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Posts Tagged ‘Michigan Recruiting’

New in Blue: 2018 QB Joe Milton

Monday, May 8th, 2017


(Scout.com)

Joe Milton – QB | 6-6, 222 | Orlando, Fla. (Olympia)
ESPN4-star, #8 QB Rivals: 4-star, #6 QB 247: 4-star, #12 QB Scout: 3-star, 29 QB
247 Composite: 4-star #10 QB, #243 nationally
Other top offers: Florida, Georgia, Miami, Tennessee, Ole Miss, Louisville, Missouri, Kansas State

Fresh off of a trip to Rome and the top NFL Draft haul in the nation, Jim Harbaugh continued the momentum by landing a commitment from Orlando, Fla. quarterback Joe Milton. Milton released a great commitment video on Sunday afternoon.


Milton is a four-star according to ESPN, Rivals, and 247, and a three-star according to the lone outlier, Scout. Rivals ranks him the highest as the 6th-best dual-threat quarterback in the 2018 class, while ESPN ranks him 8th-best, and 247 as the 12th-best pro-style. Scout ranks him as the 29th-best overall quarterback. Nationally, Rivals ranks him 113th overall, ESPN 124th, and 247 271st. He’s the 10th-best pro-style quarterback and 243rd-best overall player in the class per the 247 Composite.

At 6-foot-6 and 222 pounds, Milton has great size already as he finishes up his junior year of high school. As his commitment video demonstrated, he was originally from Pahokee, Fla., where Michigan landed several players in the past decade. His family moved to Orlando for better opportunities and he drew the attention of many of the top schools in the south. Ultimately, he chose the Wolverines over Florida, Georgia, Miami, Tennessee, and others.

Scout lists Milton’s strengths as arm strength, game management, playmaking skills, pocket awareness, running ability/mobility, and size, while listing his areas to improve as accuracy, decision-making, and release. They expanded on that.

“Milton is a bouncy athlete who is light on his feet, so you have to like his ability to evade pressure and extend plays with his legs. His size for the position is obvious, but overall, he is a good looking athlete who can provide that game-changing play under center. Milton also does a good job of transferring weight and stepping into his throws. He has packed on solid mass over the past year, and measures in at roughly 6-foot-5 when lacing up the cleats. He can continue to work on his accuracy on some of his intermediate throws, but flashes great ball placement when extending the field with the deep ball.”

Milton has been described as raw with a ton of upside, which is a perfect fit for Michigan’s roster, especially under Harbaugh’s tutelage. With Dylan McCaffrey in the class ahead of him and Brandon Peters a year ahead of that, Milton will have plenty of time to develop those raw skills to add to his already impressive frame. New offensive coordinator Pep Hamilton likened Milton to Steve McNair, who enjoyed a long NFL career, including the 2003 MVP award.

Milton is the eighth member of Michigan’s 2018 class, joining running back Christian Turner, offensive lineman Emil Ekiyor, linebacker Otis Reese, defensive end Aidan Hutchinson, and defensive backs Myles Sims, Gemon Green, and German Green.

New in Blue: 2018 DBs Gemon & German Green

Thursday, April 20th, 2017


(Rivals)

Gemon Green – CB | 6-2, 165 | DeSoto, Texas (DeSoto)
ESPN4-star, #42 CB Rivals: 3-star, N/A 247: 3-star, #35 CB Scout: 4-star, 17 CB
247 Composite: 3-star #32 CB, #338 nationally
Other top offers: TCU, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Colorado, Oklahoma State, Kansas State, Wisconsin

Just two days before crossing the Atlantic for the final week of spring practice in Rome, Italy, Jim Harbaugh picked up a commitment from a pair of twins. Gemon and German Green of DeSoto, Texas pledged their commitment to the Wolverines on Thursday afternoon.

Gemon Green is a four-star according to ESPN and Scout and a three-star per 247 and Rivals. Scout has him ranked the highest by far as the 17th-best cornerback in the 2018 class and the 181st-best player in the class. 247 ranks him as the 35th-best corner and 369th overall, while ESPN ranks him 42nd. Rivals hasn’t released its rankings yet.

Scout lists Green’s strengths as ball skills, body control, burst out of breaks, and size while listing his area to improve as backpedal quickness. Scout’s Greg Powers expanded on that in his analysis.

