on their running quarterback as well.

This game has been fun to watch for the last few years and should be another close one. I will give it the ol’ college try and predict with absolutely no level of confidence a Michigan victory. Now where are my BBQ tongs?

Michigan 28 – Minneeeesota 26

Michigan-Minnesota game preview

Friday, September 26th, 2014


Game Preview_Minnesota_banner

Michigan limps into conference play with a 2-2 record, but as Brady Hoke has said over and over again in the last couple of weeks, the goal of a Big Ten championship is still within reach. A turnaround in conference play can erase the futility of the first four weeks of the season and get back the fans that jumped off the bandwagon. It all starts tomorrow when Minnesota comes to town looking to beat Michigan for just the fourth time since 1968.

UM-Minnesota-small-final
Quick Facts
Michigan Stadium – 3:30 p.m. EST – ABC
Minn. Head Coach: Jerry Kill (4th season)
Coaching Record: 147-95 overall (20-22 at Minn)
Offensive Coordinator: Matt Limegrover (4th season)
Defensive Coordinator: Tracy Claeys (4th season)
Returning Starters: 14 (7 offense, 7 defense)
Last Season: 8-5 (4-4 Big Ten)
Last Meeting: Michigan 42 – Minnesota 13 (2013)
All-Time Series: Michigan leads 73-24-3
Record at Mich Stadium Michigan leads 33-10-1
Last 10 Meetings: Michigan leads 9-1
Current Streak:  Michigan 6

Minnesota entered Jerry Kill’s fourth season on an upward swing, having gone from 3-9 to 6-7 to 8-5 the past three seasons. If they can improve their record again this fall — a tall order, to be sure — Kill will have done something that hasn’t been done since the 1940s — improve Minnesota’s record for three straight seasons. Minnesota’s legendary coach, Bernie Bierman, was the last to do it from 1945-48. Glen Mason had a chance to achieve the feat twice during his tenure, but each time fell back to earth. He did, however, reach 10 wins in 2003, and Kill will hope to parlay the momentum he has built into a similar outcome.

Kill got a nice vote of confidence in the offseason in the form of a new contract that bumps his salary up from $1 million per year to $2.3 million through 2018.

Minnesota enters Ann Arbor winners of three of their first four this season, the only loss a 30-7 defeat at the hands of TCU. The Gophers beat Eastern Illinois 42-20, Middle Tennessee 35-24, and San Jose State 24-7. Unlike Michigan, who has out-gained all four of its opponents offensively, Minnesota has actually been out-gained in three of its four games.

Michigan has had Minnesota’s number the last half century, winning the last six, 22 of the last 23, 30 of the last 32, and 41 of the last 46 since 1964. The Little Brown Jug basically lives in Ann Arbor these days, and even during Michigan’s 3-9 season in 2008, the Wolverines found a way to beat the Gophers. So how do the teams match up this season? Let’s take a look.

Michigan defense vs Minnesota offense: When Minnesota has the ball

Through the first four games, the Minnesota offense averages a field goal more per game than Michigan (27 points). The Gophers rank 104th in total offense (336 yards per game), 29th in rushing (236.2 yards per game), and 121st in passing (99.8 yards per game). The also rank 95th in third down conversions (37 percent) and 90th in red zone scores (10-of-13).

David Cobb is averaging 134.8 yards per game so far this season

David Cobb is averaging 134.8 yards per game so far this season

Senior David Cobb is one of the best running backs in the conference. Our former feature writer Drew Hallett ranked him seventh-best in his preseason Big Ten position rankings. He came out of nowhere to rush for 1,202 yards on 5.1 yards per carry in 2013, becoming the first Gopher to eclipse 1,000 yards since 2006. He was held to just 22 yards on seven carries against Michigan, but had six 100-yard games, including against Michigan State. So far this season, Cobb has been the Gopher offense, averaging 134.8 yards per game on the ground. But he has gained most of that yardage in just two of the four games — 220 yards against Middle Tennessee and 207 against San Jose State last week. TCU held him to just 41 yards on 15 carries in Week 3 and you can be sure Michigan will load the box to do the same.

Cobb is the workhorse with 92 carries, but three other running backs have double-digit carries. Berkley Edwards, the younger brother of former Michigan star receiver Braylon, has 16 carries for 92 yards and two touchdowns. Rodrick Williams and Donnell Kirkwood each have 10 carries for just 35 and 24 yards, respectively.

With last year’s starting quarterback, Phillip Nelson, gone the man who supplanted him by the end of 2013 was supposed to grab the reigns. Redshirt sophomore Mitch Leidner threw just 78 passes for 619 yards and three touchdowns last season. About a third of that came in the bowl game in which he completed 11-of-22 for 205 yards and two scores. He also saw extensive action against Michigan, completing 14-of-21 for 145 yards, a touchdown, and an interception. He was much more of a running quarterback last season, rushing 102 times for 407 yards and seven scores.

But after starting the first three games this season and completing just 48.1 percent of his passes for 362 yards, two touchdowns, and four interceptions, he missed last week’s game with turf toe. In his place was redshirt freshman Chris Streveler, who threw just seven passes and completed just one for seven yards. On the other hand, Streveler rushed 18 times for 161 yards and a touchdown. He’s likely to be the starter tomorrow.

