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Posts Tagged ‘Michigan Wolverines’

Michigan hoops preview: Michigan State

Saturday, January 31st, 2015


UM-MSU
Michigan (13-8, 6-3) vs Michigan State (14-7, 5-3)
Sunday, Feb. 1 | East Lansing, Mich. | 1:00 p.m. EST | CBS
Offense
64.8 Points/gm 73.5
(448-1,087) 41.2 Field Goal % 47.5 (574-1,209)
(163-461) 35.4 3-pt FG % 39.5 (156-395)
(238-321) 74.1 Free Throw % 63.1 (239-379)
11.9 FT Made/gm 11.4
31.9 Reb/gm 39.6
12.2 Assists/gm 17.4
9.9 Turnovers/gm 12.6
Defense
62.0 Points/gm 62.1
(459-1,050) 43.7 Field Goal % 38.2 (437-1,143)
(132-383) 34.5 3-pt FG % 30.4 (119-391)
33.8 Opp. Reb/gm 30.9
5.9 Steals/gm 5.8
1.9 Blocks/gm 4.2
Individual Leaders
Caris LeVert (14.9)*, Zak Irvin (13.6) Points/gm Travis Trice (14.0), Denzel Valentine (13.9)
Caris LeVert (4.9)*, Derrick Walton Jr (4.7) Reb/gm Branden Dawson (10.1), Denzel Valentine (6.1)
*Out for season

___________________________________________________________________________________

Michigan picked up its sixth conference win on Tuesday, beating Nebraska 58-44. Now, the Wolverines travel to East Lansing for the first of two meetings with rival Michigan State. A win would keep Michigan in second place in the Big Ten, just a game behind Wisconsin. A loss would drop Michigan into the middle of the pack. Let’s take a look at the Spartans.

The Starters
Minutes Points FG% 3FG% FT% Reb Ast TO Blk Stl
Travis Trice 33.1 14.0 38.8 37.3 69.6 3.5 5.5 1.6 0.1 1.3
Denzel Valentine 31.5 13.9 43.6 41.7 86.0 6.1 4.1 2.6 0.3 0.8
Branden Dawson 29.2 11.6 51.4 00.0 46.9 10.1 1.9 2.0 1.1 1.4
Bryn Forbes 28.9 9.8 50.0 47.3 83.3 1.4 1.2 1.1 0.1 0.8
Gavin Schilling 18.3 6.9 65.2 00.0 48.1 4.5 0.4 1.2 0.9 0.3
The Others
Minutes Points FG% 3FG% FT% Reb Ast TO Blk Stl
Matt Costello 19.0 7.6 60.4 00.0 70.5 5.6 0.7 1.1 1.0 0.3
Marvin Clark Jr. 11.2 5.4 52.6 37.1 73.1 2.5 0.1 0.9 0.5 0.2
Javon Bess 12.5 2.9 50.0 50.0 42.9 3.0 1.1 0.7 0.2 0.4
Lourawls Nairn Jr. 17.3 2.0 33.0 00.0 50.0 1.3 2.6 0.9 0.0 0.3
Alvin Ellis III 8.5 1.4 20.8 18.2 60.0 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.2 0.5
The Schedule
Date Opponent Score
Nov. 14 at Navy W 64-59
Nov. 18 #4 Duke* L 71-81
Nov. 21 Loyola (Ill) W 87-52
Nov. 24 Santa Clara W 79-52
Nov. 27 Rider# W 77-45
Nov. 28 Marquette# W 79-68
Nov. 30 #11 Kansas* L 56-61
Dec. 3 at Notre Dame^ L 78-79 OT
Dec. 6 Arkansas-Pine Bluff W 85-52
Dec. 14 Oakland W 87-61
Dec. 17 Eastern Michigan W 66-46
Dec. 20 Texas Southern L 64-71 OT
Dec. 22 Citadel W 82-56
Dec. 30 #12 Maryland L 66-68 2OT
Jan. 5 Indiana W 70-50
Jan. 8 at Iowa W 75-61
Jan. 11 Northwestern W 84-77 OT
Jan. 17 at #14 Maryland L 59-75
Jan. 21 Penn State W 66-60
Jan. 24 at Nebraska L 77-79
Jan. 29 at Rutgers W 71-51
Feb. 1 Michigan
Feb. 7 Illinois
Feb. 10 at Northwestern
Feb. 14 Ohio State
Feb. 17 at Michigan
Feb. 22 at Illinois
Feb. 26 Minnesota
Mar. 1 at #5 Wisconsin
Mar. 4 Purdue
Mar. 7 at #22 Indiana
*State Farm Champions Classic, #Orlando Classic, ^ACC/Big Ten Challenge

Michigan State has been up and down this season, playing Duke, Kansas, and Notre Dame tough in the non-conference, but also losing to Texas Southern and Nebraska at home. The Spartans also lost both meetings with Maryland and are still looking for a resume-boosting quality win. Beating Michigan won’t earn that, but it’s an important game for both teams’ postseason hopes.

The Series

Michigan leads the all-time series 97-77 and has won three of the last four meetings and six of the last nine. Michigan State leads in games played in East Lansing, 48-37, but the teams have split the last four meetings at the Breslin Center. Last season, Michigan won the two regular season meetings, topping State 80-75 on the road on Jan. 25, and winning 79-70 on Feb. 23. Michigan State got revenge in the Big Ten Tournament championship game with a 69-55 win over the Wolverines.

Notes

• Michigan State ranks tied for fifth in the Big Ten in scoring (73.5 points per game) and fifth in scoring defense (62.1)

• Michigan State ranks fourth in the Big Ten in field goal percentage (47.5 percent) and second in three-point percentage (39.5). The Spartans defense leads the Big Ten in opponent field goal percentage (38.2) and is tied for first against the three (30.4).

• Michigan State is the Big Ten’s worst free throw shooting team, shooting just 63.1 percent

• Michigan State leads the Big Ten in rebounding margin (plus-8.7) and assists (17.4 per game). The Spartans lead the conference in defensive rebounds (27.5) and rank tied for second in offensive rebounds (12.1).