“If you are looking with a cornerback with plus size and the ability to lockdown the opposition’s No. 1 target, the[n] Green is a [corner] who is battle tested doing just that week in and week out. He also faces the best competition in practice each and every day as DeSoto sent multiple receiver to the P5 level. He is good playing close to the line of scrimmage with his long arms and physical style of play or he can drop back and be an effective zone-style defensive back. He reacts quickly and can make plays on the ball. He is more of a coverage guy, but does have the size to be an effective tackler.”

Green chose Michigan over TCU, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Texas, Colorado, Oregon, and Wisconsin, to name a few. Michigan was one of the first big schools to offer Green. When the Wolverines extended the offer on Feb. 7 he held offers from Colorado, TCU, and a few smaller schools. But his offer sheet started to blow up after that. He earned MVP of The Opening Dallas Regional in early March, earning an invitation to The Opening Finals from June 28-July 3.

German Green – CB/S | 6-2, 168 | DeSoto, Texas (DeSoto)
ESPNNR Rivals: 3-star, N/A 247: 3-star, #74 CB Scout: 3-star, 62 S
247 Composite: 3-star #87 CB, #812 nationally
Other top offers: Tennessee, Colorado, Oklahoma State, Houston, SMU, Fresno State, New Mexico

German Green is a three-star according to Rivals, 247, and Scout, and currently not rated according to ESPN. Scout ranks him as the 62nd-best safety in the 2018 class, while 247 ranks him as the 74th-best cornerback. He’s the 87th-best corner and 812th-best overall player in the class according to the 247 Composite.

Green picked up his Michigan offer on March 16, about a month after his brother, and that was enough to convince the package deal to head north. Green also held offers from Tennessee, Colorado, Oklahoma State, and Houston, to name a few.

The Green twins are the sixth and seventh commitments in Michigan’s 2018 class, joining fellow cornerback Myles Sims, defensive end Aidan Hutchinson, linebacker Otis Reese, offensive lineman Emil Ekiyor, and running back Christian Turner.

New in Blue: 2018 CB Myles Sims

Friday, April 7th, 2017


(Scout.com)

Myles Sims – CB | 6-2, 173 | Atlanta, Ga. (Westlake)
ESPN4-star, #17 CB Rivals: 4-star, #8 CB 247: 3-star, #38 CB Scout: 4-star, 11 CB
247 Composite: 4-star #17 CB, #133 nationally
Other top offers: Alabama, Auburn, USC, Oklahoma, Ole Miss, LSU, Stanford, Florida, Georgia

Michigan picked up its first football commitment in a month and a half when Georgia cornerback Myles Sims pledged to the Wolverines on Friday afternoon. He announced his intention to play in Ann Arbor on Twitter.

Sims is a four-star according to ESPN, Rivals, and Scout, and a three-star according to 247. Rivals ranks him the highest as the 8th-best corner in the 2018 class, while Scout ranks him 11th, ESPN 17th, and 247 38th. Nationally, Rivals has him as the 51st-best overall player in the class, while Scout has him 80th, ESPN 211th, and 247 390th. According to the 247 Composite, Sims is the 17th-best cornerback and the 133rd-best player in the class.

The Westlake High prospect chose Jim Harbaugh’s Wolverines over his home state Georgia Bulldogs. He holds offers from most of the major powers including Alabama, USC, Oklahoma, LSU, Stanford, and Florida, to name a few.

Scout likes Sims’ frame, length, and coverage skills while noting that he’ll have to add some strength, which is expected from most players coming out of high school. They expanded on that in their analysis.

“Sims is a long and rangy defensive back with the ability to play cornerback or free safety on the next level. With Sims, what stands out immediately is his frame and length. He covers a lot of ground and he can get his hands on a lot of footballs in coverage. He is still thin, so he needs to add mass and strength, but that should come in time. In coverage, he is best when playing off coverage. He can still improve his quickness in short space. He has great body control, he can make plays on the ball and he is a very smart defensive back in coverage. His tackling is solid.”

Sims is the fourth member of Michigan’s 2018 class, joining fellow Georgian, linebacker Otis Reese, offensive lineman Emil Ekiyor, and defensive end Aidan Hutchinson.

M&GB Scouting Files: 2017 UM hoops commit Isaiah Livers & MSU commit Xavier Tillman

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017


(Crystal Vander Weit, Kalamazoo Gazette)

A couple weeks ago, I was able to watch 2017 Michigan signee Isaiah Livers play for the third time in his senior season at Kalamazoo Central before he moves to Ann Arbor for the next few years.

In the first two outings I was able to catch, Livers and his Maroon Giant teammates completely outclassed the competition to the tune of a 71-36 blowout at Portage Northern and a 93-51 massacre over Loy Norrix. Livers showed flashes of potential, but watched from the bench in the fourth quarter in both lopsided contests.