The receiving corps is young, led by tight end Maxx WilliamsDrew’s second-best tight end in the conference this fall, who caught 25 passes for 417 yards and five touchdowns a year ago. Williams leads the team with six catches for 110 yards and two touchdowns so far, also missed last week’s game with an injury, but should play tomorrow. Last year’s leading wide receiver, Derrick Engel, is gone, leaving Donovahn Jones, K.J. Maye, and Drew Wolitarsky to step up. Jones has six catches for 92 yards and a score, while Maye has two for 65, and Wolitarsky has four for 31.

Experience isn’t an issue with the offensive line. Of the nine linemen that started a game last season, seven returned, and those seven started a combined 55 games in 2013 and 124 in their careers. Left guard Zac Epping is the most experienced of the bunch, having started 38 career games. While none of Minnesota’s linemen rank among the Big Ten’s best, and the line as a whole won’t be the best, it has paved the way for a powerful running game.

Michigan offense vs Minnesota defense: When Michigan has the ball

Defensively, Minnesota has allowed exactly the same number of points as Michigan has, 20.2 per game. The total defense ranks 66th nationally (383.8 yards per game), the rush defense ranks 51st (131.5 yards per game), and the pass defense ranks 82nd (252.2 yards per game). In addition, the Gophers are allowing opponents to convert 40 percent of their third downs, which ranks 72nd nationally. By comparison, Michigan allows 33 percent.

Linebacker Damien Wilson leads the team with 44 tackles

Linebacker Damien Wilson leads the team with 44 tackles

The main loss from last season is a big one in nose tackle Ra’Shede Hageman, who was drafted by the Atlanta Falcons in the second round of the NFL Draft. He led Minnesota with 13 tackles-for-loss in 2013 and also recorded two sacks. Defensive tackle Roland Johnson, who added 5.5 tackles-for-loss, also departed, leaving a big hole in the middle of the defense.

Senior Cameron Botticelli is now the main man in the middle and leads the team with 3.5 tackles for loss. He also has one sack. Nose tackle Steven Richardson has started the last two games and has eight tackles, 2.5 for loss, and one sack. The ends are redshirt junior Theiren Cockran, who ranked third in the Big Ten last season with 7.5 sacks, and senior Michael Amaefula, who recorded 19 tackles for loss a year ago. The two have combined for 12 tackles, three for loss, and a sack so far this season. Sophomore Hendrick Ekpe started the first two games and has 10 tackles, three for loss, and 1.5 sacks.

Two of the top three linebackers from last season are gone, but middle linebacker, senior Damien Wilson, returns. He was Minnesota’s second-leading tackler last season with 78, and had the third-most tackles-for-loss with 5.5. He currently leads the team with 44 tackles and also has three tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks, an interception, and a fumble recovery. Junior De’Vondre Campbell, who started three games last season, is the second leading tackler with 21 to go along with one tackle for loss. The Gophers have gone with more nickel the past two weeks, but when they use a third linebacker it is usually redshirt sophomore Jack Lynn, who is third on the team with 20 tackles and two for loss.

The strength of Minnesota’s defense was supposed to be the secondary, despite the loss of cornerback Brock Vereen, who was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the fourth round. The other starting corner from last season, Eric Murray, led the team with 10 pass breakups, which ranked sixth in the Big Ten. Just a junior this fall, Murray has 16 tackles, one interception, and two pass breakups so far. The other corners are junior Briean Boddy-Calhoun, who tore his ACL last season, and senior Derrick Wells, who was hampered most of 2013 with a shoulder injury. Boddy-Calhoun leads the team with two interceptions and five pass breakups so far.

The safety spots are filled by Cedric Thompson — last season’s leading tackler — junior Antonio Johnson, and junior Damarius Travis. Johnson and Travis each have a pick so far this season.

Special Teams: The other third

Redshirt freshman kicker Ryan Santoso was rated the seventh-best kicker in the 2013 class by ESPN and is replacing Chris Hawthorne, who made 14-of-18 last season. Santoso has made just 1-of-3 so far this season with a long of 38. Redshirt junior punter Peter Mortell is a nice weapon to have after ranking third in the Big Ten with a 43.3-yard average a year ago. He’s currently averaging 46.2 yards, which ranks second in the conference, behind only Nebraska’s Sam Foltz.

Defensive back Marcus Jones ranked sixth in the Big Ten in kick returns last season, averaging 24.9 yards per return. He’s currently right on pace, averaging 24.4 yards. He’s also handling most of the punt return duties with six returns for an average of eight yards.

Prediction:

Minnesota is going to try to run the ball, run the ball some more, and run the ball some more. The good news is that plays right into Michigan’s defensive strength. Expect Greg Mattison to load the box to stop the run and force Streveler to try to make big plays with his arm. He has completed just 4-of-11 passes for 37 yards in his career, so that’s a good thing for Michigan’s young corners, Jourdan Lewis and Jabrill Peppers.

Offensively, Michigan is also going to try to run the ball a lot with Derrick Green, but given the success teams have had passing on the Gophers so far, Michigan can have some success through the air. Could this be Shane Morris’ coming out party? I wouldn’t go that far, but I am looking forward to seeing what he can do as the (presumed) starter.

Expect a fairly low-scoring game with neither team able to pull away. Michigan will win, and while I don’t think it will be decisively, it won’t be too close for comfort either.

