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Posts Tagged ‘Offensive line’

New in Blue: 2017 OT Chuck Filiaga

Saturday, January 7th, 2017


(247 Sports)

Chuck Filiaga – OT | 6-6, 335 | Aledo, Texas (Aledo)
ESPN4-star, #14 OT Rivals: 4-star, #16 OT 247: 4-star, #13 OT Scout: 4-star, 15 OT
247 Composite: 4-star #14 OT, #98 nationally
Other top offers: Oklahoma, Nebraska, Alabama, Washington, USC, Ole Miss, Oregon, Auburn, Florida, UCLA

While Michigan awaits the decision of the nation’s No. 1 player, running back Najee Harris, the Wolverines received a commitment from another highly-touted guy on Saturday. Offensive tackle Chuck Filiaga pledged his commitment to Jim Harbaugh’s squad during the second quarter of the U.S. Army All-American game.

Filiaga is a consensus four-star recruit according to the four major recruiting services. All have him ranked similarly as 247 Sports ranks him as the 13th-best offensive tackle in the class, ESPN 14th, Scout 15th, and Rivals 16th. Nationally, 247 has him the highest as the 106th-best overall recruit in the class. Rivals ranks him 118th, Scout 125th, and ESPN 137th. He’s the 14th-best offensive tackle and 98th-best overall player in the class according to the 247 Composite.

The Aledo, Texas native chose Michigan over a top three that also included Oklahoma and Nebraska. He also held offers from most of the nation’s best, including Alabama, Washington, USC, Ole Miss, Auburn, Florida, Oregon, and more.

Scout lists Filiaga’s strengths as arm length, power and strength, and size, while noting his area to improve as technique.  Scout’s Greg Biggins expands on that.

“Two way lineman who could play on either side of the ball in college. We like him as an offensive tackle because of his length, long arms and athleticism. He has an ideal tackle frame, shows the feet to kick out and take on speed rushers but the strength to handle bull rushers as well. He is a talented defensive lineman and can get a push off the edge and moves around the line to take advantage of mismatches.”

Filiaga is the 27th member of the class, joining Andrew Stueber, Joel Honigford, Ja’Raymond Hall, Phillip Paea, Kai-Leon Herbert, and Cesar Ruiz as offensive linemen in the class. He’s the 13th commitment on the offensive side of the ball. National Signing Day is just three-and-a-half weeks away, on Feb. 1.

New in Blue: 2017 C Cesar Ruiz

Monday, December 19th, 2016


(Andrew Ivins, 247 Sports)

Cesar Ruiz – C | 6-3, 315 | Bradenton, Fla. (IMG Academy)
ESPN4-star, #1 C Rivals: 4-star, #1 C 247: 4-star, #1 C Scout: 4-star, #2 C
247 Composite: 4-star #1 C
Other top offers: Florida, Auburn, Alabama, Oklahoma, Clemson, FSU, LSU, Georgia, Ole Miss, Texas A&M

After grabbing two of the nation’s top receivers last week in Tarik Black and Donovan Peoples-Jones, Michigan missed out on one of the top offensive tackles in Isaiah Wilson, who chose Georgia. Today, the Wolverines bounced back with a commitment from the No. 1 center in the nation, Cesar Ruiz. The Bradenton, Fla. resident pledged his commitment to Michigan just after noon Eastern on Monday.

Ruiz is a consensus four-star according to the four major recruiting services. All but Scout rank him the top center in the 2017 class, while Scout ranks him second behind Texas Tech commit Jack Anderson. 247 Sports ranks Ruiz the highest nationally as the 66th best overall player in the class. ESPN ranks him 69th, Rivals 77th, and Scout 100th. He’s the No. 1 center and 58th-best overall player in the class according to the 247 Composite.

Ruiz, who is originally from Camden, N.J., chose the Wolverines over a final group that also included Florida and Auburn. Michigan has long been considered the favorite to land Ruiz despite the 6-foot-3, 315-pounder holding offers from most of the nation’s top schools, including Alabama, Oklahoma, Clemson, Florida State, LSU, Georgia, Ole Miss, and Texas A&M, to name a few.

Scout lists Ruiz’s strengths as body control and balance, explosion, and quickness off ball, while listing his areas to improve as flexibility and technique. Scout’s Brian Dohn expands on that.

“Ruiz plays with a low pad level and explodes well. He is quick to the second level and his agility allows him to manipulate his body and make square blocks on smaller targets. He has a strong initial punch and once engaged, he drives his legs and turns the defensive play to open a hole. He retreats well in pass protection and he reads blitzes well. Adding more knee bend and getting his hands inside more are key to his development.”