Last Friday, however, was different, as the undefeated Grand Rapids Christian Eagles made the trip down U.S. 131 to close out the regular season at Central (boasting a not-so-shabby 17-2 record themselves). Christian, led by Michigan State big man signee Xavier Tillman, Oakland wing signee James Beck, and 2018 Division-1 guard prospect Duane Washington Jr., entered the game ranked No.1 in the state by MLive, and they lived up to that ranking, pulling out a 53-51 overtime nail-biter over the home team.

Enough of the game stories, though. On to the scouting! For a refresher, you can check out my scouting report on Livers after the Portage Northern game. This report will include stats and scouting for the Loy Norrix and GR Christian games, as well as a brief scouting report on Tillman as well.

Isaiah Livers vs. Loy Norrix (93-51 W):
16 points (7-of-9 FG, 2-of-4 3pt.), 8 rebounds, 2 assists, 2 blocks, 1 steal, 0 turnovers, 1 foul. DNP 4th quarter

Isaiah Livers vs. GR Christian (53-51 OT L):
10 points (4-of-11 FG, 2-of-4 3pt.), 5 rebounds, 1 assist, 2 blocks, 3 steals, 2 turnovers, 4 fouls

There is no questioning Livers’s potential. He has good size right now at 6-foot-8, 205 pounds and should be able to tack on a few more pounds of muscle to his frame, but there’s certainly room for improvement. Let’s break down some positives and minuses

Strengths

1. Shooting:
In my first game scouting Livers, the senior did almost all of his damage inside the arc, missing his only two three-point attempts. Against Portage Northern and GR Christian, however, the Mr. Basketball finalist showed why John Beilein and company consider him a can’t-miss prospect by pouring in four threes on eight attempts and using his smooth and consistent stroke to knock down a couple midrange jumpers as well.

Livers uses his plus size and a quick enough release to shoot over the defense, and when he’s feeling it, he can be lights-out. Livers drained two threes in the first quarter of Central’s victory over Loy Norrix on his way to 10 points in the opening stanza and another seven points in the first quarter of the loss to Christian, including a triple and a couple pretty jumpers. In those two games combined, the wing prospect was 7-of-9 from the floor and 3-of-3 from deep in the first quarter.

This should correlate well to his projected future role as a microwave off the bench in his early time as a Wolverine. To earn run under Beilein, especially as a freshman, a player must knock down open shots, and Livers has the knack to come out firing – and on fire – from the get-go. We’ve all seen what happens when a designated sniper can’t find the bottom of the net, too – Ibi Watson was supposed to have that role this year, but is just 1-of-18 from three-point land and hasn’t played meaningful minutes since mid-December. If Livers can come in right away and just knock down shots, he should earn 5-8 minutes as a freshman.

2. Athleticism:
Livers’ size and shooting make him an intriguing prospect, but his athleticism is what could make him a very good college player. Livers threw down a couple monster dunks over Loy Norrix, skied for an impressive late offensive rebound over GR Christian, and had a couple springy blocks in both games. He’ll never be the fastest guy on the court, but his physical skills and quickness in short spurts give Livers a leg up and some potential positional flexibility.

3. Hands:
An underrated part of any college prospect is the ability to reliably catch passes without bobbling the ball, particularly for big men. And while Livers will not be a post player in college, it is still important for shooters to be able to catch and release without a hitch. Livers is also able to use his quick hands and length to cause some havoc on the defensive end, anticipating passes and knocking the ball loose to lead to easy transition buckets or at the very least create more possessions for his team. In the three games I scouted Livers, he registered eight steals to just three turnovers.

Weaknesses:

1. Rebounding:
In talking about what Livers will bring to Michigan, Beilein repeatedly mentions the prospect’s need to get better on the glass, and I could not agree more. While often one of the biggest (and probably the most athletic) players on the floor, Livers shows very little desire to bang on the boards. He had one impressive offensive rebound against Christian, but the majority of his boards were of the defensive variety that essentially fell into his hands.

I caught Livers just watching with his hands on his sides far too often when a shot went up – little desire to box out, little desire to go up and get it. I don’t think he’s a prima donna, but he needs to be more gritty on the glass.

2. Aggressiveness:
In total, I saw Livers play approximately 72 minutes of basketball across three games (foul trouble limited his time against Christian). In those 72 minutes of action, Livers made it to the free throw line a measly three times – all against Portage Northern.

