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Posts Tagged ‘Michigan Football’

42 years later: Steve Strinko recaps graduation, recalls 12-year old Harbaugh, and looks forward to helping others

Friday, May 13th, 2016


Strinko and Harbaugh

Forty-two years after leaving Michigan for the National Football League, Steve Strinko can finally call himself a Michigan graduate. On April 29, Strinko donned his cap and gown and joined current U of M seniors in receiving a diploma. But he looked a little bit different than the other 110 student-athletes that walked with him.

“I got this wild idea on Wednesday because I don’t use a walker that often — only when I’m traveling and might walk a long distance,” Strinko said. “I got this idea to paint it maize and blue. Then I found a way to stencil an M on the seat. So as I walked across the stage I was pushing my Michigan walker along.”

Strinko with his Michigan walker

Strinko with his Michigan walker

While the age difference — and the toll it has taken on his body — set him apart, the 1974 Michigan football most valuable player was welcomed with open arms by the current team.

“Jehu Chesson came over and tapped me on the shoulder while all the seniors were getting to their seats and said ‘hey man, did you play football?'” Strikno recalled. “I said yeah, and he said we’ve got a spot over here with the team. So I went over there and sat with him and his roommate (fullback Sione Houma, who recently signed an undrafted free agent contract with the New Orleans Saints). He’s Tongan and had a leather skirt underneath his gown, which I thought was hilarious. I said ‘you’ve got to be pretty confident about your sexuality to wear a dress around’ and he started laughing and said ‘yeah, I’m pretty confident.'”

Strinko relished the comradre he shared with the current players who were joining him in graduation on a weekend in which he also reunited with some of his former teammates.

I was humbled with the number of people that showed up. Both of my roommates from college were there. Dave Metz was my roommate the first two years and he played guard. Mark Elzinga was a backup quarterback; he was my roommate for my junior and senior year.”

After receiving his degree, Strinko, who once watched a Super Bowl in Woody Hayes’ living room, was courted by Bear Bryant, and played for Bo Schembechler, was greeted by current Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh.

“I went up to him and he said ‘Strinko, congratulations.’ And I said ‘better late than never. It only took me 42 years.'”

Strinko recalled his fondness of the Harbaughs, which spans nearly a half century. In 1969, Jim’s dad, Jack, tried to recruit Strinko to Bowling Green and was the first college coach to shake his hand and tell him he wanted him to come play for him. Strinko, of course, signed with Schembechler, and Harbaugh told him “you’re going to get lost in the shuffle because it’s such a huge school, such a big program.”

“The funny thing is in 1973, he shows up as an assistant,” Strinko said. “I will never forget going up to him and saying ‘coach, aren’t you afraid you’re going to get lost in the shuffle here?'”

As for Jim, Strinko remembers him as being a “12-year old kid bouncing off the walls when I played.”

“Jimmy was somewhat of a pest — he and his brother, both. I remember on several occasions when they duck-taped Jimmy to a locker just to curb his enthusiasm,” Strikno recalled, laughing. “It was clearly obvious at that age that he was passionate about the game. It was incredible.”

And here they are, decades later, at different stages in life, but both having returned to Ann Arbor. While Harbaugh is hard at work trying to bring Michigan back from years of malaise, Strinko can afford to pat himself on the back for overcoming hardship and achieving his degree.

Strinko and his brother, Greg, with Jehu Chesson

Strinko and his brother, Greg, with Jehu Chesson

“All my life, with what I had gone through with getting addicted to substances, it was a big deal for me to start at point A and have a point B out there somewhere in the future and actually get to that point. It gave me confidence that there may be some value to this old fart after all.”

Taking after Harbaugh’s enthusiasm unknown to mankind, Strinko isn’t stopping at just a Bachelor’s degree. He’s currently working on his Master’s degree via online courses through Liberty University. He admitted part of the reason for continuing his education was that he took so many classes that he wanted to make absolutely certain that he had enough credits to graduate from Michigan.