• Branden Dawson leads the Big Ten with an average of 10.1 rebounds per game. He’s the only player averaging double-digit rebounds and leads the conference in both offensive rebounds per game (3.3) and defensive rebounds per game (6.8)

• Matt Costello ranks second in the Big Ten in shooting percentage (60.4)

• Travis Trice ranks second in the Big Ten in assists per game (5.5) and leads the conference in assist-to-turnover ratio (3.5)

• Bryn Forbes ranks second in the Big Ten in three-point shooting percentage (47.3)

Bellomy, Heitzman to transfer from Michigan

Friday, January 30th, 2015


Bellomy-Heitzman

Four days after running back Justice Hayes announced his intention to transfer, new head coach Jim Harbaugh granted two more fifth-year seniors-to-be a release from the program. Quarterback Russell Bellomy and tight end Keith Heitzman both announced on Friday that they will seek a grad-year transfer to play out their final season of eligibility.

Bellomy appeared in six games during his four seasons at Michigan, completing 4-of-23 passes for 46 yards, no touchdowns, and four interceptions. The Arlington, Texas native entered the 2012 Nebraska game late in the second quarter in relief of an injured Denard Robinson and struggled to move the ball as the Wolverines lost 23-9. In that game — the most extensive action of his career — Bellomy completed just 3-of-16 passes for 38 yards and three interceptions while rushing five times for no yards.

He missed his junior season due to a torn ACL suffered in spring practice and came into the Penn State game last season for two series in relief of Devin Gardner. On those series, he went 0-of-2, but most importantly, didn’t make a mistake to take Michigan out of field goal range. Matt Wile kicked a 42-yard field goal to tie the game at 13 late in the third quarter.

Heitzman played in 36 games in three seasons after redshirting in 2011. As a redshirt freshman in 2012, he appeared in 12 games as a reserve defensive end, recording seven tackles, one for loss, and recovering a fumble. In 2013, Heitzman started seven games at defensive end and played in all 12, recording eight tackles and half of a tackle for loss. Last season, he moved to tight end and caught two passes for 32 yards and one touchdown, which came against Indiana.

Both Bellomy and Heitzman expect to receive their degree from the University of Michigan this spring before transferring. Neither has picked a destination yet, but both stressed their love and appreciation for Michigan in Instagram posts on Friday afternoon. We wish both the best wherever they end up.

Click here to read Bellomy’s Instagram post. Click here to read Heitzman’s Instagram post.

Recruiting profile: 2015 QB commit Zach Gentry

Friday, January 30th, 2015


Gentry running
(Roberto E. Rosales, Albuquerque Journal)

Previously: 2015 TE Chris Clark, 2015 CB Iman Marshall

Zach Gentry – QB | 6-7, 230 | Albuquerque, N.M. – Eldorado
ESPN: 4-star, #9 Pro-QB, 83 rating Rivals: 4-star, #4 Pro-QB 247: 3-star, #16 Pro-QB Scout: 4-star, #19 QB
Other top offers: Alabama, Texas, Baylor, TCU, Tennessee, Oklahoma State, Louisville, Nebraska, Penn State

Jim Harbaugh’s second commit as head coach of the Michigan Wolverines, Zach Gentry, is a well-regarded recruit, in large part because of his prodigious size and potential upside. Gentry was previously committed to Charlie Strong and the Texas Longhorns, dating back to May of 2014, before decommitting earlier this month and committing to Wolverines on his official visit last weekend. Michigan was desperate at the quarterback position coming into this offseason, and now has early enrollee Alex Malzone and the newly committed Gentry appearing to be battling for the starting spot this fall, assuming Shane Morris doesn’t have a miraculous improvement this spring.

Arm Strength

Arm Strength - Zach GentryWhen speaking of towering quarterbacks, rocket-armed passers Joe Flacco and former Michigan Wolverine Ryan Mallett come to mind. It would be unfair to compare Gentry to either of these pros, as he simply does not have the cannon of arm that is expected of signal-callers who are taller than 6’6”. Gentry can stretch the field vertically by 50 yards at best, which is more than enough for most offenses, but is nothing special within itself. He can also throw it with nice velocity and spin to the sideline and over the middle, but isn’t going to sling it through a brick wall. Mechanically, Gentry’s arm action is somewhat of a concern as he has long arms which it make it difficult for him to get rid of the ball quickly and his release point is not always consistent.

Accuracy

Accuracy - Zach GentryIn terms of delivering the football with accuracy and anticipation to his receivers, Gentry is a work in progress. Once again, mechanics are an issue here as too often he will throw off of his back foot and will throw without first setting his feet. These are common issues which will affect ball placement and can be ironed out with coaching. Going back to his arm action, Gentry’s inconsistent release point can hinder his receiver’s ability to track the football out of his hand and cleanly field the ball. On the plus side, Gentry shows good touch on downfield throws and can drop the ball in a bucket when he is on.

Athleticism

Athleticism - Zach GentryAs a high school player, Gentry was a dual-threat, capable of making plays with his legs as well as with his arm, and frequently picking up huge chunks of yardage. Gentry is unlikely to carry this trait over to the collegiate ranks, however, a number of factors considered. While he is able to chew up yards with long strides, he is not explosive and lacks much shiftiness outside of weaving in and out of a straight line. Moreover, Gentry did not play against overwhelming athletic talent in the state of New Mexico, which could inflate how quick he looked on the field. Where Gentry’s ability likely will be able to carry over is his extending the play within and outside of the pocket to buy time to make the throw.

Intangibles

Intangibles - Zach GentryWith a player of his height, Gentry should have no trouble seeing over the line of scrimmage to read a defense (he is as tall as or taller than a lot of collegiate offensive linemen). From that point, however, Gentry is still a work in progress in terms of finding the right receiver to throw to and how patient he is waiting for routes to develop. As is, Gentry has some happy feet and is all too willing to take off and run without first exhausting his throwing options and keeping his eyes downfield should a receiver uncover late. Gentry is still a raw talent and has a lot of room to grow with how he processes the game, and with Harbaugh at the helm Gentry has come to right place to develop his skill set as a signal caller.

Bottom Line

While I may not be as big of a fan of Gentry as many others, there is some definite upside that Gentry brings as a recruit. My biggest concern with Gentry is that his size may have covered up a lot of his deficiencies at the high school level, as so many oversized washout players have had happen in their high school careers. The battle for Michigan’s starting quarterback job should be an interesting one, as it pits evil opposites Zach Gentry, a huge, raw, and mobile passer, against Alex Malzone, an undersized, but polished and accurate signal-caller. I expect the latter recruit to win the job, but Gentry is not someone who should be counted out.