I’ve already detailed Livers’s lack of aggressiveness in the rebounding department, but his unwillingness to drive into the teeth of the defense in search of contact is equally worrisome for a guy that projects as a 3 or 4 in Michigan’s system.

Christian’s best player on Friday night was Beck, and partially because he was able to get to the free throw line a handful of times. Livers was content to shoot from the outside and defer to his more willing teammates. On at least one occasion, the lack of aggressiveness likely led to a crucial turnover against Christian, as Livers opted to hold onto the ball for too long and then retreat when a double team closed in as opposed to taking it right at them and drawing contact.

I like Livers’s handles for his size (room for improvement, but not a glaring weakness), but he needs to trust them enough to drive past the three-point line and into the paint, where he can use his size and athleticism to finish in close.

3. Defense:
I’m going to disagree slightly with Ace Anbender’s take from his recent MGoBlog post on Livers. Livers’ athleticism allows him to be a passable defender at the high school level, but you can spot areas where a college offense could take advantage of him. I think Livers plays fine help defense and shows flashes of being a decent shot-blocker right now, but I attribute that more to his size, length, and athletic advantage at the high school level. His on-the-ball defense leaves a bit more to be desired, however.

Livers doesn’t slide his feet well enough on defense, forcing him to defend at an angle rather than perpendicularly when his opponent gets a step on him, which eventually got him into foul trouble in the most important of the three games I watched. Livers needs to get lower to the ground defensively and make sure he uses his long arms to his advantage by cutting off the drive before it happens. Some added strength will also help on this end – Beck threw down a dunk in Livers’s grill early on in the Christian game.

Current Comparison:
While disagreeing with Ace on Livers’ defense, I think he’s spot on when it comes to comparing the 2017-18 freshman to a current Michigan player – it’s D.J. Wilson all the way. Like Wilson, Livers has plus size, length, and athleticism, and can stretch a defense as a bigger wing. He’s also fairly lanky and will have to put on some weight while needing some improvement on his ability to drive the ball as well. For comparison’s sake, let’s make a quick chart to show how I think Livers and Wilson stack up with each other as high school seniors (based solely on Wilson’s film at the time):

Isaiah Livers D.J. Wilson
Shooting X
Rebounding X
Passing X
Blocking X
Ball-handling X
Aggressiveness X
Agility X
Athleticism X X
Hands X

 


Xavier Tillman – PF | 6-8, 270 | Grand Rapids, Mich. (Grand Rapids Christian)
ESPN4-star, #11 PF Rivals: 4-star, N/A 247: 4-star, #22 PF Scout: 3-star, 29 C
247 Composite: 4-star #18 PF, #86 nationally
Other top offers: Indiana, Purdue, Ohio State, Iowa, Virginia Tech, TCU, Illinois

Xavier Tillman vs. Kalamazoo Central (53-51 OT W):
9 points (4/8 FG, 1/3 FT), 5 rebounds, 2 assists, 4 blocks, 3 steals, 5 turnovers, 4 fouls

Before seeing Tillman or Livers play, if you were told that the game you were going to watch featured two 6-foot-8 guys with one going to play for Tom Izzo and one going to play for John Beilein, you would know within a second of walking into the gym which prospect was which. Livers is tall and slender with a polished jumper. Tillman is a bulky and plodding 6-foot-8 big man who won’t dare take a shot beyond the free throw line – even in shootaround.

Once game action hit, however, I was disappointed in Tillman’s overall game at this point. He has good size and a wide body, but got winded very quickly and was frequently the last man up and down the court. Offensively, he has very little polish to his inside game, and failed to demand the ball even when matched up with much smaller defenders in an open post. Tillman actually entered the half with zero points on 0-of-3 shooting (including a missed dunk) and just one rebound before picking up a few buckets on pretty easy layups off the glass in the 3rd and 4th quarters.

The Grand Rapids native did not display many post moves, and while he is certainly physical down low, powerful on the glass, and showed good help defense, Tillman was rather careless with the ball and simply not fast enough for the Big Ten game at this point. Luckily for Izzo, Michigan State should have plenty of big men returning to give Tillman the chance to develop with a redshirt year. The high school senior picked up a couple fouls due to a lack of foot speed and getting winded, and needs to get in shape and get quicker. The closest comparison to Tillman on the Spartan roster currently is clearly Nick Ward, but Tillman lags behind Ward at the same time in their respective developments in just about every department.