Michigan 24 – Minnesota 13

Can Michigan’s offense improve? A case study on in-season improvement

Thursday, September 25th, 2014


Michigan offense(MGoBlue.com)

Michigan’s offense has been the subject of great concern through the first third of this season. It looked great against Appalachian State in Week 1, but of course, that was against Appalachian State, a first-year FBS school and a team nowhere close to the three-time FCS champion team it was when it beat Michigan in 2007. The offense was exposed against Notre Dame in Week 2, failing to reach the Irish red zone or score a single point, resulting in Michigan’s first shutout in 30 years. While it sputtered a bit in the first half against Miami (Ohio) in Week 3, the end result showed a solid performance. But the problems came back last week against Utah as the offense once again failed to reach the red zone or score a touchdown.

So what gives? Is there any hope for a turnaround as the season goes on, or is it simply a lost cause? Let’s take a look at a recent comparison that could provide a sliver of hope.

Offensive Comparison through four games
Team 1 Team 2
22.0 Offensive points per game 20.5
10 Offensive touchdowns 10
1,363 Total yards 1,617
340.8 Total yards per game 404.2
748 Rushing yards 844
187.0 Rushing yards per game 211.0
4.6 Rushing yards per carry 5.6
615 Passing yards 773
153.8 Passing yards per game 193.2
6 Turnovers 12

We need to look no further than our friends 60 miles up Interstate-96 for a recent example of an inept offense turning things around over the course of a season. A year ago at this time we were all mocking the Michigan State offense for its inability to move the ball and find the end zone.

In the chart above, Team 1 is last year’s Michigan State offense through its first four games. Team 2 is this year’s Michigan offense through its first four games. As you can see, they compare rather favorably. Both offenses scored 10 touchdowns, but Michigan State made two more field goals than Michigan’s has. Michigan’s offense averaged 64 more yards per game, 24 more rushing yards, a whole yard more yard per carry, and 40 more passing yards. The main difference is that Michigan’s offense turned the ball over twice as many times as Michigan State’s did.

But how did the quality of opponents compare? I’m glad you asked. Actually, the four teams Michigan has played this season have been tougher than the four Michigan State opened with in 2013. Michigan State played Western Michigan, South Florida, Youngstown State, and Notre Dame, four teams that finished the season with a combined record of 20-29. Essentially, three cupcakes and Notre Dame.

Youngstown State was an FCS program and can be compared to this year’s Appalachian State. Western Michigan, which finished 1-11, can be compared to this year’s Miami (Ohio). Notre Dame is obviously the only shared team, although this year’s Notre Dame is likely a little bit better than last year’s. So that leaves last year’s South Florida compared to this year’s Utah. South Florida went 2-10 last season with wins against Cincinnati (26-20) and UConn (13-10). They lost to McNeese State and Florida Atlantic. Utah is a top-25 caliber team that would likely be in the top third of the Big Ten this season. Much better than last year’s South Florida.

So now that we’ve established that Michigan’s offense has actually been better than 2013 Michigan State’s through four games, and has done so against better competition, let’s look at three factors that could bring about improvement.

1. New quarterback

It appears that Brady Hoke will turn to sophomore Shane Morris this Saturday. Morris has one career start under his belt — the 2013 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl. He completed 24-of-38 passes for 196 yards and an interception. In spot duty so far this season, he has completed just 7-of-20 for 79 yards and two interceptions. Those numbers don’t suggest much, but given the start to the season, it can’t hurt to give him a shot as the starter and see if he can provide a spark.

One of the main keys to Michigan State’s offensive turnaround last season was the progress of quarterback Connor Cook as the season went on. He didn’t begin the season as the starter, but once he officially won the job, he took it and ran with it. After that Notre Dame game, the job was fully his, and he finished the season with 200-yard passing games in seven of the final 10 games, including back-to-back 300-yard passing games against Ohio State and Stanford.

Nussmeier admitted the offense is still in its infancy and should continue to grow throughout the season (Leon Halip, Getty Images)

Nussmeier admitted the offense is still in its infancy and should continue to grow throughout the season (Leon Halip, Getty Images)

We know that Devin Gardner is capable of putting up big numbers (see: Notre Dame, Indiana, Ohio State in 2013). But we’ve also seen him struggle with consistency, decision-making, and footwork, which have led to turnovers galore. Whether his issues are physical or mental, perhaps it will help him to watch from the sidelines for a bit. Morris doesn’t have the baggage that Gardner has — three different offensive coordinators in five years, switch to receiver, beaten up thanks to a porous offensive line last season — and thus, could show the same type of progression throughout the season that Cook showed a year ago.

2. Growth of Nussmeier’s offense

After three years of Al Borges running the offense, Hoke fired him and brought in Alabama offensive coordinator Doug Nussmeier. The early returns on his offense have been underwhelming, but the towel shouldn’t be thrown in just yet. Keep in mind that it has only been four games. Everyone wants to win and win now, especially after the last six years, but installing a new offense takes time.

“[The offense is] still in infancy stages here, we’re still learning to play consistently well,” Nussmeier said after the Notre Dame loss. “It’s about 11 guys on every play, doing the right thing…If it’s 10 guys doing the right thing, and one guy doing the wrong thing, you’re doomed. We’ve got to get 11 guys, on every play, doing the right thing.”