MG&B Grade (out of 10)
8.3 (3-star)

New in Blue: 2015 quarterback Zach Gentry

Thursday, January 29th, 2015


eldo-manzano fb(Jim Thompson, Albuquerque Journal)

Zach Gentry – QB | 6-7, 230 | Albuquerque, N.M. – Eldorado
ESPN: 4-star, #9 Pro-QB, 83 rating Rivals: 4-star, #4 Pro-QB 247: 3-star, #16 Pro-QB Scout: 4-star, #19 QB
Other top offers: Alabama, Texas, Baylor, TCU, Tennessee, Oklahoma State, Louisville, Nebraska, Penn State

Just hours after Jim Harbaugh received his first commitment from defensive end Reuben Jones on Saturday evening, he landed a bigger splash with quarterback Zach Gentry. The Albuquerque, N.M. native and former Texas Longhorns commit flipped his commitment to Harbaugh’s Wolverines during halftime of the Michigan-Wisconsin basketball game and announced it via Twitter.

Gentry is a four-star recruit according to ESPN, Rivals, and Scout, and a high three-star according to 247 Sports. Rivals has him ranked the highest as their fourth-best quarterback in the class and 105th-best prospect overall. ESPN is close behind, ranking Gentry the ninth-best quarterback and 118th-best prospect. Scout lists him as the 19th-ranked quarterback and 278th overall, while 247 has him as the 16th-best quarterback and not ranked in their Top247.

While his ranking varies quite a bit among the recruiting sites, it’s largely because he plays in New Mexico, a state not exactly known for football, so the competition he faces each week isn’t the best. But with offers from the likes of Alabama, Baylor, Oklahoma State, Tennessee in addition to Texas and Michigan, it’s safe to say that if he played high school football one state to the East, he’d be ranked much higher.

Gentry’s size (6’7″, 230) is coveted at the college and NFL level, and with Harbaugh’s guidance he’s in a great spot to become the next great Michigan quarterback. But for now, he’ll enter fall camp as the low man on the totem pole, behind even classmate Alex Malzone, who enrolled for spring semester and will participate in spring practice.

Shuckin’: Michigan 58 – Nebraska 44

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015


UM vs Nebraska(MGoBlue.com)

Michigan is still looking for a signature victory after an overtime loss to Wisconsin on Saturday, but a 58-44 waxing of Nebraska without its two best players was a step in the right direction.

Derrick Walton, Jr. joined Caris LeVert on the bench Tuesday night with Michigan hosting Tim Miles’ Cornhuskers. But three of Michigan’s unheralded role players stepped up to shoulder the load.

Aubrey Dawkins paced the Wolverines in the first half, scoring 10 of the team’s 23 points to carry a five-point lead into the break. An ugly offensive showing by Nebraska was highlighted by a zero from Big Ten leading scorer Terran Petteway.

Michigan came out of the break hot, stretching its lead to 11 with an 8-2 run. Petteway scored his first point with 15:05 left in the game, but it was too late as the Wolverines had already built an 18-point lead.

Four Factors
Michigan Nebraska
54.3 eFG% 34.7
21.4 OReb% 22.2
22.7 TO% 17.5
17.4 FTR 28.6

A Shavon Shields layup cut the lead to eight with under six minutes remaining, but Michigan answered with a Max Bielfeldt layup and never let Nebraska back within 10.

Dawkins finished with 13 points for Michigan, second only to Zak Irvin, who dropped in 14 and grabbed a career-high 12 rebounds.

Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman helped Michigan ice the game with three fast break layups in the second half. He finished with nine points and four rebounds on four of eight shooting.

Bielfeldt put up 12 points and nine rebounds in 26 minutes off the bench. Starting center Ricky Doyle scored four points and grabbed two boards in the other 14 minutes.

Mark Donnal was sidelined with an upper respiratory infection, which has ravaged through the Michigan locker room this season.
Shields was the only Cornhusker to score more than seven points Tuesday, finishing the game with 14 points on just four of 12 shooting.

Petteway, who finished with seven points, snapped a 30-game streak of scoring in the double digits.

With Michigan up 14, Austin Hatch got into the game for 7.8 seconds.

The Wolverines moved to 6-3 in the Big Ten, good for fourth place halfway through the conference schedule. The wins have come against the six worst teams in the conference standings.

John Beilein will lead his team into East Lansing on Sunday for a matchup with Michigan State.

Final Game Stats
# Name FG-FGA 3FG-3FGA FT-FTA OR DR TOT PF TP A TO BLK S MIN
32 Ricky Doyle* 2-5 0-0 0-0 0 2 2 3 4 0 1 1 0 14
02 Spike Albrecht* 0-2 0-0 6-6 0 2 2 3 6 7 1 0 0 34
12 M-A. Abdur-Rahkman* 4-8 0-1 1-1 0 4 4 2 9 1 2 0 1 37
21 Zak Irvin* 5-12 3-7 1-1 1 11 12 0 14 3 1 0 1 38
24 Aubrey Dawkins* 5-7 3-3 0-0 0 2 2 2 13 1 2 1 0 32
03 Kameron Chatman 0-3 0-1 0-0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 8
04 Andrew Dakich 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 8
20 Sean Lonergan 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
30 Austin Hatch 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
44 Max Bielfeldt 6-9 0-2 0-0 4 5 9 1 12 0 1 0 0 26
Totals 22-46 6-14 8-8 6 28 34 14 58 12 13 2 3 200
Nebraska 15-49 4-19 10-14 8 18 26 12 44 6 10 2 3 200
Full Stats
Beilein Tie Watch
(Sam Sedlecky, M&GB)

(Sam Sedlecky, M&GB)

Near upset: #6 Wisconsin 69 – Michigan 64 OT

Sunday, January 25th, 2015


Michigan vs Wisconsin(Teresa Mathew, UMHoops)

ESPN’s College Gameday was in Ann Arbor for Michigan’s matchup with the Wisconsin Badgers on Saturday night, but that doesn’t mean anyone was really expecting a good game between the two teams at opposite ends of the experience spectrum.

The Badgers, led by the eccentric but outstanding Bo Ryan, came in as the 6th-ranked team nationally, boasting a lineup replete with size, experience, talent, and cohesiveness. Frank Kaminsky, a preseason All-American 7-footer, is arguably one of the three best players in the country, but he’s joined by fellow senior Josh Gasser, junior (and surefire first-rounder) Sam Dekker, and experienced sophomores Nigel Hayes — a skilled big man — and Bronson Koenig. Coming off the bench, Ryan prefers another senior and another pair of sophomores being weaned into a handful of minutes per game. On Saturday night, not a single visiting freshman checked into the game.