Ruiz is the 23rd member of the 2017 class and the 11th on the offensive side of the ball, joining Ja’Raymond Hall, Andrew Stueber, Joel Honigford, Phillip Paea, and Kai-Leon Herbert as offensive linemen in the class. It’s rare for a true freshman to start on the offensive line, but with most of this season’s line departing and not much proven depth behind them, there’s a chance for that to happen next fall.

Predicting Michigan 2016: The offensive line

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016


Predicting Michgian 2016-OffensiveLine
Mason Cole(Melanie Maxwell, MLive.com)

Previous: Quarterbacks, Running Backs, Wide Receivers, Tight Ends

It’s not the most glamorous position on the football field, but no group will play a more important role than the offensive line for Michigan this season, especially with a new quarterback taking over and a heightened emphasis on running the ball.

Luckily for Michigan, it returns one of the most important qualities in an offensive line: experience. Four of the team’s five regular starters return for 2016 after Graham Glasgow was selected in the third round of the NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions.

The two unknowns heading into the offseason were who would take that fifth starting spot, and which reserves can step into a bigger rotational role.

Starting five

Four of Michigan’s five offensive linemen return after starting at least 12 games last season. The most solid, reliable player is fifth-year senior Kyle Kalis, who started all 13 games at right guard and elevated his play to near all-conference levels. Kalis has been a mainstay on the offensive line since his redshirt freshman season in 2013. Since settling in at right guard, Kalis has become a solid pass protector, but like much of the line, needs to take the next step to create the running game Jim Harbaugh envisions.

Grant Newsome played his way out of a redshirt as a true freshman in 2015 and now moves into the starting lineup (Melanie Maxwell, MLive.com)

Grant Newsome played his way out of a redshirt as a true freshman in 2015 and now moves into the starting lineup (Melanie Maxwell, MLive.com)

Fellow fifth-year senior Ben Braden takes up the other guard slot, coming off a breakout season in which he started 13 games and quietly put up some of the best performances on the line. Recruited as a tackle, Braden was hailed as a strong run blocker coming into Ann Arbor, but he’s done a nice job to date stopping the inside pass rush.

Both starting tackles return for the 2016 season, but with a bit of a twist. Fifth-year senior Erik Magnuson will lock down his familiar right tackle spot and be a major contributor on the line for a fourth straight season. He’s slowly turned himself into a strong edge blocker and enjoyed his best season under Harbaugh a year go.

But former starting left tackle Mason Cole will step into a new role for his junior year, though he’ll be just as crucial to this veteran line. After becoming Michigan’s first true freshman to start a season opener on the offensive line in 2014, Cole played left tackle in each of his first 25 games at Michigan. Now, he’ll step into Glasgow’s empty shoes as the starting center, a role he’s embraced this summer.

Michigan went through a disastrous period at center under Brady Hoke, struggling with the center-quarterback exchange, and at times, allowing defenders to get huge jumps off the snap. Cole will be critical in picking up the running game this season and shoring up the inside of the line. He’s a smart player and has the physical tools for a smooth transition, but Cole will be a player to watch when the Wolverines take the field Sept. 3.

Four starters down, and one question mark to go. The new kid at the starters’ table will be sophomore Grant Newsome, who takes over the vitally important left tackle position. Newsome is one of the best natural two-way blockers on the roster, coming into college as an excellent pass blocker and an able run blocker. He’s strong and explosive, but the key will be consistency and moving his feet off the edge on a play-by-play basis. Newsome will have his gaffs, like any young player, but as the season goes on, he’ll benefit from playing next to such an experienced group.

Projected Starters
Left Tackle Left Guard Center Right Guard Right Tackle
Grant Newsome Ben Braden Mason Cole Kyle Kalis Erik Magnuson
2015 Starts 1 13 13 13 12
Career Starts 1 25 25 29 24
Likely contributors

The starting five played a ton of snaps for Michigan last season, but there are a few returning players who contributed in the rotation. Perhaps the most seasoned backup, and a candidate for a starting role as a redshirt senior next year, is David Dawson. Dawson shared some time with Braden at left guard last season and held his own, especially in pass blocking. He’ll be an important depth guy in 2016.

Senior Patrick Kugler is in a similar situation, though his ceiling was much higher coming into Ann Arbor. The former five-star recruit played a backup role in 2015 and could provide some insurance if Cole struggles at center, which seems unlikely. Either way, the senior will play a role.

An interesting player to watch will be junior Juwann Bushell-Beatty, who played in only four games as a reserve lineman last season. The Paramus, N.J. native was just getting his feet wet last season, and passed his first college test. He might not take on a huge role this season, but look for Bushell-Beatty to make moves up the depth chart for 2017.