Strinko also looks forward to trying to help other former Michigan football players overcome the same types of struggles that tripped him up after his football career. His Foundation for Athletes in Need is in the process of obtaining 501c3 status in Missouri, where he currently lives, and he’s also in talks with fellow U-M football alum Jim Betts about pairing with the Michigan Football Alumni Network’s Team Big House, which Betts, Jim Brandstatter, and John Wanlger are organizing.

“I know we’ve got guys out there who are hurting,” Strikno said. “I know we’ve got guys out there addicted to Oxytoxins. I think it would be naive to think that kind of stuff isn’t happening on a regular basis, and if it’s happening with guys at Michigan that are former football players, then obviously it’s happening elsewhere.

“We want to create something at Michigan where we can have an organization that we get together when home games are in town and provide one free ticket to home games for all former players for the rest of their life and we step up to help when they’re struggling financially or otherwise.”

It has been a long and bumpy road for Strinko, but like the hard-hitting linebacker he once was, he prefers to charge ahead rather than dwell on the past. Now he can do so as a University of Michigan graduate.
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Click to read Part 1 and Part 2 of the backstory.

New in Blue: 2017 LB Ben Mason

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016


Ben Mason(H John Voorhees III, Hearst Connecticut Media)

Ben Mason – LB | 6-2, 247 | Sandy Hook, Conn. (Newtown)
ESPNN/A Rivals: 3-star, N/A 247: 3-star, #28 ILB Scout: 3-star, #32 ILB
247 Composite: 3-star #35 ILB
Other top offers: Wisconsin, Cal, Pittsburgh, Duke, Syracuse, Navy, Uconn, Boston College, Temple

Michigan picked up a 12th member of its 2017 recruiting class on Tuesday evening when Sandy Hook, Conn. linebacker Ben Mason picked the Wolverines during a ceremony at Newtown High School.

Mason is a three-star recruit according to 247, Rivals, and Scout, and the 247 Composite. ESPN hasn’t ranked him yet. 247 ranks him as the 28th-best inside linebacker in the class, while Scout ranks him 32nd. ESPN and Rivals haven’t released their position rankings to date.

Mason holds offers from Wisconsin, California, Pittsburgh, Duke, and Navy, to name a few, and feigned picking a Cal hat before he selected the Michigan one during the ceremony. He said he could play either linebacker or fullback for the Wolverines. He joins fellow linebackers Josh Ross and Chase Laseter in the class.

The 6-foot-2, 247-pounder recorded 113 tackles, 11 for loss, four sacks, and four interceptions last season. As a sophomore in 2014, he tallied 110 tackles, six for loss, 5.5 sacks, two fumble recoveries and a pick. Adding in his freshman season, Mason has already amassed 290 tackles and could surpass 400 with another similar season this fall before moving to Ann Arbor.

U-M great Steve Strinko’s long path to graduation ends tonight

Friday, April 29th, 2016


Steve Strinko banner(Photos provided by Steve Strinko)

Last week we brought you a preview of our partner, Rent Like a Champion’s story of former Michigan linebacker Steve Strinko graduating from Michigan more than 40 years after he left Ann Arbor early for the NFL. Today, with the University of Michigan’s commencement upon us, we bring you part two of Strinko’s long journey from football star to Michigan graduate.

Strinko left Michigan for the 1975 NFL Draft after being named first-team All-Big Ten, second-team All-America, and the team’s Most Valuable Player during the 1974 season. But a knee injury that he suffered during that season, in which Michigan went 10-1, tied with Ohio State for the Big Ten title, and finished ranked third nationally, doomed his NFL career.

The Detroit Lions selected Strinko in the ninth round, 219th overall, but complications from an off-season knee surgery landed him on the injured reserve list. When it didn’t heal properly, the Lions refused to sign him, despite his attempts to play through the injury and make the team. By the end of 1975, his NFL career was already over and he had never played a down in the league.