Wisconsin returned just about everyone coming off a trip to the Final Four last season, and they’ve looked the part so far this year, with their only losses coming to Duke and a puzzling fall at Rutgers, where Kaminsky sat out and point guard Traevon Jackson injured himself in the second half.

Compare that to this season’s Michigan outfit, which is now down to nine scholarship players and starts two freshmen, two sophomores, and a junior – along with a bench full of more freshmen and walk-ons – and you see why the Badgers entered the evening as double-digit favorites. And though the Wolverines were just one round away from dancing in Dallas with the Badgers, injuries and NBA attrition have forced coach John Beilein into playing multiple lineups with almost no experience; on Saturday night, five freshmen and two sophomore walk-ons logged minutes for the home Maize and Blue.

For much of the night, the inklings of the Badgers’ superiority proved accurate, with Wisconsin jumping out to an early seven-point lead, enduring Michigan’s first-half run, then bringing it back to seven at the break before opening the lead up to 11 four minutes into the second half.

Dekker used his 6’9″ frame and athleticism to shoot over and drive past the defense on his way to eight first-half points, Koenig knocked down three of four shots for seven, and bigs Hayes and Kaminsky pitched in six a piece before the break. Michigan also displayed some nice balanced scoring, with six different players getting on the board in the first half, but no one scored more than Max Bielfeldt’s six. The Wolverines stuck in the game by taking advantage of an uncharacteristic six first-half giveaways from the Badgers – prompting Bo Ryan to quip that he was pondering opening a bakery because of so many turnovers in one of the more bizarre jokes I’ve ever heard in a press conference – and an even more surprising five offensive rebounds, including three for Bielfeldt that were all put back up and made.

The sloppy play for the Badgers wouldn’t continue forever, though, as the visitors turned it over just once in the second half, allowing them to use their full possessions and dominate with their size. A couple times, Spike Albrecht was comically caught trying to body up Kaminsky, who had his way in the post for much of the game to the tune of 22 points on 8-of-13 shooting without a single triple attempt.

Four Factors
Michigan Wisconsin
49.1 eFG% 53.9
36.7 OReb% 29.0
15.4 TO% 13.7
22.2 FTR 37.3

Despite the odds, Michigan still fought back as they have so many times this season. Missing leader Caris LeVert for just the second game, the Wolverines seemed to move the ball a little better around the perimeter with less reliance on the three. After falling down early in the game, Bielfeldt stepped up down low for three offensive boards and buckets to help the home squad take a 17-16 lead before fellow big man Mark Donnal checked in to score four more quick points, including one bucket on a pretty 15-foot turnaround fadeaway baseline jumper to keep Michigan up two with 3:13 remaining.

The Maize and Blue wouldn’t score the rest of the half, however, while Wisconsin quickly reeled off nine points courtesy of a Hayes and-one and buzzer-beating three and a ferocious dunk from Dekker, who had to leave the court after converting the three-point play due to a sizable amount of blood coming from his hand.

Early in the second half, it looked like Wisconsin would finally escape the ties of Michigan’s dizzying array of defenses and run away with it, but four straight buckets from four different Wolverines and a pair of Derrick Walton free throws tied things up at 38 midway through the second half. A Bronson Koenig three finally halted Michigan’s 11-0 run, but Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman stepped right up and nailed a three of his own to knot it up again.

With a veteran savvy that is becoming increasingly rare in college basketball, however, the Badgers remained unfazed and immediately scored seven in a row to go up 48-41 with just 7:33 remaining. It looked like the book would finally be closed on the evening, but Michigan fought back valiantly with five straight from Zak Irvin and a huge pair of makes from Rahk and Walton to cut things to two with 22 seconds left right after Josh Gasser missed the front end of his 1-and-1 try.

Michigan, with no choice but to foul, sent Koenig to the line for a 1-and-1 opportunity, and happily saw the second miss. Walton quickly got fouled, drained a pair to cut the lead to one, then Aubrey Dawkins put Koenig back to the line for two.

This time, the sophomore made good on both to give Wisconsin a three-point lead with just 10 seconds remaining.

The Wolverines would have one chance to send it to overtime, and with Bo Ryan electing not to intentionally foul, Dawkins caught a pass from Walton on the left wing, went up to shoot – drawing two defenders – and deftly laid it back off to an open Walton on the left.

The shot hung in the air for a few memorable moments before finding nothing but net, causing Crisler to erupt in a deafening roar as Michigan took it to OT.

Unfortunately for the terrific crowd and the scrappy Wolverines, the dream comeback died shortly after. Frank Kaminsky started off the extra period with an incredible and-one finish over Ricky Doyle, then Josh Gasser hit a three after a Michigan turnover to put Wisconsin up six before Beilein’s team knew what hit them.

And although the Wolverines had mustered up comeback after comeback all night long, this lead proved insurmountable. Kaminsky would finish the overtime period with eight of his game-high 22 while Gasser pitched in the three and Dekker made one free throw, giving Wisconsin the 69-64 win.

After the epic battle, Beilein said there would be no moral victories taken despite the encouraging performance, but that Michigan will certainly learn from the loss and continue to key in on what they did well.

It’s hard to not see this game as a positive for Michigan performance-wise, though, even if they let another potential season-changing win fall through their grasp.

Nine different Wolverines scored, led by Derrick Walton’s 17, while only Wisconsin’s starting five got on the scoreboard. Particularly encouraging for Michigan also was the collective output of bigs Doyle, Donnal, and Bielfeldt, who combined for 19 points on 8-of-14 shooting and 13 rebounds, including six offensive, while doing about as well as you could hope against the likes of Kaminsky and Hayes down low. That pair scored 32 points, but it took them 23 shots to get there.

Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman (Rahk) was another bright spot, as the freshman scored nine points on four shots and showed positive signs for the third straight game, according to Beilein. Rahk continues to display a better grasp of the offense and greatly increased confidence, but perhaps most impressive has been the drastic improvement in his outside shot. The knock on the Philadelphia native coming in was his inability to provide a deep threat, and he certainly struggled shooting earlier this year, but his shot looks terrific right now, and he has not been afraid to take the big ones.