Ben Pliska played in two games last season, so his role could grow as a fifth-year senior in 2016. He can fill in at multiple positions on the line and gives Harbaugh another option if one of these contributors struggles or goes down with an injury.

Two linemen who didn’t play last season but should figure into the mix as redshirt freshmen are Nolan Ulizio and Jon Runyan. Both members of Harbaugh’s first recruiting class at Michigan, Ulizio and Runyan committed as three-star prospects. Ulizio fits the fits the typical Harbaugh bill — a smart, physical player who plays the position with a chip on his shoulder. Runyan is a little different, as he’s more of a quick, explosive lineman who may be a little undersized, but compensates with great technique. Expect both players to find a home in the rotation off the bench.

New faces

Michigan pulled in three new offensive line recruits in its elite 2016 class, led by Wisconsin’s finest, Ben Bredeson. That’s right, Harbaugh managed to pull a Wisconsin lineman away from the Badgers, and Bredeson is exactly what you’d expect from that ilk. One of the top offensive linemen in his class, Bredeson projects as a guard or tackle and could probably step into a bigger role if Michigan wasn’t so stacked with veteran lineman. Bredeson has decent size, but his value comes from his athleticism, which makes him an excellent run blocker. If he can bring his pass protection up to par, he’ll be a familiar face on the line over the next several years.

Harbaugh pulled another gem from the offensive line crop, snagging Michael Onwenu out of Cass Tech in Detroit. Onwenu is an absolutely enormous human who will play guard at over 350 pounds. He can pass block well for a big guy, but his specialty should be run blocking as he matures. It’s all power and strength with Onwenu, so his ability to learn the intricacies of the position will dictate his success at Michigan.

The third – and sometimes forgotten – man from this group is Stephen Spanellis, who committed to Michigan out of nowhere in January. Spanellis is just another big, strong lineman to add to the mix, joining the team at 6-feet-6 inches tall and around 300 pounds. He probably won’t play much of a role as a freshman, but the Baltimore native could factor in down the line.

Michigan also welcomed preferred walk-ons Anthony Kay, Carl Myers and Andrew Vastardis to the offensive line group.

Meet the rest

Greg Froelich: Senior, 6-2, 257, from Maplewood, N.J. (Deerfield Academy)
Greg Robinson: Freshman, 6-6, 290, from Hudson, Ohio (Hudson)

New in Blue: 2017 OL Kai-Leon Herbert

Wednesday, July 6th, 2016


Kai-Leon Herbert (247 Sports)

Kai-Leon Herbert – OT | 6-5, 284| Fort Lauderdale, Fla. (American Heritage)
ESPN4-star, #15 OT Rivals: 4-star, #10 OT 247: 3-star, #72 OT Scout: 4-star, #22 OT
247 Composite: 4-star #22 OT
Other top offers: Florida, Miami, Auburn, Ole Miss, LSU, Georgia, Tennessee, UNC, WVU

Michigan’s 2017 recruiting momentum continued on Wednesday afternoon with a commitment from Fort Lauderdale, Fla. offensive tackle Kai-Leon Herbert. With commitment videos all the rage these days, Herbert may have topped them all with a zombie-themed video on Bleacher Report.

He followed that up with an announcement via Twitter.

Herbert is a four-star recruit according to Rivals, Scout, and ESPN, and a three-star according to 247. Rivals ranks him the highest as the 10th-best offensive tackle in the 2017 class. ESPN ranks him 15th, Scout 22nd, and 247 is the outlier at 72nd. Nationally, Rivals ranks him as the 61st overall prospect in the class, while ESPN has him 106th, Scout 183rd, and 247 683rd. Per the 247 Composite, he’s a four-star, ranked as the 22nd-best offensive tackle and 166th-best overall player in the class.

Scout compliments his arm length, body control and balance, feet, flexibility, and intelligence, while noting his areas to improve as pad level and power and strength. They expand on that as well.

“Herbert is an offensive tackle with a great frame. His length stands out immediately and he has good feet to go with that. He has the body that is developing and with that, he will add mass and more power to his game. He can really move and get into his pass sets well. From his sophomore year to the end of his junior year, he added good weight, he played with more aggression, and he has really started to separate himself as one of the best in Florida. He is a very smart player and he is always working to get better. His flexibility is good and his punch has improved a lot. He could be a true left tackle on the next level.”