New in Blue: 2018 DE Aidan Hutchinson

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017


(Isaiah Hole, 247 Sports)

Aidan Hutchinson – DE | 6-5, 234 | Dearborn, Mich. (Divine Child)
ESPN4-star, #11 DE Rivals: 3-star, N/A 247: 4-star, #5 SDE Scout: 4-star, 16 DE
247 Composite: 4-star #9 SDE, #204 nationally
Other top offers: LSU, Michigan State, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Boston College

Michigan picked up its first commitment since National Signing Day when Dearborn, Mich. native Aidan Hutchinson pledged to the Wolverines on Tuesday evening. He announced the commitment via Twitter just before 10pm local time.

Hutchinson is a legacy commitment, the son of former Michigan star defensive lineman Chris Hutchinson, so his commitment to his father’s school isn’t much of a surprise.

He’s a four-star recruit in the 2018 class according to three of the four major recruiting services. The lone three-star comes from Rivals. 247 Sports ranks Hutchinson the highest as the fifth-best strongside defensive end in the class, while ESPN ranks him as the 11th-best defensive end and Scout 16th. Nationally, ESPN has him 94th overall, 247 has him 97th, and Scout 202nd. Per the 247 Composite, he’s the ninth-best strongside end and 204th-best overall player in the class. But with nearly a year to go before signing day and a full senior year to play, there’s plenty of time to move.

Scout lists Hutchinson’s strengths as athleticism, frame, and intensity/effort while noting his area to improve as disengaging skills. They expand on that with a positive analysis.

“Great frame with plenty of room to fill in and has already started that process. Long arms. Fluid kid with flexibility and ability to bend. Can turn the corner and rush off the edge. Likely grows into a strongside end because he has so much room to add weight. Plays hard and plays physically. Still can improve technique with his hands, but physical tools and intangibles are all there.”

The 6-foot-5, 234-pound end committed to Michigan over Michigan State, LSU, Wisconsin, and Nebraska, to name a few. He’s currently ranked as the fourth-best player in the state of Michigan. He’s the third member of what figures to be a relatively small 2018 class, joining offensive lineman Emil Ekiyor and linebacker Otis Reese.

New in Blue: 2017 WR Nico Collins

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017


Nico Collins – WR | 6-5, 195 | Pinson, Ala. (Clay-Chalkville)
ESPN4-star, #21 WR Rivals: 4-star, #17 WR 247: 4-star, #29 WR Scout: 4-star, 24 WR
247 Composite: 4-star #23 WR, #136 nationally
Other top offers: Georgia, Alabama, Clemson, FSU, LSU, Ole Miss, Tennessee, Florida, Miami, Auburn

After plucking five-star defensive tackle Aubrey Solomon out of SEC country on Wednesday morning, Jim Harbaugh won another highly prized recruit right out of the back yard of the big boys in the SEC on Wednesday afternoon. Nico Collins pledged to the Wolverines on National Signing Day, capping the best recruiting classes in program history. He then announced it via Twitter.

Collins is a consensus four-star recruit according to the four major recruiting services and they’re all pretty much in agreement about where he is ranked. Rivals ranks him the highest as the nation’s 17th-best receiver, while ESPN ranks him 21st, Scout lists him 24th, and 247 has him 29th. Nationally, Rivals ranks him 120th, ESPN 150th, Scout 178th, and 247 200th. According to the 247 Composite, he’s the nation’s 23rd-best receiver and 136th-best overall player in the class.

Collins chose Michigan over Georgia and his home-state Alabama Crimson Tide. The 6-foot-5, 195-pound receiver also held offers from most of the South’s top programs including Clemson, Florida State, LSU, Ole Miss, Florida, Auburn, Miami, and more.

Scout lists Collins’ strengths as catching in traffic, hands and concentration, red zone weapon, size, and toughness, while listing his area to improve as elusiveness with catch. Scout praises his ability to make plays and be a deep threat, something Michigan’s passing offense has sorely lacked in recent years.

“An outside wide receiver who has shown the ability to make plays down the field or across the middle. A very dependable wideout who catches the ball well in traffic. Has ideal size and length. Is more of a deep threat. Likes to run deep routes and can get behind defenders. A long strider who covers a lot of ground. Not elite quickness. Solid blocker and a very tough wide receiver.”

Collins joins a great receiving class that includes the nation’s top receiver, Donovan Peoples-Jones, as well as Tarik Black, Oliver Martin, and Brad Hawkins to round out Michigan’s 2017 recruiting class.