The Wolverines will now face a Nebraska team this Tuesday coming off a home win over Michigan State before a gauntlet of games awaits in February.

At this point, Michigan has lots of catching up to do in order to have even an outside shot at making the Big Dance, but if they can play like this on a nightly basis, there should be a few reasonable opportunities for big wins in the near future.

The first step has been taken. Now the effort must be sustained.

Quick Hitters:

• In his press conference, Beilein confirmed that Michigan was fouling on purpose at the end of the first half, but that, looking back on it, they executed very poorly. The Wolverines had two fouls to give, but the confusion started when Walton, who already had one foul on the night, picked up a second foul some 30 feet from the hoop with 19 seconds on the clock. Michigan fouled again with nine seconds remaining, but that still gave Wisconsin plenty of time to score, which they capitalized on with a corner three from Nigel Hayes.

The controversial strategy from Beilein is designed to take advantage of “free” fouls at the end of the half in order to give the other team very little time to get set up and finish with a bucket, but in order to work, Michigan would like to leave the team with four seconds or fewer to operate. By fouling with 19 seconds left, the strategy was destined to fail, as Michigan couldn’t possibly utilize just one more foul to give effectively with so much time left.

Three Stars:

***Derrick Walton Jr.***
17 points (4-of-12 FG, 2-of-5 3pt, 7-of-8 FT), five rebounds (two offensive), two assists, one steal, one turnover in 39 minutes

**Max Bielfeldt**
9 points (4-of-6 FG, 1-of-3 3pt, 1-of-2 FT), five rebounds (three offensive) in 13 minutes

*Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman*
9 points (3-of-4 FG, 1-of-1 3pt, 2-of-2 FT), two rebounds in 23 minutes

Final Game Stats
# Name FG-FGA 3FG-3FGA FT-FTA OR DR TOT PF TP A TO BLK S MIN
21 Zak Irvin* 5-15 2-6 0-0 1 1 2 0 12 2 1 0 1 40
24 Aubrey Dawkins* 1-3 1-3 0-0 0 3 3 4 3 2 0 1 0 24
32 Ricky Doyle* 1-3 0-0 2-2 1 4 5 3 4 0 0 0 0 23
02 Spike Albrecht* 1-4 0-2 0-0 0 1 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 25
10 Derrick Walton Jr* 4-12 2-5 7-8 2 3 5 4 17 2 5 0 1 40
03 Kameron Chatman 1-2 0-0 0-0 1 2 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 22
04 Andrew Dakich 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2
12 M-A. Abdur-Rahkman 3-4 1-1 2-2 0 2 2 4 9 0 0 0 0 23
20 Sean Lonergan 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
34 Mark Donnal 3-5 0-0 0-0 2 1 3 0 6 0 0 0 0 11
44 Max Bielfeldt 4-6 1-3 0-0 3 2 5 3 9 0 0 0 0 14
Totals 23-54 7-20 11-12 11 22 33 20 64 8 9 1 2 225
Wisconsin 24-51 7-21 14-19 9 21 30 12 69 12 8 1 4 225
Full Stats

New in Blue: 2015 defensive end Reuben Jones

Sunday, January 25th, 2015


Reuben Jones(247 Sports)

Reuben Jones – LB | 6-3, 223 | Lakeland, Fla. – Lake Gibson
ESPN: 3-star, #58 DE, 78 rating Rivals: 3-star, #27 SDE 247: 3-star, #64 SDE Scout: 3-star, #145 DE
Other top offers: Nebraska, Michigan State, Iowa, Louisville, West Virginia, Cincinnati, Duke, Wake Forest

It took longer than many expected, but Jim Harbaugh received his first commitment on Saturday evening when three-star defensive end Reuben Jones committed to the Wolverines on his official visit. The Lakeland, Fla. native had previously committed to Nebraska on Nov. 15, but became unhappy with the coaching change in Lincoln and announced his decommitment from the Huskers prior to visiting Ann Arbor.

On Saturday, he tweeted his commitment to Harbaugh’s Wolverines.

Jones is a consensus three-star recruit among the four major recruiting sites. Rivals ranks him the highest as the 27th-best strong side defensive end in the class and 68th-best player in the state of Florida. ESPN ranks him the 58th-best defensive end and gives him a rating of 78. 247 Sports lists him as the 64th-best strong side defensive end and 187th-best player in Florida. Finally, Scout has him as the 145th-best defensive end.

ESPN, Scout, and 247 each list his height and weight as 6’3″, 223, but Rivals has him slightly bigger at 6’4″, 225. According to Hudl, he has a Nike Sparq-verified 40-yard time at 4.89.

During his high school career at Lake Gibson, Jones recorded 212 total tackles (95 solo), 28 tackles for loss, 27.5 sacks, five forced fumbles, and four fumble recoveries. In his junior and senior years combines, Jones tallied 158 of those tackles, 25 tackles for loss, and 18.5 of those sacks.

Aside from Nebraska, Jones held offers from Michigan State, Louisville, Iowa, West Virginia, and Kentucky, among others.

Jones became the seventh commitment in the 2015 class but the first defensive lineman. He joins athlete Brian Cole and quarterback Alex Malzone — both early enrollees — as well as kicker Andrew David, defensive back Tyree Kinnel, and offensive linemen Grant Newsome and Jon Runyan Jr in the class.

Michigan hoops preview: #6 Wisconsin

Saturday, January 24th, 2015


UM-Wisconsin
Michigan (12-7, 5-2) vs #6 Wisconsin (17-2, 5-1)
Saturday, Jan. 24 | Ann Arbor, Mich. | 7:00 p.m. EST | ESPN
Offense
64.9 Points/gm 73.8
(425-1,033) 41.1 Field Goal % 48.9 (494-1,011)
(156-441) 35.4 3-pt FG % 35.8 (132-369)
(227-309) 73.5 Free Throw % 74.2 (282-380)
11.9 FT Made/gm 14.8
31.8 Reb/gm 34.4
12.4 Assists/gm 12.9
9.9 Turnovers/gm 7.8
Defense
61.6 Points/gm 54.6
(435-999) 43.5 Field Goal % 40.9 (399-976)
(125-362) 34.5 3-pt FG % 34.9 (90-258)
34.1 Opp. Reb/gm 27.6
6.1 Steals/gm 5.1
1.9 Blocks/gm 3.9
Individual Leaders
Caris LeVert (14.9)*, Zak Irvin (13.7) Points/gm Frank Kaminsky (16.9), Sam Dekker (12.6)
Caris LeVert (4.9)*, Derrick Walton Jr (4.7) Reb/gm Frank Kaminsky (8.2), Nigel Hayes (6.9)
*Out for season

___________________________________________________________________________________

Although Michigan’s postseason is hanging on by the thinnest of threads, the Wolverines stand just a half game out of first place in the Big Ten one-third of the way into conference play. Tonight, when Michigan hosts sixth-ranked Wisconsin in front of a nationally televised ESPN audience, it gets a prime opportunity to seize the quality win its resume lacks. Let’s take a look at the Badgers.