Without a degree and facing the sting of the end of his football career, Strinko “went on a wild hair chase,” moving to Florida and living for some time on his unemployment check from the Lions. He bounced around to Houston, Denver, Washington, D.C., and then back to Florida, working various jobs and battling addiction. He got married and moved to Fort Worth, Texas, where he lived for more than 20 years. He had “a few business successes but would tend to self destruct.”

In 2007, Strinko was deemed 100 percent disabled by the Social Security Administration and a few years later, finally entered recovery for his addictions.

“I can tell you unequivocally that coming to the place where I realized that I had to humble myself and surrender it all to God was the single most important decision I made,” Strinko told Maize and Go Blue on Wednesday night. “I had to dismiss all preconceived thoughts and ideas that I was in control of my life. I made a commitment to honor God and my family and I worked with experienced professionals who helped guide me through the process. I committed to a one-year residential treatment program that I chose and set in my mind that I was going to do whatever necessary to put my addiction behind me once and for all.”

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With the addictions behind him, Strinko set his sights on finishing his degree. He enrolled in online classes in the fall of 2014 and completed the necessary coursework to earn his Bachelors of General Studies degree.

So why, after all these years, did he go back and finish his degree?

“Really it was a combination of things,” Strinko said. “First, I had always had the desire to finish in the back of my mind. Second, being contacted by Sara Rechnitzer who works in Michigan’s Athletic Department and her explaining the Degree Completion Program and how UM would reimburse me for the costs associated with getting my degree. Finally, knowing I could complete all of my coursework through the accredited Liberty University was the deal clincher.”

Strinko admits that it wasn’t easy to resume course work after so many years.

“Getting accustomed to online courses was a little challenging in the beginning. I had taken three, four credit hour courses at Miami Dade College in 2010 so I had already had a little bit of an idea of what would be required. I have to tell you that at 60 years of age you get pretty set in your ways and spending hours upon hours reading and writing was the hardest aspect of the challenge.”

When Strinko returns to Ann Arbor this weekend, it won’t be the first time he’s been back since his playing days — he said he came back in 1989 for a Bo’s Boys 20 year celebration and a few more times over the past two years — but this visit will certainly be the most significant. He’s looking forward to sharing the occasion with his family, several out of town friends from high school who will be making the trip up, and several former teammates.

As he readied himself for the emotional trip, Strinko looked back on his playing days and counted the comradery with his coaches and teammates to be his fondest memory.

“The comradery, hands down,” he said. “Playing four years and only losing 3 games and the closeness that kind of success promotes is not doubt the best feeling one can have. Also, running out of the tunnel on game day in front of 100,000 fans is like no-other feeling one can get anywhere.  Finally, the friends beyond the team and the people in Ann Arbor are incredible.”

He also recalled one of his favorite stories about his coach, the great Bo Schembechler.

“In the summer preceding my senior year I had to take a summer school class in order to remain eligible. Unfortunately, my professor for that course went to Europe before officially entering the grade. Therefore, when we reported for two-a-days I was not eligible. The reason this was a big deal is that every senior is eligible to be voted on for captain.

“Bo called me into a separate meeting room before the announcement that we were voting for captains. He said, ‘Strinko, you cannot be considered for captain of this squad because you are as of right now not eligible.’ Of course I explained I had been given a four-hour “A” but to no avail. Not sure I would have been voted as captain but we will never know.

“This incident so irked Bo that he made me run ten, 100-yard dashes against him after the morning and afternoon two-a-day practices. He even gave himself a 10-yard head start. I will never forget on the first day as we lined up to race he turned and looked at me and said ‘for every one that I beat you, you will have to run ten more.’ He never beat me.”

Tonight, when Strinko receives his degree during the student-athlete ceremony at the Crisler Center, Bo will undoubtedly be looking down from above on the linebacker from Middletown, Ohio, who he once stole away from Woody Hayes. And despite the 42 year gap, Strinko isn’t about to look back and wish he had done things differently.