The offense has shown that it can move the ball, but it has been plagued by untimely mistakes — a sack here, a holding penalty there — that have stalled drives, created third-and-longs, and led to turnovers. As Drew Hallett pointed out this afternoon, every team in college football in 2013 combined to score either a touchdown or field goal or reach the red zone 69 percent of the time they crossed midfield. Based on that data, the odds of an offense crossing midfield 12 times and failing to score or reach the red zone 11 of those times was 0.002 percent. Yet that’s what this Michigan offense has done against Notre Dame and Utah.

Eventually, that’s going to improve. As players get more comfortable with the offense and it continues to expand throughout the season, drive-killing mistakes won’t continue to happen — at least with as much frequency. And as that improves, Michigan will score more points.

We’ve already seen Derrick Green show improvement from last season. He has 391 yards through four games. Michigan State running back Jeremy Langford, who finished last season with 1,422 yards — fifth-best in the Big Ten — had just 268 through his first four games last season. In addition, we know the explosiveness Devin Funchess can bring, but much of Gardner’s problems had to do with locking onto Funchess. Perhaps Morris will go through his progressions more than Gardner has and find receivers other than Funchess, which is important for the offense to continue to grow, and allow fellow receivers Jehu Chesson and Amara Darboh to take on a larger role. Keeping with the Michigan State theme, no one thought much of Michigan State’s receivers heading into last season, but Bennie Fowler, Tony Lippett, Macgarrett Kings, and Keith Mumphrey played a big part in their success as the season went on.

3. Turnovers evening out

Michigan has averaged three turnovers per game so far this season. It’s impossible to beat good teams when that happens. To make matters worse, the defense, as solid as it has been, only has two takeaways, which means it isn’t setting the offense up with field position that it can take advantage of. Michigan currently ranks last nationally in turnover margin (minus-10). Those numbers are bound to even out during the final two-thirds of the season.

Interceptions are, most of the time, the fault of the quarterback, but which team recovers fumbles is largely a result of luck — the luck of the bounce or being in the right place at the right time. Michigan has lost four of the six times it has fumbled and hasn’t recovered either of the two opponent fumbles. So that’s six of eight fumbles that have bounced the wrong way. Turn those around and the turnover issues aren’t quite as grim. That’s why, as the season goes on, the numbers are bound to equal out.

Conclusion:

Of course, Shane Morris might end up being farther behind than we hope, the team might not get a good grasp of Nussmeier’s offense, and it might continue turning the ball over and failing to force turnovers defensively. And just because Michigan State’s offense turned around last season, it doesn’t mean Michigan’s will follow suit. But at the very least, there is recent precedent for it happening and signs that it could. As long as Michigan’s defense continues to play at the high level it has been, any improvement by the offense as the season goes on will give Michigan a chance to win every remaining game.

Minnesota Q&A with JDMill of The Daily Gopher

Thursday, September 25th, 2014


Minnesota Q-A_banner

Each Thursday throughout the season we collaborate with that week’s opponent blog to get some questions answered by the guys who know more about their team than we do. This week, we partnered with JDMill of the Minnesota SB Nation blog, The Daily Gopher. He was kind enough to answer questions about the stagnant Gopher passing game, whether Minnesota can run on Michigan’s defense, how Minnesota fans view the Michigan current state of affairs, and more. You can follow The Daily Gopher on Twitter at @TheDailyGopher and you can follow JDMill at @jdmill.

1. What’s up with the Minnesota passing game? Less than 100 yards a game? Only seven yards last week? What’s the deal?

What came first, the chicken or the egg? That’s kind of the deal with the Gophers. Do they not pass very often because the running game is so good, or do they not pass very often because the passing game is so bad?

If you ask the coaches, they will tell you that the running game has been working, so there hasn’t been a need to pass. I think the fans are a little bit more nervous. Take a look at the TCU game. The Gophers were forced to pass because they got behind early and the run game wasn’t as effective as needed. As such, Mitch Leidner threw 26 times, completing just 12 for 151 yards, no touchdowns and three interceptions. Not. Pretty.

So while the coaches will tell you that if the running game is working there is no reason to pass, they have also admitted this week that they are going to need to be able to throw the ball more effectively to keep teams honest now that we’re hitting the conference schedule.

2. The running game on the other hand has been pretty good, especially David Cobb. Michigan’s rush defense has only allowed one of its four opponents (Appalachian State in Week 1) to rush for over 100 yards. Do you think Minnesota will be able to run on Michigan?

I do think we’ll be able to run a bit on Michigan, but we’ve been averaging over 230 yards rushing per game in the non-con, and I don’t think we’ll be able to do that against the Wolverines. The trump card, however, is quarterback Chris Streveler. With him behind center the Gophers have a true, fast addition that seems to be able to run the read-option pretty effectively. I could see a scenario where Minnesota puts up 150 yards rushing with at least half of that coming from the quarterback.

3. Minnesota also has a pretty good run defense, but three of the four opponents have thrown for over 250 yards. Michigan’s offense has had well-publicized problems against the only power-five teams it has played (Notre Dame and Utah). Do you think Minnesota’s defense can force Michigan’s offense into those same types of mistakes?

This is a defense that gives up a fair number of yards, but not a lot of points. The Gophers give up 122 yards per game more than Michigan, but we’ve allowed the exact same number of points. In fact, Minnesota has given up more yards than it has produced in three out of our four games this season so far.