New in Blue (again): 2017 DT Aubrey Solomon

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017


(247 Sports)

Aubrey Solomon – DT | 6-3, 305 | Leesburg, Ga. (Lee County)
ESPN4-star, #5 DT Rivals: 5-star, #2 DT 247: 5-star, #5 DT Scout: 5-star, #2 DT
247 Composite: 5-star #2 DT, #25 nationally
Other top offers: Alabama, Georgia, Auburn, Ohio State, Ole Miss, FSU, Florida, USC, Clemson

Michigan kicked off National Signing Day by landing its biggest fish left on the board. Leesburg, Ga. defensive tackle Aubrey Solomon committed to the Wolverines for the second time just before 10am Wednesday morning on ESPNU — and this time it’s for good.

Solomon had long been considered a Georgia or Alabama lean as he lives less than 200 miles from Athens and 250 miles from Tuscaloosa, but the 6-foot-3, 305-pound senior-to-be decided to head north instead after a long and winding recruitment. He first committed to Michigan last June following Jim Harbaugh’s satellite camp at his high school in Leesburg, Ga.

“I was in love with the football aspect of Georgia,” Solomon said at the time. “I was cool with players there, but at the end of the day, it comes down to what will help me 10 years, 20 years after football and Michigan provides the best opportunities for me.”

But he decommitted just two months later after Michigan mistakenly sent him a thank you for attending the summer barbecue, which he didn’t attend. They also spelled his name wrong. However, the work Harbaugh’s staff has done in the five months since then was enough to get him to re-up with the Wolverines.

Solomon is a five-star recruit according to three of the four major recruiting services with ESPN the lone outlier listing him as a four star. When he originally committed last June all four had him as a four-star. Rivals and Scout rank him the highest as the second-best defensive tackle in the 2017 class, while ESPN and 247 rank him fifth. Nationally, Scout has him the highest as the 11th-best recruit in the class. 247 lists him 30th, Rivals 31st, and ESPN 63rd. The 247 Composite has Solomon 25th overall and second-best defensive tackle.

Scout lists his strengths as athleticism, lateral range, quickness off ball, and suddenness, while listing his area to improve as pad level. They elaborate on that as well.

“An athletic defensive lineman who knows how to get off the ball. He is most effective with his quickness. He has good anticipation and he reacts quickly in the trenches. Really gets up the field. Can make plays in the backfield. Gets consistent penetration. Can use his hands, but needs to improve that, and his moves to counter offensive linemen. When he struggles, he tends to play high, so he can work on bettering his pad level. Just a quick defensive lineman who can make plays. Plays hard and plays fast for a guy his size.”

Solomon boasted offers from most of the major powers in the south, including Alabama, Georgia, Auburn, Florida State, Florida, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, in addition to Ohio State, USC, and more. He’s the seventh defensive lineman in the class, joining Corey Malone-Hatcher, Deron Irving-Bey, Kwity Paye, James Hudson, Luiji Vilain, and Donovan Jeter, and he’s the second-highest ranked player in the class behind receiver Donovan Peoples-Jones.

New in Blue: 2017 WR Oliver Martin

Monday, January 30th, 2017


(US Army All-American Bowl)

Oliver Martin – WR | 6-0, 188 | Iowa City, Iowa (West Senior)
ESPN4-star, #60 WR Rivals: 4-star, #35 WR 247: 4-star, #7 WR Scout: 4-star, 30 WR
247 Composite: 4-star #28 WR, #178 nationally
Other top offers: Notre Dame, Iowa, Michigan State, Ohio State, Oregon, Wisconsin, BYU

Michigan got most of its recruiting done before National Signing Day, leaving few surprises for Wednesday, and that trend continued on Monday night as Jim Harbaugh and staff stole a commitment from the backyard of another Big Ten school. Iowa City native Oliver Martin committed to the Wolverines at his high school with Harbaugh and new assistant head coach/passing game coordinator Pep Hamilton in attendance. He then announced it via Twitter.

Martin is a consensus four-star recruit in this year’s class by the four major recruiting services. 247 Sports ranks him the highest as the nation’s seventh-best wide receiver, while Scout ranks him 30th, Rivals 35th, and ESPN 60th. Nationally, 247 ranks him as the 170th-best overall player in the class, Rivals 206th, Scout 216th, and ESPN doesn’t have him in their top 300. He’s the 28th-best receiver and 178th-best overall player in the class per the 247 Composite.

The 6-foot, 188-pound receiver chose the Wolverines over Notre Dame. He also held offers from Ohio State, Michigan State, Oregon, Wisconsin, and BYU, to name a few.