The Starters
Minutes Points FG% 3FG% FT% Reb Ast TO Blk Stl
Frank Kaminsky (F) 30.4 16.9 53.4 40.4 75.6 8.2 2.4 1.4 1.8 1.1
Sam Dekker (F) 27.4 12.6 52.7 35.6 69.0 4.9 1.2 1.2 0.5 0.3
Nigel Hayes (F) 31.4 12.5 55.3 36.8 69.6 6.9 1.9 0.9 0.6 0.7
Josh Gasser (G) 29.4 7.2 45.2 40.3 85.4 2.7 1.5 0.5 0.1 0.8
Bronson Koenig (G) 22.1 5.6 43.5 37.0 87.5 1.4 2.1 0.5 0.2 0.3
The Others
Minutes Points FG% 3FG% FT% Reb Ast TO Blk Stl
Traevon Jackson (G)* 27.4 9.4 45.6 28.6 85.4 1.7 2.9 1.6 0.2 1.1
Duje Dukan (F) 18.6 6.5 43.5 35.4 66.7 3.2 0.8 0.9 0.1 0.4
Vitto Brown (F) 8.8 2.8 48.8 00.0 58.8 2.1 0.2 0.4 0.3 0.3
Zak Showalter (G) 7.3 2.7 40.7 14.3 85.7 1.3 0.3 0.1 0.2 0.4
Riley Dearring (G) 3.1 1.0 40.0 42.9 00.0 0.2 0.1 0.4 0.0 0.1
*Injured
The Schedule
Date Opponent Score
Nov. 14 Northern Kentucky W 62-31
Nov. 16 Chattanooga W 89-45
Nov. 19 Green Bay W 84-60
Nov. 22 Boise State W 78-54
Nov. 26 UAB* W 72-43
Nov. 27 Georgetown* W 68-65
Nov. 28 Oklahoma* W 69-56
Dec. 3 #4 Duke^ L 70-80
Dec. 6 at Marquette W 49-38
Dec. 10 at Milwaukee W 93-54
Dec. 13 Nicholls State W 83-43
Dec. 22 at California W 68-56
Dec. 28 Buffalo W 68-56
Dec. 31 Penn State W 89-72
Jan. 4 at Northwestern W 81-58
Jan. 7 Purdue W 62-55
Jan. 11 at Rutgers L 62-67
Jan. 15 Nebraska W 70-55
Jan. 20 #25 Iowa W 82-50
Jan. 24 at Michigan
Jan. 31 at #25 Iowa
Feb. 3 #23 Indiana
Feb. 7 Northwestern
Feb. 10 at Nebraska
Feb. 15 Illinois
Feb. 18 at Penn State
Feb. 21 Minnesota
Feb. 24 at #13 Maryland
Mar. 1 Michigan State
Mar. 5 at Minnesota
Mar. 8 at Ohio State
*Battle 4 Atlantis, ^ACC/Big Ten Challenge

Wisconsin began the season as the favorite to win the Big Ten and opened with seven straight wins, capturing the Battle 4 Atlantis crown before falling to Duke in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge. Another winning streak carried the Badgers into Big Ten play before Rutgers of all teams stopped the streak at eight just two weeks ago. But Wisconsin responded with a 15-point win over Nebraska and a 32-point thumping of 25th-ranked Iowa.

The Series

Michigan leads the all-time series 91-67 and 56-21 in Ann Arbor. Last season, the teams split their matchups, each winning on the road. Michigan beat Wisconsin 77-70 at the Kohl Center and Wisconsin returned the favor 75-62 in the Crisler Center. John Beilein is 2-12 all-time against Wisconsin.

Notes

• Senior guard Traevon Jackson broke his foot in a loss to Rutgers on Jan. 11 and will miss tonight’s game. He had started 84 consecutive games

• Wisconsin ranks fourth in the Big Ten in scoring (73.8 points per game) and first in scoring defense (54.6). The Badgers’ plus-19.2 scoring margin also leads the conference

• Wisconsin ranks second in the Big Ten in shooting percentage (48.9) and seventh in three-point shooting (35.8)

• Wisconsin ranks 12th in the Big Ten in three-point shooting defense (34.9 percent), ahead of only Northwestern and Purdue

• Senior Frank Kaminsky ranks fifth in the Big Ten in scoring (16.9 points per game), second in rebounding (8.2), fifth in blocked shots (1.8), and first in defensive rebounds per game (6.6)

• Sophomore Nigel Hayes ranks fifth in the Big Ten in rebounding (6.9 per game)

Recruiting Profile: 2015 CB Iman Marshall

Friday, January 23rd, 2015


Iman Marshall
(247 Sports)

Previously: 2015 TE Chris Clark

Iman Marshall – CB | 6’2″, 190 | Long Beach, Calif. – Long Beach Poly
ESPN: 5-star, #1 CB, 92 grade Rivals: 5-star, #1 CB, #3 nat 247: 5-star, #1 CB, #5 nat Scout: 5-star, #1 CB
Other top offers: USC, Alabama, FSU, Oregon, LSU, UCLA, Auburn, Ohio State, Oklahoma, Miami, ND

One of the most talented and impressive physical specimens being recruited at the cornerback position this season, Long Beach Poly’s Iman Marshall looks to be Michigan’s number one quarry this winter. Marshall has yet to commit to any team thus far, but has either visited or has visits scheduled with Notre Dame, Florida State, LSU, Oregon, and Michigan, with USC also having mutual interest. Marshall sported the vaunted No. 2 jersey during his visit to Ann Arbor this past week, and could have a similar impact to Charles Woodson given the tools he would bring to Michigan if he does indeed commit to the Wolverines.