Herbert chose Michigan over home-state Florida and Miami. He also held offers from LSU, Auburn, Ole Miss, Georgia, Tennessee, and North Carolina, to name a few. Michigan originally offered the 6-foot-5, 284-pounder on May 1 of last year and he attended Michigan’s satellite camp at St. Thomas Aquinas High School last month. He followed that up with an unofficial visit to Ann Arbor the weekend of June 17 and from then on it was all Michigan.

Herbert is the 18th member of the 2017 class and the third offensive lineman to commit to Michigan in the past two weeks, joining Andrew Stueber and Joel Honigford, as well as Ja’Raymond Hall, who committed in December. Herbert is currently in Oregon competing in The Opening finals.

Predicting Michigan 2015: The offensive line

Thursday, August 13th, 2015


PredictingMichigan-OffensiveLine
Mason Cole(Melanie Maxwell, MLive)

Michigan’s passing game was severely flawed under head coach Brady Hoke, but perhaps the most concerning unit over the last few seasons was the offensive line.

Michigan, recently known for talented linemen like Jake Long and Taylor Lewan, bounced back from a disastrous 2013 season with a marginally better 2014. Michigan quarterbacks were sacked 27 times and the team rushed for an average of 4.6 yards per carry. The line wasn’t dominant, but with most of the core players returning, there’s certainly enough for new offensive line coach Tim Drevno to work with.

Here’s a look at Michigan’s offensive line unit heading into the 2015 season.

Probable starters

Kyle Kalis

Kyle Kalis looks to live up to his five-star hype this fall (247 Sports)

Michigan returns five offensive linemen who played a ton of snaps in 2014 and figure to make up most of the starting line to begin the upcoming season. At the head of the group, coming off a strong freshman season, is left tackle Mason Cole.

Cole became the first Michigan offensive lineman to start the season opener as a true freshman last August, doing so as Hoke’s left tackle. He started all twelve games and wasn’t overwhelmed in his first college season. The former Florida high school first-team all-state selection figures to be the rock of the offensive line and will hold down the left tackle spot, barring injury.

On the end opposite of Cole will likely be redshirt junior Erik Magnuson, who took a mini step back last season after starting seven games at guard in 2012. Magnuson is a solid run blocker, but the concern will be his ability to pass protect on the edge. At 6-foot-6 and nearly 300 pounds, Magnuson is strong enough to be a force for Michigan after an offseason working with Drevno and the new staff.

Kyle Kalis will likely nail down one of the two guard spots, probably on the right side, where he’s been featured most as a Wolverine. Kalis had a fantastic redshirt freshman season, but took a small step back in 2014. The former five-star recruit might be the most important lineman for the Wolverines as the coaching staff works toward his incredibly high ceiling.

Redshirt junior Ben Braden, who started all twelve games for Michigan, should take the other guard spot. Though he played in just two games through his first two years on campus, Braden won a starting job last fall and was solid throughout the season. He could definitely improve as a pass blocker heading into what figures to be his second full season, but Braden is strong in the creating for the run, which will be valuable in Jim Harbaugh’s offense.

Finally, Graham Glasgow will move to center and anchor this experienced offensive line, where he’s played on both sides throughout his career. Glasgow started the final 11 games of the season in 2014 after playing in all 13 games the previous year. Glasgow has been a staple on the line since midway through 2012, but a full-time switch to center will be one to keep an eye on. Glasgow played nine games at center in 2013, which was a disastrous season for Michigan’s pass protection. The 311-pound lineman is a strong inside blocker, but his adjustment to center will come with some bumps along the road.

Overall, Michigan’s starting offensive line should be strong and experienced, but its legacy will be written based on the ability to protect the quarterback. Denard Robinson and Devin Gardner weren’t the easiest quarterbacks to block for, but with a more conventional offensive scheme in place, Michigan fans will get a better look at what this line can really do.

Projected Starters
Left Tackle Left Guard Center Right Guard Right Tackle
Mason Cole Ben Braden Graham Glasgow Kyle Kalis Erik Magnuson
2014 Starts 12 12 11 7 5
Career Starts 12 12 24 16 13

Returning contributors

The offensive and defensive lines are the most important positions on the football field to build depth in. Elite offensive lines aren’t only identified by strong, durable starters, but also by a deep group of players who can step in a play meaningful snaps late in games.

Michigan doesn’t have many experienced players waiting in the wings behind the five starters mentioned above, but there’s a deep pool of talent to work with on the roster. One of the most interesting players to watch will be Patrick Kugler, a former five-star recruit who played only one game last season.

Kugler is only 6-foot-5, but he’s one of the more athletic linemen on the team and could fill in at any position on the line. That versatility will make Kugler a valuable backup option as any of the starters could need a blow during the game. Kugler could be an option to fill in at center if the Glasgow transition doesn’t go well.