The Gopher defense is opportunistic and that’s an important characteristic for a team that is going to struggle to throw the ball. The defense has given this team points and short fields, and I believe they will continue that trend and win the turnover battle with Michigan.

4. What’s your view on the current state of the Michigan program? Things are falling apart at the seams here, but what does it look like from the outside? And do Gopher fans enjoy seeing Michigan struggle like this?

Well, from the outside it looks like things are falling apart at the seams

I think the biggest eye-opener for everyone else in the conference was when Notre Dame took the Wolverines behind the wood shed. For me, anyway, that was just shocking. We expect Michigan to at least be competitive and they just didn’t even show up. And then to follow that up with the effort against Utah…well, you guys lived it so I won’t go on.

I’m hard pressed to say that Gopher fans enjoy it. I mean, I think schadenfreude is always alive and well in the B1G and Michigan has beaten the tar out of us for 45 years, so it certainly doesn’t hurt us to see this happening and I think Gopher fans smell blood in the water and a chance to get a trophy back. But the reality is that a competitive Michigan is good for the B1G, and I think deep down we know that.

The interesting piece of the puzzle here is that Brady Hoke is who many Gopher fans wanted as coach when Minnesota got Jerry Kill. The rumor is that Hoke turned down the job knowing that the Michigan job was probably in his grasp.

5. What’s your prediction, and why?

I REALLY want to predict a Gopher win here. I REALLY want to believe that Michigan is down on itself enough that Minnesota will be able to take advantage, dominate defensively, and do enough on offense to put up some points. In order for that to happen I think we’d be looking at a 17-10 type of game and one of the Gopher touchdowns would be from defense or special teams.

However, I’ve been around long enough to know that weird things happen to Minnesota when we play Michigan. Things fall apart for the Gophers. Michigan wakes up. Quarterbacks have career days against our defense. And knowing the history of this rivalry, my fragile psyche just won’t let me predict a Gopher win. To paraphrase the Gin Blossoms, if I don’t expect to much of the Gophers I might not be let down.

Michigan 24 – Minnesota 17.

Big Ten power rankings: Week 4

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014


Power Rankings_header

Week 4 was a much-needed good week for the Big Ten with all but two teams picking up wins. Those two teams were Michigan and Ohio State. The bad news for Michigan fans is that Ohio State had a bye week, which means Michigan was the only conference team that lost last Saturday.

East Division
1. Penn State (4-0, 1-0) – Even
Last Week: Beat UMass 48-7 This Week: Sat vs Northwestern (1-2), 12pm, Big Ten Network

Penn State stayed hot this weekend, dominating UMass 48-7. With the rest of the conference struggling, the newly bowl-eligible Nittany Lions have emerged as the toughest competition for Michigan State in the East.

2. Michigan State (2-1, 0-0) – Even
Last Week: Beat Eastern Michigan 73-14 This Week: Sat vs Wyoming (3-1), 12pm, ESPN2

The Spartans bounced back from the tough loss at Oregon by pounding Eastern Michigan following the bye week. The Spartans defense is as strong as it’s ever been heading into a conference slate littered with teams that struggle to score.

3. Indiana (2-1, 0-0) – Up 4
Last Week: Beat #18 Missouri 31-27 This Week: Sat vs Maryland (3-1), 1:30pm, Big Ten Network

Indiana pulled off the biggest win of the non conference schedule for the Big Ten by beating SEC contender Missouri on a last minute score. The Hoosiers came out of nowhere for the win, proving that an elite offense will give them a chance to stay in every game going forward.

4. Maryland (3-1, 0-0) – Up 1
Last Week: Beat Syracuse 34-20 This Week: Sat at Indiana (2-1), 1:30pm, Big Ten Network

Beating power conference opponents on thr the road is always a good way to build a stronger resume, and Maryland did just that this weekend, pounding Syracuse by two touchdowns.

5. Ohio State (2-1, 0-0) – Down 2
Last Week: Bye This Week: Sat vs Cincinnati (2-0), 6pm, Big Ten Network

Ohio State took a week off after bouncing back from a loss to Virginia Tech. The Buckeyes should finish near the top of the East standings, but they won’t contend with Michigan State.

6. Michigan (2-2, 0-0) – Down 2
Last Week: Lost to Utah 10-26 This Week: Sat vs Minnesota (3-1), 3:30pm, ABC/ESPN2

Saturday turned into a disaster for Michigan when the team failed to show up against a talented Utah team. The program is under siege from the fanbase and Brady Hoke is clinging to his job by a thread heading into the Big Ten season.

7. Rutgers (3-1, 0-1) – Down 1
Last Week: Beat Navy 31-24 This Week: Sat vs Tulane (1-3), 12pm, ESPNNews

Rutgers turned in an impressive performance against Navy on Saturday, beating the Midshipmen on the road. Rutgers has to consider the 3-1 start a success, but a brutal conference schedule leaves little hope for the team in the big picture.

West Division
1. Nebraska (4-0, 0-0) – Even
Last Week: Beat Miami 41-31 This Week: Sat Illinois (3-1), 9pm, Big Ten Network

It wasn’t always pretty for Nebraska in the preconference schedule, but in a year when so many if their Big Ten rivals were upset, Bo Pelini will gladly take a spotless 4-0 start to 2014.