“I have never been one to have regrets about what I did or did not do in the past. I prefer to consider that wherever the journey took me, it was necessary for me to get to where I am today. Dwelling on what could’ve or should’ve been is a waste of time and energy.

“The reason the rear view mirror is so much smaller than the windshield is that it is much more important to have a vision of where one is going than to dwell on what is behind us. I will say that there is merit in learning from your past mistakes but only as those mistakes are used as a guide of what not to do in the future. The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”

Next week, we will finish this three-part series with a recap of Strinko’s graduation weekend experience and a look ahead at his current venture, FAN, Inc., which is helping the Michigan Football Alumni Network avoid the same pitfalls that tripped him up after his football career.

Michigan great Steve Strinko set to graduate, four decades later

Thursday, April 14th, 2016


Steve Strinko banner(Photos provided by Steve Strinko)

With commencement just two weeks away, most families of graduating seniors have likely already secured lodging for the weekend. But if you haven’t, there are still 18 houses available to rent through our partner, Rent Like a Champion, for as low as $500 for the weekend. Wouldn’t it be great to spend the weekend comfortably, celebrating together with family and friends, rather than cooped up in separate hotel rooms?

Former Michigan football standout Steve Strinko is doing just that when he returns to Ann Arbor to finally graduate, four decades after leaving school early for the NFL. Here’s a selection of a story Rent Like a Champion recently wrote and posted on their site:

Nearly 45 years after he first stepped foot on the Michigan campus, Steve Strinko is returning to Ann Arbor. Strinko won’t be wrapping up ball-carriers or intimidating quarterbacks like he used to for the Maize and Blue — he has more important business to take care of on this trip to the Big House. Steve Strinko is going to become a graduate of the University of Michigan.

“This is the culmination of everything I had hoped for – being able to go to Ann Arbor, and be with my friends and family,” Strinko says. “There are some people who will be there that have never given up on Steve Strinko.”

STRINKO’S ROAD TO ANN ARBOR

Strinko’s graduation day will complete a journey that would have never commenced in Ann Arbor if Woody Hayes had something to say about it.

Ohio State’s legendary coach hosted Strinko and his mother and father to watch Super Bowl V during Strinko’s senior year of high school. He desperately wanted the Ohio-grown blue-chipper to stay home for college, but even a delicious home-cooked meal by Woody’s wife, Ann, wasn’t enough to keep Strinko in the Buckeye state.

“Ann cooked a wonderful dinner, and it was one of those incredible afternoons that gives you an idea of who Woody was,” Strinko recalls.

But the Super Bowl watch wasn’t enough to convince Strinko to stay home. That school “up North” beckoned.

“Michigan wanted me to play linebacker, and Bo was great during the whole recruiting process,” Strinko says. “Woody for four years never called me by name – he always said ‘the SOB linebacker up there.”

To read the rest of the story, please visit Rent Like a Champion.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of this three-part series on Strinko next week as he looks forward to graduation day.
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About Rent Like a Champion:

Rent Like a Champion offers out town visitors homes to rent for weekends such as football and basketball games, commencement, and other special events. Their model, similar to vacation rental companies such as airbnb, allows home owners to make money by renting out their homes for these events. The main difference is that RLAC focuses on college towns.

Some of the benefits of renting include comfort of home, having your entire party together under one roof, communal spaces such as patios for barbecuing, and in some cases being within walking distance of the stadium.

Satellite camp ban shines light on SEC’s, NCAA’s self-serving interests

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016


Mark Emmert(LM Otero, AP)

Last fall, I posted up in the Starbucks on State and Liberty for a full day of interviews. In search of new writers for Maize and Go Blue I spoke with several current Michigan students — aspiring journalists with The Michigan Daily and engineering majors who enjoy writing alike — and alums interested in voicing their opinion on Michigan athletics.

I did the same in Chicago, Washington, D.C., and New York, and when all was said and done I brought three new writers aboard. I considered it a success. Not only did I improve my team, but I also gave three college students a chance to cover their favorite team. A chance that comes with media credentials and insider access only a small percentage get.