Athleticism

Athleticism - Iman MarshallMarshall has prodigious size as far as cornerbacks go, having a Nike verified height of 6’2″ (though listed at a shorter 6’1″ by many other outlets). While most defensive backs with 6-foot-plus frames don’t stick on the boundary as cornerbacks due to a lack of athleticism, there is no such concern with Marshall. The Long Beach native showcases very good range and downfield speed, and while he doesn’t have the most fluid of hips, he has flexible ankles and has good change of direction ability for a player of his size. Marshall might not light up stopwatches while running in shorts, but he carries his pads well on the field. Additionally, he has shown the athletic versatility to play as a receiver, with the ball in his hands, as outside corner, a nickel back, a deep safety, and as a kick returner.

Coverage

Coverage - Iman MarshallMarshall lined up most frequently in zone coverage as opposed to man coverage during his high school career at Long Beach, and seems best suited to zone going forward. Marshall has great length and demonstrated it often, frequently taking away passing windows and getting his hand in to break up would-be completions. His instincts and ability to read the play in front of him and the ball in the air are top-notch, which should translate into early playing time and success in college.

In terms of man coverage, Marshall lacks great change of direction and transition out of his backpedal, and could struggle to keep up vertically on an island versus the fastest and quickest receivers in college football. Marshall is not afraid to get physical in coverage, especially near the line of scrimmage, and has the length of a prototypical press corner. As a senior, Marshall was deployed as a single safety and charged with playing the center field which he manned capably.

Ball Skills

Ball Skills - Iman MarshallAs Marshall’s experience playing the wide receiver position at times throughout his career can attest to, he has very good ball skills, not only for the interception, but to catch passes on offense. Marshall doesn’t flash an outstanding catch radius or show off with eye-popping one-handers, but he has sure hands to pluck the football and the ability to put himself in position to do so. He adjusts well to passes thrown over his head and on his back shoulder. Marshall’s length and leaping ability are useful in competing for contested passes and high-pointing the football. When Marshall has the ball in his hands, he can be dangerous on interception and kick returns, showing shifty footwork and strength to ward off tackles.

Run Support

Run Support - Iman MarshallOne thing that can be infuriating while watching cornerbacks at any level of football is how noncommittal they can be towards playing the running game. This is certainly not the case with Marshall as he is an aggressive run defender who plays with strength and instincts. While Marshall could do a better job of getting off of blocks given his ability and the relative level of competition he faced, he pursues with great range and hustle. Marshall shows good tackling technique for a defensive back and wraps up while still delivering jarring hits on the football. With his combination of size and willingness versus the run, Marshall could convert to the safety position if needed by a coaching staff.

Bottom Line

Marshall may not possess blazing timed speed or the most explosive change of direction capabilities, but he stands out in every other category that is important to the cornerback position at the collegiate level. His great instincts will go a long way toward leveraging a role for himself on the football field and he possesses long-term potential to go pro within a few years. If Marshall does indeed sign with the Wolverines this winter, he could form one half of what could be a devastating duo at the cornerback position with last year’s five star recruit Jabrill Peppers. On the whole, Iman Marshall compares to former Virginia Tech and current Chicago Bears cornerback Kyle Fuller.

MG&B Grade (out of 10)
9.2 (5-star)

Following his visit to Michigan earlier this week, Marshall is visiting LSU this weekend and plans to wrap up his official visits with Oregon next weekend. Jim Harbaugh and staff plan to make an in-home visit to Marshall and his family — Marshall made the trip to Ann Arbor alone — before signing day on Feb. 4, but pulling him from hometown USC will be a tall order.

Stepping up: Michigan 54 – Rutgers 50

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015


Walton vs Rutgers(Jim O’Connor, USA Today Sports)

It’s no secret that Michigan’s basketball team has struggled mightily this season after losing three players to the NBA and two big guys – one to graduation and a second to transfer – off a roster that made it to the Elite Eight last season. But it would have been hard for anyone to predict just how bad it would get.

After slogging through a non-conference schedule that saw home losses to the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Eastern Michigan, among a handful of other defeats, the Wolverines entered Big Ten season not looking to do much. Somehow, though, Michigan managed to stitch together a 3-2 record – albeit with two blowout road losses – heading into Saturday’s home showdown with Northwestern. Again, the struggles continued, but the young Wolverines managed to pull out an ugly and unencouraging two-point victory.

But one day later, the season that seemed to have already hit rock bottom fell further into the ground with the announcement that star junior wing Caris LeVert, who led Michigan in points, rebounds, assists, steals, blocks, and minutes per game, would miss the remainder of the season with a broken foot suffered on the last play against Northwestern.

Fast-forward to tonight. Michigan would have to take to the road to face a team that defeated then-#4 Wisconsin two Saturdays ago and had given both Maryland and Minnesota good games on the road.

Michigan, clearly missing their star player, shoots 34.7 percent from the floor, 30.8 percent from downtown, and records 11 turnovers. Zak Irvin, Derrick Walton, and Spike Albrecht – what now must be considered the new “Big Three” – combined to make nine of 25 shots and just four of 15 triples while turning it over seven times. The Maize and Blue, as has become the norm this season, also suffered through nearly nine and a half minutes in the second half in which they could only manage one bucket, and five times went scoreless in three-minute periods.

And, oh yeah, at one point in the first half, Michigan’s lineup consisted of a sophomore walk-on who had played zero meaningful minutes to-date, another sophomore walk-on who was planning to redshirt so that he could eventually transfer to a smaller school for a fifth year and had not played a minute all season, a sparsely used freshman guard, another freshman who had lost his spot in the starting lineup due to increasingly poor play, and a third freshman who had fallen from first-game starter to third-string big man. Having trouble coming up with the names? That would be Sean Lonergan, Andrew Dakich, Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman, Kameron Chatman, and Mark Donnal, respectively.

As expected, Michigan got blown out by 30…won? Don’t ask me, I’m just as confused as anyone else.

But yes, you read that correctly – the Wolverines inexplicably pulled off a 54-50 road win at Rutgers despite a bevy of injuries, illnesses, and ineptitude to move to 5-2 in Big Ten play.

No Michigan player scored more than 12 points, but nine different Wolverines scored for just the sixth time all year and just the second time in conference play.

Michigan also managed to hold Rutgers to a putrid 35.8 percent mark from the floor and 29.4 percent from three.