2. Minnesota (3-1, 0-0) – Up 1
Last Week: Beat San Jose State 24-7 This Week: Sat at Michigan (2-2), 3:30pm, ABC/ESPN2

Minnesota put in a strong defensive effort to stay perfect Saturday against San Jose State. The Gophers will take their show on the road this weekend in the battle for the Little Brown Jug in Ann Arbor.

3. Wisconsin (2-1, 0-0) – Down 1
Last Week: Beat Bowling Green 68-17 This Week: Sat vs South Florida (2-2), 12pm, ESPN2

Melvin Gordon and the Badger offense put on a rushing show Saturday against a Bowling Green team that upset Indiana last weekend. The team rushed for over 600 yards in the contest and demonstrated why it is favored to win the West.

4. Iowa (3-1, 0-0) – Up 2
Last Week: Beat Pittsburgh 24-20 This Week: Sat at Purdue (2-2), 12pm, Big Ten Network

Iowa put in its best effort of the season Saturday, beating Pittsburgh on the road. The Hawkeyes played inconsistent football throughout the preconference schedule and were fortunate to come out with three wins.

5. Illinois (3-1, 0-0) – Even
Last Week: Beat Texas State 42-35 This Week: Sat at #21 Nebraska (4-0), 9pm, Big Ten Network

For the third time this season Illinois played with fire but escaped, moving to 3-1 on the year. This time the Fighting Illini pulled through in a shootout, winning 42-35 over Texas State.

6. Purdue (2-2, 0-0) – Down 2
Last Week: Beat Southern Illinois 35-13 This Week: Sat vs Iowa (3-1), 12pm, Big Ten Network

Purdue pulled back to .500 Saturday by crushing a weak Southern Illinois team at home. The Big Ten will reap few victories for the Boilermakers this season.

7. Northwestern (1-2, 0-0) – Even
Last Week: Beat Western Illinois 24-7 This Week: Sat at Penn State (4-0), 12pm, Big Ten Network

Pat Fitzgerald followed up the bye week by getting the monkey off his team’s back, beating Western Illinois 24-7. It looks like it will be another difficult year for the Wildcats in 2014.

Final Look: Utah

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014


Henry-Ryan sack(MGoBlue.com)

Another week, another clunker. Michigan couldn’t muster any offense against Utah, instead turning the ball over four times and failing to reach the red zone or score an offensive touchdown for the second time in three weeks. Despite a valiant effort from the defense, which held the Utes to half of their season average yards per game, Michigan fell 26-10.

This Saturday, Michigan hosts the Minnesota Golden Gophers, hoping to hang onto the Little Brown Jug for another year. But before we fully turn our attention to Minnesota, let’s take one last look back at the big plays, numbers, stats, and observations from Michigan’s loss last Saturday.

Three key moments

1. Lewis saves a touchdown

For the second straight week Jourdan Lewis made a big play defensively, and while it didn’t ultimately affect the outcome of the game, it did save four points. Michigan kicked a field goal on its first possession to take an early 3-0 lead, but was unable to do anything with its second possession. But Will Hagerup pinned Utah at its own 3-yard line, giving the defense an opportunity to make a stop and get the ball back in good field position.

Quarterback Travis Wilson completed a five-yard pass on the firs play and Michigan stuffed running back Bubba Poole for no gain on the second. On third-and-five, Wilson found Poole on a screen pass and Michigan’s defense was nowhere to be found. Poole raced down the left sideline with nothing but green grass in front of him. However, Lewis sprinted from the opposite side of the field and caught Poole at the 25-yard line, saving a sure touchdown. Utah wound up kicking a 35-yard field goal, but three points is much better than seven.

Willie Henry scored Michigan's first defensive touchdown of the season (MGoBlue.com)

Willie Henry scored Michigan’s first defensive touchdown of the season (MGoBlue.com)

2. Clay channels Desmond

Not all key moments will be positive ones, and this is certainly the case here. In my opinion, this was perhaps the biggest play of the game as it served as a soul crusher for Michigan. Utah had tied the game at three, and Michigan had the ball heading into the second quarter.

The Wolverines went three-and-out, but the defense had been holding strong. If it could continue to do so, perhaps the offense could eventually put some points on the board. But Will Hagerup’s 46-yard punt was fielded by Utah return man Kaelyn Clay at the Utah 34-yard line and he was off to the races. He made Michigan gunners Jehu Chesson and Dennis Norfleet miss and then out-ran the rest of the group. Hagerup nearly caught him at the Michigan 30, but was unable to knock him off balance. Clay raced into the end zone and struck the Heisman pose, a nod — or mockery — of the infamous Desmond Howard pose against Ohio State in 1991.

3. Big Willie style

Michigan’s offense was struggling to string together a consistent drive and the Wolverines were in danger of falling behind considerably. After an opening drive field goal, Michigan went punt, punt, punt, punt, interception. Midway through the second quarter, Michigan needed a spark to come from somewhere. Utah held a 10-3 lead after Kaelyn Clays returned punt. Starting Utah quarterback Travis Wilson had been knocked out of the game — for a while anyway — by Joe Bolen and backup Kendal Thompson came in.

On his first possession, Jake Ryan sacked him on third-and-4, forcing the Utes to punt. After a Devin Gardner interception gave Thompson the ball back again, defensive tackle Willie Henry took matters into his own hands. On third-and-12 from the Utah 13, Thompson dropped back to pass and tried to float a screen pass. But Henry reached up and snagged it out of the air at the 7-yard line and rumbled into the end zone to tie the game at 10. It was Michigan’s first defensive touchdown since Brennen Beyer did the same at Iowa last November.