As I was planning to make this fall’s hiring trip bigger and better, the fat cats at MGoBlog petitioned the World Wide Web to ban blogs from doing so. MGoBlog, of course, can sit back and wait for great writers to approach them, while blogs like us, Maize ‘n Brew, Maize ‘n Blue Nation, and Maize and Blue News have to get creative in order to find good writers. They reasoned that they shouldn’t have to work harder to draw elite writers from their own territory of students and alums.

On Friday, the WWW approved a proposal that would require blogs to “hire only via the comments section on their own website or on websites normally used for blog hiring (Craigslist).”

The above scenario sounds completely absurd, doesn’t it? And while it’s completely fictitious, it’s exactly what happened with the NCAA’s banning of satellite camps last Friday. It’s not a perfect analogy given that student-athletes and prospective student-athletes aren’t employees. But that’s where the NCAA’s ruling is even more absurd than the fictitious blog scenario above.

The NCAA’s stated description is “a member-led organization dedicated to the well-being and lifelong success of college athletics.” One of the NCAA’s seven core values is “an inclusive culture that fosters equitable participation for student-athletes and career opportunities for coaches and administrators from diverse backgrounds.” One of the main pillars of the NCAA’s web page is opportunity, with a description that reads, in part, “More than 1,100 member schools are united around one goal: creating opportunities for college athletes.”

Every one of the items listed above is a direct contradiction to the NCAA’s ruling to ban satellite camps. Rather than inclusive, opportunity-creating camps that help the pave the way for student-athlete well-being and lifelong success, the NCAA issued a self-serving, opportunity-limiting decree inclusive of only a select few.

The outcry from both high school and college athletes since Friday describing the opportunities that satellite camps created for them to be seen by a wider audience of coaches, and thus, broaden their opportunities has been backed by other college coaches as well.

“Those are the only two reasons, to selfishly guard your recruiting base — and that’s the major motive — or laziness,” said Washington State head coach Mike Leach. “OK, so we’re going to elevate those over the interests of, in particular, low-income student-athletes and providing them an opportunity? It’s by far one of the most absurd things ever. If we’re even close to who we say we are, this idealistic sport, student-athlete, college football — if we’re even remotely close to what we say we are, that needs to be overturned immediately.”

Leach also questioned the supposed vote that saw his conference, the Pac-12, along with the SEC, Big 12, ACC, Mountain West, and Sun Belt, approve of the ban. According to Leach, “the vast majority of the schools in our conference were in favor of the satellite camps.”

Jim Harbaugh, whose publicity of his own satellite camps led to the ban, has yet to publicly comment about the vote. But rest assured he has something up his sleeve to counter it.

“In my America, you’re allowed to cross the state borders. That’s the America I know,” Harbaugh said last June amid criticism of his Summer Swarm satellite camp tour.

The fact that a select few can get a rule changed simply because someone else’s ingenuity was threatening their cozy spot atop the landscape is deeply troubling. But even more so due to the fact that it flies in the face of what their profession pretends to serve. And it shines a large spotlight on what NCAA president Mark Emmert, SEC commissioner Greg Sankey, ACC commissioner John Swofford, and others truly serve: themselves.

Lavall Jordan leaving for head coaching gig at Milwaukee

Thursday, April 7th, 2016


Lavall Jordan(Allison Farrand, The Michigan Daily)

Michigan assistant basketball coach Lavall Jordan has reportedly accepted the head coaching job at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Jordan has been at Michigan since the 2010-11 season, helping to guide the Wolverines to a record of 143-70. He has been instrumental in the development of guards Darius Morris, Trey Burke, and Derrick Walton over the past six seasons.

Prior to joining the Wolverines, he spent four seasons as an assistant at Butler and three as an assistant at Iowa. He graduated from Butler in 2001, where he starred for the Bulldogs and was a two-time All-Midwestern Collegiate Conference performer.