The difference, however, might have been at the free throw line, where the Wolverines knocked down five more free throws (12) than Rutgers despite both having 14 total attempts. Derrick Walton, Jr. led the way there with a perfect 6-of-6 mark to ice the game away while finishing with a team-high 12 points.

Four Factors
Michigan Rutgers
42.9 eFG% 40.6
31.3 OReb% 35.1
19.2 TO% 19.2
28.6 FTR 26.4

It’s been a season of mostly downs for the Maize and Blue, and compounding the loss of the core of last year’s impressive team has been a rash of injuries and ailments. Both Walton and Albrecht have been suffering through lower body injuries throughout the majority of the season, LeVert is now done for the year with a broken foot (the same foot he broke last summer), Zak Irvin has been beat up in a couple games and is apparently ill, Albrecht missed Saturday’s game with an illness, and starting center Ricky Doyle once again could not go in the second half after looking completely worn out in just a couple minutes of play.

Rather than fold, though, Michigan has battled, and never more so than tonight. The Wolverines managed to hold onto a lead for the majority of the first half even with Zak Irvin glued to the bench with two fouls and a lineup that Tom Izzo would most certainly refer to as ‘weird’, and entered halftime up two behind five points and six rebounds from senior Max Bielfeldt and five points from freshman Aubrey Dawkins.

Irvin then came out of the break on a mission, netting five straight points in a minute and a half to put Michigan up four before Dawkins made a pretty driving layup and a free throw to give the Wolverines a seven-point lead – what would end up being the biggest of the evening.

Following the promising second half start came the all-too-familiar offensive drought for Michigan, however; after going up seven, the Wolverines scored exactly two points over the next 9:12 and suddenly found themselves down six to the equally listless Scarlet Knights.

I, though usually optimistic, simply could not envision a scenario in which Michigan could scrounge up enough offense to stage a comeback; in fact, I’ll even admit to doubting whether or not the visitors would score six points the rest of the way.

Yet within those final eight minutes, a light came on. Dawkins drained a huge three from the left wing to cut Rutgers’ lead in half before Derrick Walton and Spike Albrecht made back-to-back buckets – the first of the night for both – to tie it up at 42 with just under six minutes remaining.

After a couple more empty possessions on both ends, Walton knocked down his second triple in as many tries for Michigan and Bielfeldt unhesitatingly drained a trey of his own to mirror their earlier six-point deficit.

With three minutes left to make a final run, Rutgers had no chance of mustering up enough offense, and the Wolverines escaped.

Sure, the victory was far from pretty, and few problems appear to be truly solved, but John Beilein will certainly take a road win given the extreme circumstances. The win also marks the second time of Big Ten play in which Michigan has been able to take two of three games.

That’s a ratio that Beilein and squad would lovingly live with the rest of the way, but unfortunately the schedule is about to get a lot tougher.

Coming up this Saturday is a home tussle with Big Ten beasts Wisconsin that will feature as ESPN’s College GameDay contest. Another home game against lowly Nebraska closes out January before a brutal January consisting of at Michigan State, vs. Iowa, at Indiana, at Illinois, vs. Ohio State, vs. Michigan State, and at Maryland arrives.

For now, the Wolverines will enjoy the improbable victory, hope to heal up quickly, and focus on the Badgers. According to my friend and bracketologist Joe Cook, a win there would put Michigan near the bubble.

Perhaps it’s not what Michigan had planned on going into this season. But it’s certainly refreshing to see these Wolverines – no matter how young and battered they may be – continue to battle to stay alive.

Quick Hitters:

• One game after freshman Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman earned his first start in place of the ill Spike Albrecht on Saturday, classmate Aubrey Dawkins started his first career game tonight and made it count with 11 points on eight shots, three rebounds, and one block. Dawkins’s game continues to progress slowly after his coming out party against Illinois, and though he doesn’t do any one thing spectacularly yet, he’s shown enough to overtake the struggling Kam Chatman’s spot in the rotation. Dawkins’s shot looks good, his hops have propelled him to a couple nice rebounds, and his comfort level on both ends of the floor appears to be on the rise.

Perhaps the best play of the evening came on a terrific drive from Abdur-Rahkman midway through the second half in the middle of Michigan’s brutal scoring drought. The Philadelphia native was pressured all the way down the court and left to handle it on his own, nearly drew a 10-second violation, then blew by his defender without help and laid in a layup (something that hasn’t come easily to many Wolverines this season). Rahk also continues to earn more minutes, tallying four points in 14 minutes tonight.

 Ricky Doyle was clearly winded early on in the first half again as he continues to deal with an infection of some sort, but still managed three blocks in just seven minutes.

Three Stars:

***Derrick Walton Jr.***
12 points (2-of-8 FG, 2-of-7 3pt, 6-of-6 FT), seven rebounds, three assists, one steal, three turnovers in 30 minutes

**Aubrey Dawkins**
11 points (4-of-8 FG, 2-of-5 3pt, 1-of-2 FT), three rebounds (one offensive), one block in 31 minutes (career high)

*Max Bielfeldt*
8 points (2-of-7 FG, 1-of-3 3pt, 3-of-4 FT), eight rebounds (four offensive), one assist, one turnover in 22 minutes

Final Game Stats
# Name FG-FGA 3FG-3FGA FT-FTA OR DR TOT PF TP A TO BLK S MIN
21 Zak Irvin* 3-9 2-5 2-2 0 2 2 2 10 0 2 0 0 24
24 Aubrey Dawkins* 4-8 2-5 1-2 1 2 3 2 11 0 0 1 0 31
32 Ricky Doyle* 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 3 0 7
02 Spike Albrecht* 1-4 0-3 0-0 0 2 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 32
10 Derrick Walton Jr* 2-8 2-7 6-6 0 7 7 0 12 3 3 0 1 30
03 Kameron Chatman 1-3 0-0 0-0 2 0 2 1 2 0 2 0 0 8
04 Andrew Dakich 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
12 M-A. Abdur-Rahkman 2-4 0-1 0-0 0 0 0 1 4 1 1 0 0 14
20 Sean Lonergan 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 13
34 Mark Donnal 1-4 1-2 0-0 2 5 7 1 3 0 0 1 0 15
44 Max Bielfeldt 2-7 1-3 3-4 4 4 8 2 8 1 1 0 0 22
Totals 17-49 8-26 12-14 10 24 34 12 54 9 11 5 3 200
Rutgers 19-53 5-17 7-14 13 22 35 17 50 8 11 3 4 200
Full Stats