The numbers game

2:25: The amount of time the rain delay lasted

360: Devin Gardner’s career completions. He passed Brian Griese for eighth on Michigan’s career list

5,860: Devin Gardner’s career total yards. He passed Todd Collins and Jim Harbaugh for seventh on the career list

13: Jake Ryan had a career-high 13 tackles

Drive Chart
UM
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU
UM
UU

 

*Hover over team initials to see drive statistics, Dash indicates direction of drive, Green dash = scoring play, Grey = punt, Red = turnover, Pink = missed field goal, Black = end of half or turnover on downs, Shaded line = special teams or defensive touchdown

Vote for the performance of the game

Previous winners:
Appalachian State: Devin Gardner (13-of-14 for 173 yds, 3 TD) & Devin Funchess (7 rec for 95 yds, 3 TD) – Tie
Notre Dame: Devin Funchess (9 receptions for 107 yards)
Miami (Ohio): Amara Darboh (6 receptions for 88 yards, 1 TD)
People Lists on Ranker

Smoked “Land of 10,000 lakes” catfish

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014


TailgateTuesday_banner-Week5

Tailgate Tuesday is our weekly collaboration with Joe from MmmGoBluBBQ. These will be posted each Tuesday throughout the season and each recipe will be themed around that week’s opponent. 

Previously: Hot-’n-Fast pulled pork with Carolina mustard slawIrish stout pepper beefSpatchcock RedHawk, Grilled Ravioli.

Bring on those Golden Gophers from the great state of Minnesota. Or, as they say, the land of 10,000 lakes. I wanted to venture out and try something new for the start of the Big Ten season. Since I didn’t have any moose meat laying around and didn’t know if gopher was even legal to eat, I decided to try some smoked fish. I went through the freezer looking for some walleye I had tricked into the boat last year on our Canadian fishing extravaganza but had no luck. The best I could do was a mess of fresh catfish filets a buddy of mine dropped off. They turned out to be extremely tasty and will be a staple moving forward for sure. Here is what you will need.

Ingredients:

• 1 Catfish filet (Per person)
• Buttermilk
• Hot Sauce (your favorite)
• Seasoning (your favorite BBQ rub will do)

Directions:

Cover and soak the fish filets in a mixture of buttermilk and your favorite hot sauce. I used about 1/8 cup of Franks Red Hot sauce and it came thru very mildly in the taste of the fish. Use as much or as little as you’d like.

After one hour in the buttermilk, remove the fillets and pat them dry with a paper towel. Season both sides with your favorite BBQ rub. Don’t be shy!

Catfish 1-2-3

Fire up the grill or smoker to 225-250 degrees. I love a good apple or pecan wood for fish as it won’t overpower the fish flavor. Set the grill up for indirect heat and add the wood chunks. Once the smoke is flowing, place the seasoned fillets on the greased grill grates and close the lid.

This is a short cook, so don’t plan on going far. After about 30 minutes, check the fish and make sure you are getting some good color. You will notice the fish is starting to sweat a little. This is a good thing.

After an hour, your fish should have a nice dark color with the edges starting to get a little crispy. We are about 15-30 minutes away from a finished Cajun smoked catfish dinner. After 90 minutes on the smoker, you should be able to poke the fish with your finger and it will flake. It should still be moist, but have some flakiness to it. This is when its done. I made some red beans and rice (out of the box) as a side and added some grilled lemon juice.

Catfish 4-5

Thanks again for reading and let me know if you have any recipes to you would like me to try. I am always interested in new and tasty grilled goodies. Go Blue!

For more great recipes, photos, and barbecue ideas, follow Joe on Twitter at @mmmgoblubbq. And don’t forget to check out his site, MmmGoBluBBQ, for recipes, product reviews, and more.

First Look: Minnesota

Monday, September 22nd, 2014


FirstLook-Minnesota

The heat in Ann Arbor has nearly reached the fiery furnaces of hell and it seems most Michigan fans think that’s where the football program is at this point. But there are still eight games to play, beginning with a team Michigan has dominated the last 45 years. Minnesota comes to town looking to capture the Little Brown Jug for just the third time since 1968. The Gophers have beaten Western Michigan, Middle Tennessee, and San Jose State, and lost to TCU. Let’s take a look at how Michigan and Minnesota compare through four games.

Minnesota Statistics & Michigan Comparison
MinnesotaMichigan Rank Defense Rank
Points Per Game 27.0 | 24.0 82 | T91 20.2 | 20.2 T33T33
Rushing Yards 945 | 844 526 | 321
Rush Avg. Per Game 236.2 | 211.0 29 | 37 131.5 | 80.2 51 | 9
Avg. Per Rush 5.1 | 5.6
3.7 | 2.5
Passing Yards 399 | 773 1,009 | 723
Pass Avg. Per Game 99.8 | 193.2 121 | 98 252.2 | 180.8 82 | 27
Total Offense 1,3441,617 1,535 | 1,044
Total Off Avg. Per Game 336.0 | 404.2 104 | 78 383.8 | 261.0 66 | 8
Kick Return Average 24.4 | 19.0 30 | T88 18.3 | 19.2 30 | T48
Punt Return Average 9.7 | 9.8 54 | T51 10.4 | 14.6 87 | 105
Avg. Time of Possession 31:18 | 32:42 35 | 22
28:42 | 27:18
3rd Down Conversion Pct 37.0% | 45.0% 95 | 47
40.0% | 33.0% 72 | 39
Sacks Allowed-Yards/By-Yards 4-26 | 8-53
T22 | T80
8-54 | 7-67
T62 | T78
Touchdowns Scored 15 | 12
10 | 9
Field Goals-Attempts 1-3 | 4-7 4-8 | 6-7
Red Zone Scores (10-13) 77% | (10-10) 100% 90 | T1
(9-11) 82%(10-11) 91% T57 | T91
Red Zone Touchdowns (10-13) 77% | (8-10) 80% (6-11) 55% | (6-11) 55%