Scout lists Martin’s strengths as competitiveness, hands and concentration, quickness off line, and route-running skills, while listing his area for improvement as frame. That means he’s already pretty polished and could add some muscle to fill out his frame at the college level. Scout expands on that.

“Very skilled, technical wideout. Excellent route runner with great hands and ability to make catches in traffic. Smart and understands how to get open. Very good athlete with good quickness, leaping ability and body control. Competitive, hard working kid. At 6-foot-1, 188 pounds, he has good size, but is not as big in comparison to other top outside receivers.”

With a pair of highly-ranked outside receivers already in the class in Donovan Peoples-Jones and Tarik Black, Martin is a perfect compliment as a slot receiver. Michigan hopes to land one more wideout on Wednesday in the form of Alabama native Nico Collins.

M&GB Scouting Files: 2017 U-M hoops commit Isaiah Livers

Friday, January 20th, 2017


(247 Sports)

On Jan. 6, I took the opportunity to see class of 2017 Michigan basketball commit Isaiah Livers when his Kalamazoo Central Giants faced the Portage Central Mustangs. Livers’ squad won 71-36 and the power forward finished with a stat line of 19 points (9-of-18 FG, 0-of-2 3PT, 1-of-3 FT), nine rebounds, two assists, four steals, one block, and one turnover in three quarters of action.

Here is my scouting report.

Isaiah Livers – PF | 6-8, 205 | Kalamazoo, Mich. (Kalamazoo Central)
ESPN4-star, #12 PF Rivals: 4-star, N/A 247: 3-star, #37 PF Scout: 3-star, 35 PF
247 Composite: 4-star #30 PF, #129 nationally
Other top offers: Michigan State, Maryland, Xavier, Butler, Creighton, Cal, Notre Dame, VCU
Strengths

1. Ball handling:
There’s little doubt as to where Livers ends up in John Beilein’s offense – he’s a wing through and through. With his size, however, you might expect Livers to man the post on a high school team like most of the biggest high schoolers do. But that is not the case. Livers’ role at Kalamazoo Central is very much an outside-in wing role with the ability to slash to the rim, post up smaller defenders when the opportunity presents itself, and take the deep shot when open.

Crystal Vander Weit, Kalamazoo Gazette

Perhaps his biggest strength at this stage, however, is his ball-handling. On multiple occasions, Livers collected a defensive rebound or received a quick outlet pass and took it coast-to-coast for a smooth finish. He’s very confident handling the ball in the open court and had little trouble with defenders trying to swipe the ball away despite weaving through sometimes three or four guys in one full-court attack.

2. Finishing:
Livers rarely missed when given a clean look within eight feet of the bucket, and used the glass effectively. There were a couple times when he missed awkward floaters only to rebound the misses himself and put it back up and in. The senior also had a monster one-handed alley-oop finish and another rim-rocking dunk when he found himself open underneath. When he has the chance to finish with a no-doubter, he does.

3. Court Vision:
Along with his ball-handling for a sizable wing, Livers impressed with his court vision and passing ability, setting up his teammates for wide open looks time and time again. He only ended up with two assists on the evening, but he could have easily added two or three more if guys were knocking down shots. Livers is certainly unselfish when the score doesn’t demand that he takes over, and Beilein will love his ability to find the open man.

My only knock on Livers here is that he seemed to get a bit too flashy with no-look passes that could have turned out to be turnovers, and certainly would more often in college. He needs to just trust his vision and make the clean dish when he sees an opening.

4. Size:
I’ve touched on this a bit already, but Livers looks to have solid size for a guy who will likely end up in the 3 or 4 wing position in Michigan’s offense. He has good length and height, enough leaping ability, and a good frame to put on some weight in Jon Sanderson’s strength and conditioning program. Livers is listed around 205 pounds right now. I would expect that his college playing weight ends up around 225-235 pounds, and he should be able to carry that just fine.

5. Hands:
This is often a trait that goes overlooked in basketball, but bad hands can just about spell doom for a college player. Livers has sure hands catching the ball cleaning on the wing and on post-ups and also displayed some very quick hands defensively, snatching four steals in the first quarter by baiting passes and swiping his hands in at the right moment. That trick won’t get you many turnovers at the next level, but Livers should still benefit from his good paws in college.

Weaknesses

1. Rebounding:
This is not to say that Livers was a bad rebounder – after all, he got nine boards in three quarters of play. But there’s plenty of room for improvement, especially for a player of his size. Livers rarely boxed anyone out and his only rebounds came when the ball bounced directly to him or when he rebounded his own misses that careened off the rim in his direction because he had at least a few inches on every Portage Northern player.