Jordan takes over a Milwaukee program that went 20-13 last season, but did not bring back head coach Rob Jeter. Jeter went 185-170 in 11 seasons as head coach, but the Panthers have not finished in the top three of the Horizon League since 2011-12.

“As we begin the process of searching for a new head coach, we will identify candidates who believe in our mission, possess high character and integrity and have a proven track record of continued success,” Milwaukee athletic director Amanda Braun said at the time.

Jordan certainly fits that description, though this will be his first head coaching job.

There have also been rumors of fellow assistant coach Bacari Alexander also leaving for a head coaching job — likely at Detroit — which will lead to a major shakeup in John Beilein’s staff.

New in Blue: 2017 RB O’Maury Samuels

Sunday, April 3rd, 2016


O'Maury Samuels(247 Sports)

O’Maury Samuels – RB | 5-11, 190 | Los Lunas, N.M. (Los Lunas)
ESPNN/A RivalsN/A 247: 3-star, #25 RB Scout: 4-star, #23 RB
247 Composite: 4-star #21 RB
Other top offers: TCU, Arizona, California, New Mexico, New Mexico State

Jim Harbaugh landed a commitment for the third straight day and the fifth time in the past week when Los Lunas, N.M. running back O’Maury Samuels pledged his verbal to the Wolverines on Sunday afternoon. He announced his decision on Twitter.

Samuels is a four-star according to Scout and a three-star per 247. Rivals and ESPN have yet to rank him. Scout lists him as the 23rd-best running back in the 2017 class, while 247 ranks him as the 25th-best running back and 338th nationally.

The 5-foot-11, 190-pound running back rushed for 1,306 yards for Los Lunas High School as a junior last fall, earning all-state honors. He then made his mark on The Opening Dallas regional last month, recording a 4.58 40-yard dash, 44.5-inch vertical, 4.14-second shuffle, and 43-foot power ball toss to post the nation’s highest SPARQ score, 138.30. That earned him an offer from Harbaugh — his only other offers at the time were in-state schools, New Mexico and New Mexico State — and also an invite to The Opening at Nike’s headquarters in Oregon.

When Michigan offered after his performance in Dallas, he was excited to get a big-time offer from a school like Michigan.

“I was very happy when Mr. Harbaugh offered me,” Samuels said. “Coach Tyrone Wheatley said I am a freak and I have a lot of great attributes. They said I would fit into their program. I was so happy because Michigan is a great program with some great coaches.”

Although California, Arizona, and TCU have offered since then, a visit to Ann Arbor for the spring game on Friday was enough to convince Samuels to go blue. He’s the 11th member of the 2017 class and joins fellow running backs Kurt Taylor and A.J. Dillon in the class.

New in Blue: 2017 DT Phillip Paea

Sunday, April 3rd, 2016


Phillip Paea(247 Sports)

Phillip Paea – DT | 6-4, 285 | Berrien Springs, Mich. (Berrien Springs)
ESPNN/A Rivals3-star #13 OG 247: 3-star, #25 DT Scout: 3-star, #26 DT
247 Composite: 3-star #32 DT
Other top offers: Oregon, USC, Michigan State, Notre Dame, Nebraska, Utah, BYU, Arizona

Michigan’s hot spring continued on Saturday afternoon with a commitment from Berrien Springs, Mich. defensive tackle Phillip Paea. The 6-foot-4, 285-pounder posted a succinct and pointed tweet to announce his commitment.

Paea is a three-star recruit according to Rivals, 247, and Scout, while ESPN hasn’t ranked him yet. Ravals ranks him as the 13th-best offensive guard in the 2017 class, while 247 ranks him as the 25th-best defensive tackle, and Scout as the 26th-best defensive tackle.

While his rankings don’t stand out just yet, his offer sheet does. Oregon, USC, Michigan State, Notre Dame, and Miami, to name a few, have offered him. Paea visited Michigan on March 24 and again for the spring game on Friday before committing the next day.