Michigan’s offense isn’t exactly setting the world on fire, but believe it or not, Minnesota’s is even worse. Sure, the Gophers are averaging three points more, but they haven’t played a team near Notre Dame or Utah’s level yet. Okay, TCU may be about Utah’s level, but Western Michigan, Middle Tennessee, and San Jose State are nowhere close.

Even so, Minnesota’s offense ranks 104th nationally, averaging 68 fewer total yards per game than Michigan’s. The one positive for the Gophers is the running game, which ranks 29th nationally, averaging 236.2 yards per game — 25 more than Michigan. Running back David Cobb is one of the best in the Big Ten and is currently sixth nationally with 539 yards, averaging 135 yards a game and 5.9 yards per carry. By comparison, Derrick Green has 391 yards, but 28 fewer carries.

Schedule
Date Opponent Result
Aug. 28 Eastern Illinois W 42-20
Sept. 6 Middle Tennessee State W 35-24
Sept. 13 at TCU L 7-30
Sept. 20 San Jose State W 24-7
Sept. 27 at Michigan
Oct. 11 Northwestern
Oct. 18 Purdue
Oct. 25 at Illinois
Nov. 8 Iowa
Nov. 15 Ohio State
Nov. 22 at Nebraska
Nov. 29 at Wisconsin

Even with the gaudy rushing numbers, the Gophers running game is vulnerable. In Week 1 against Western Michigan, Minnesota rushed for 182 yards on 40 carries — a decent 4.6 yards per carry, but not great, though that can be excused in the first game of the season. Against Middle Tennessee in Week 2, the Gophers gained 284 yards on 50 carries, and last week against San Jose State, they exploded for 380 yards on 58 carries. But against the only good defense they faced, TCU in Week 3, Minnesota was held to just 99 yards on 39 carries — just 2.5 yards per carry. Cobb only managed 41 yards on 15 carries in that game.

While the running game has had some success this season, the passing game is a different story. Minnesota is averaging less than 100 passing yards per game, which ranks 121st nationally, better than only four teams — Navy, New Mexico, Eastern Michigan, and Army. In two of the four games, Minnesota hasn’t even managed 100 passing yards, and last week the Gophers pass for just seven (!) yards.

Defensively, Minnesota has fared slightly better, holding opponents to an average of 20.2 points per game, the exact same as Michigan. The rush defense ranks 51st, allowing 131.5 yards per game, while the pass defense ranks 82nd, allowing 252.2 yards per game. None of the four opponents has rushed for more than 200 yards on the Gophers — Middle Tennessee had the most with 190 — but three of the four have thrown for over 250 yards.

Special teams-wise, Minnesota has made just 1-of-3 field goal attempts and average 44.2 yards per punt. They average five yards per kick return more than Michigan and about the same as Michigan per punt return.

There’s a lot of pessimism surrounding the Michigan football program right now, but there’s no reason to believe the Little Brown Jug won’t be staying in Ann Arbor for another year. If Michigan stops the run, Michigan wins. It’s as simple as that.

Key Players
Passing Comp-Att Yards TD INT Average/Game
Mitch Leidner 26-54 362 2 4 120.7
Chris Streveler 4-11 37 1 1 9.2
Rushing Attempts Yards TD Long Average/Carry
David Cobb 92 539 4 48 5.9
Chris Streveler (QB) 31 219 1 30 7.0
Berkley Edwards 16 92 2 42 5.8
Mitch Leidner (QB) 21 77 2 10 2.4
Receiving Receptions Yards TD Long Average/Game
Maxx Williams (TE) 6 10 2 32 36.7
Donovahn Jones 6 92 1 35 23.0
Drew Wolitarsky 4 31 0 16 10.3
David Cobb (RB) 3 38 0 16 9.5
K.J. Maye 2 65 0 34 16.2
Defense Solo Assisted Total Tackles TFL-Yds Sacks-Yds
Damien Wilson (LB) 22 22 44 3.0-13 1.5-9 (1 INT, 1FR)
De’Vondre Campbell (LB) 15 6 21 1.0-6 0-0 (1 FR)
Cam Botticelli (DL) 8 4 12 3.5-13 1.0-8
Briean Boddy-Calhoun (DB) 8 8 16 1.0-2 0-0 (2 INT, 3PD)
Hendrick Ekpe (DL) 7 3 10 3.0-11 1.5-9
Kicking FG Made FG Att Long XP Made XP Att
Ryan Santoso 1 3 38 15 15
Punting Punts Yds Avg. In-20 50+
Peter Mortell 22 1,017 46.2 5 9
Full Stats

Stay tuned for more on Minnesota in the coming days.