More often than not, Livers was ball-watching when a shot went up, and was actually boxed out by his opponents on occasion even on their end of the floor. I would like to see more grit down low from Livers and a desire from him to go after rebounds that are not in his zone.

2. Hustle/Grit:
Livers didn’t show a whole lot of hustle or grit in a game that was out of hand pretty early on. The 2017 Michigan signee seemed a bit lackadaisical defensively, while rebounding, and when not involved on the offensive end of the floor. That’s certainly not something that Wolverines fans will like to hear, given the current team’s seeming lack of effort on defense, and one game is not necessarily indicative of a player’s overall body of work, but I would have liked to see Livers pushing a little bit harder.

His athleticism and size made it very easy for him to have success even without giving 100 percent, but it was still notable to see Livers not even make it past half court on a handful of offensive and defensive possessions. To be fair, most of the time that happened was in fast-break situations, but I noted at least twice when Livers was the only man on the floor not past the timeline.

Livers was also not poor defensively and never got blown by, but his footwork and want-to could have been much better than what it was. You would expect a high school player with his size to really dominate on the defensive end and provide a blocking presence down low, but that was not the case.

X-factor

1. Shooting:
Livers has drawn praise for his shooting ability in the past, and he appears to have a nice, clean stroke, but he missed his only two three-pointers on this night and did almost all of his damage in the paint. I expect that he’ll develop into a fine shooter under Beilein, but there was not enough evidence in this game.

Overall

Livers is an intriguing prospect with a nice combination of size, ball-handling, and good enough athleticism to be a solid college player. He projects very well as a wing in John Beilein’s offense and should be able to develop as a backup for at least a season before getting a shot at a starting spot. I expect that Livers will end up at the 4, where D.J. Wilson will still have two years of eligibility remaining when Livers gets to campus, and Livers should see some spot minutes as a freshman with a relative lack of depth there right now.

Depending on where Charles Matthews ends up and how Ibi Watson progresses, Livers will also get consideration as a three-man when Michigan looks to go big. If Livers continues to develop, he should easily see starting minutes upon the beginning of his junior season in Ann Arbor.

New in Blue: 2017 OT Chuck Filiaga

Saturday, January 7th, 2017


(247 Sports)

Chuck Filiaga – OT | 6-6, 335 | Aledo, Texas (Aledo)
ESPN4-star, #14 OT Rivals: 4-star, #16 OT 247: 4-star, #13 OT Scout: 4-star, 15 OT
247 Composite: 4-star #14 OT, #98 nationally
Other top offers: Oklahoma, Nebraska, Alabama, Washington, USC, Ole Miss, Oregon, Auburn, Florida, UCLA

While Michigan awaits the decision of the nation’s No. 1 player, running back Najee Harris, the Wolverines received a commitment from another highly-touted guy on Saturday. Offensive tackle Chuck Filiaga pledged his commitment to Jim Harbaugh’s squad during the second quarter of the U.S. Army All-American game.

Filiaga is a consensus four-star recruit according to the four major recruiting services. All have him ranked similarly as 247 Sports ranks him as the 13th-best offensive tackle in the class, ESPN 14th, Scout 15th, and Rivals 16th. Nationally, 247 has him the highest as the 106th-best overall recruit in the class. Rivals ranks him 118th, Scout 125th, and ESPN 137th. He’s the 14th-best offensive tackle and 98th-best overall player in the class according to the 247 Composite.

The Aledo, Texas native chose Michigan over a top three that also included Oklahoma and Nebraska. He also held offers from most of the nation’s best, including Alabama, Washington, USC, Ole Miss, Auburn, Florida, Oregon, and more.

Scout lists Filiaga’s strengths as arm length, power and strength, and size, while noting his area to improve as technique.  Scout’s Greg Biggins expands on that.

“Two way lineman who could play on either side of the ball in college. We like him as an offensive tackle because of his length, long arms and athleticism. He has an ideal tackle frame, shows the feet to kick out and take on speed rushers but the strength to handle bull rushers as well. He is a talented defensive lineman and can get a push off the edge and moves around the line to take advantage of mismatches.”

Filiaga is the 27th member of the class, joining Andrew Stueber, Joel Honigford, Ja’Raymond Hall, Phillip Paea, Kai-Leon Herbert, and Cesar Ruiz as offensive linemen in the class. He’s the 13th commitment on the offensive side of the ball. National Signing Day is just three-and-a-half weeks away, on Feb. 1.