Paea is the 10th member of the 2017 class, joining quarterback Dylan McCaffrey, running backs A.J. Dillon and Kurt Taylor, tight end Carter Dunaway, offensive lineman Ja’Raymond Hall, fullback Chase Lasater, linebacker Joshua Ross, and defensive backs J’Marick Woods and Benjamin St-Juste.

New in Blue: 2018 TE/DL Leonard Taylor

Friday, April 1st, 2016


Leonard Taylor(247 Sports)

Leonard Taylor – TE/DT | 6-6, 258 | Springfield, Ohio (Springfield)
ESPNN/A RivalsN/A 2474-star, #3 DT Scout: 4-star, N/A
247 Composite: N/A
Other top offers: Ohio State, Notre Dame, Tennessee, Nebraska, Louisville, Penn State

Less than two weeks after landing a commitment from 2018 linebacker Antwuan Johnson, Michigan picked up his teammate, Leonard Taylor. The Springfield, Ohio tight end/defensive end pledged his commitment to Jim Harbaugh following Friday night’s spring game.

Taylor is rated as a four star according to 247 and Scout, the only of the four major recruiting services to have released their 2018 ratings to date. 247 ranks Taylor as the third-best defensive tackle in the class and the 22nd-best overall player in the class. No other site has ranked the 2018 class yet.

As mentioned in Johnson’s New in Blue post, Taylor plays for former NFL safety Maurice Douglass, who sent Roy Roundtree, Michael Shaw, Brandon Moore, Mike McCray, and Reon Dawson to Ann Arbor while at Trotwood High School. However, given that Johnson and Taylor are among the best 2018 players in the state of Ohio, Harbaugh will have to fight to keep them away from Urban Meyer over the next 22 months. Still, it’s great early momentum, and Harbaugh can build on that with a great season this fall.

New in Blue: 2017 S J’Marick Woods

Monday, March 28th, 2016


J'Marick Woods(Scout.com)

J’Marick Woods – S | 6-4, 196 | Florence, Ala. (Florence)
ESPN3-star, #25 S Rivals: 3-star, #31 S 2473-star, #30 S Scout: 4-star, #22 S
247 Composite: 3-star, #26 S
Other top offers: Florida, Tennessee, Mississippi State, Louisville, Duke, Kentucky, Penn State

Michigan continued its recruiting momentum with a second commitment before noon on Monday. Florence, Ala. safety J’Marick Woods pledged his commitment to the Wolverines just an hour and 23 minutes after Groton, Mass. running back A.J. Dillon did so.

Scout is the lone recruiting site to give Woods a fourth star at this point as they rank him the 22nd-best safety in the 2017 class. ESPN, Rivals, and 247 all give him three stars. ESPN ranks him as the 25th-best safety, while 247 ranks him 30th and Rivals 31st.

Woods received his Michigan offer last May, and after camping at Alabama last summer, took unofficial visits to Michigan in August and again in October for the Michigan State game. He took another visit to Michigan this past weekend and that was enough to convince him to give a verbal to the Wolverines over Florida, Tennessee, Mississippi State, Louisville, and others.

At 6-foot-4 and 196 pounds, Woods will provide a big presence in the defensive secondary as he’s already bigger than any safety on Michigan’s current roster. Dymonte Thomas is the most comparable in size at 6-foot-2, 195.

247’s Steve Wilfong agrees that Michigan got a good one:

“Woods is a very intriguing prospect for Michigan, a 6-foot-3, 205-pound free safety that is rangy and big playmaking ability, but it’s obvious to say he could develop into a unique and big-time linebacker on the next level. If Harbaugh and company could add Top247 safety Jaylen Kelly-Powell alongside Woods they’d be extremely happy with safety recruiting this cycle. The 247Sports Composite ranks Woods as the country’s No. 26 safety.”

Woods is the eighth member of the 2017 class, joining defensive back Benjamin St.-Juste and linebacker Josh Ross on the defensive side of the ball. The addition of Woods and Dillon propels Michigan’s 2017 class from 14th to eighth in 247’s team rankings.