Another versatile option behind Kugler is redshirt junior Blake Bars, who didn’t see the field in 2014. Bars was an all-state lineman as a senior at Montgomery Bell Academy in Tennessee and has the skillset to help out at an interior line position if needed.

Michigan could also get a boost from a trio of former four-star juniors who haven’t seen much of the field during their careers. David Dawson, who played in five games last year, is one of the few pass blocking specialist in the rotation and, as a result, has a good chance to make the regular rotation. Logan Tuley-Tillman and Chris Fox have only played in one game apiece, but could play a role, as they’re both huge and have raw talent.

The names on this list don’t jump off the page, but Harbaugh and Drevno certainly see a ton of potential in the backup offensive linemen. Barring a major injury on the starting line, these guys will spend another year adjusting to the college game by filling in and playing lesser roles when called upon.

New faces

The 2015 recruiting class brought three new faces to the offensive line. The most decorated of these recruits is Grant Newsome, a 6-foot-7 tackle out of New Jersey. Newsome is an explosive pass protector who could back up Magnuson at right tackle in a pinch. Though he’s one of the best linemen in the 2015 class, he’s a redshirt candidate behind Michigan’s experienced line.

The Wolverines also welcome three-stars Nolan Ulizio and Jon Runyan Jr. to the unit. Ulizio projects as a guard at the college level and Runyan could play anywhere on the interior line. Both guys are strong candidates to redshirt in 2015.

Meet the rest

Greg Froelich — junior, 6’2″, 270 from Maplewood, N.J. (Deerfield Academy)
Dan Samuelson — junior, 6’5″, 289 from Plymouth, Ind. (Plymouth)
Juwann Bushell-Beatty — sophomore, 6’6″, 319 from Paramus, N.J. (Paramus Catholic)
Ben Pliska — senior, 6’3″, 277 from Kirkland, Wash. (Lake Washington)

New in Blue: 2016 OT Devery Hamilton

Wednesday, June 24th, 2015


Devery Hamilton(247 Sports)

Devery Hamilton – OT | 6-6, 290 | Baltimore, Md. – Gilman
ESPN: 3-star, #33 OT Rivals: 4-star, #26 OT 247: 4-star, #23 OT Scout: 4-star, #13 OT
Other top offers: Ohio State, Michigan State, LSU, Stanford, Clemson, South Carolina, West Virginia, PSU

After missing out on four-star in-state defensive end Khalid Kareem Wednesday afternoon, Michigan received a pledge from four-star offensive tackle Devery Hamilton.

Rivals, Scout, and 247 Sports each gave Hamilton four stars, while ESPN currently has him as a three-star. Scout is the most optimistic, ranking Hamilton as the 13th-best offensive tackle in the 2016 class. 247 ranks him 23rd, Rivals 26th, and ESPN 33rd. Scout ranks him as the 144th-best overall recruit, while 247 has him 215th, as well as 233rd in their composite rankings.

The Baltimore, Md. native stands either 6’6″ or 6’7″ depending on which site you look at and his weight ranges from 265 to 291 pounds, though the latter is more accurate.

Scout’s Brian Dohn likes Hamilton’s size, length, and aggressiveness while noting that he has the ability to play on the defensive line as well:

“Hamilton can play offensive tackle or on the defensive line in college. He has the size and length to be a left tackle. He is aggressive and is able to disengage as a defensive lineman, and as an offensive lineman shoots his hands out is able to lock onto blocks and finish them. No matter the side of the ball, Hamilton plays hard and to the whistle. He chases plays down the field on defense, and gets to the second level on offense.”

Assuming Hamilton stays on offense, his commitment adds to an impressive offensive line haul so far for the 2016 class and shows where Jim Harbaugh’s emphasis lies in his first full recruiting class. He joins fellow four-star linemen Erik Swenson, Michael Onwenu, and Ben Bredeson, giving Michigan four of the top 26 linemen in the class according to Rivals.

As the 19th commitment in the class and the 13th this month, Hamilton’s commitment moves Michigan up to seventh in the 2016 class rankings according to both 247 and Rivals. Michigan is right on the heels of rival Michigan State in the 247 rankings, though the Spartans have one more commit at this point.

New in Blue: 2016 OT Ben Bredeson

Thursday, June 18th, 2015


Ben Bredeson(247 Sports)

Ben Bredeson – OT | 6-5, 293 | Hartland, Wis. – Arrowhead
ESPN: 4-star, #4 OT Rivals: 4-star, #4 OT 247: 4-star, #4 OT Scout: 4-star, #1 OG
Other top offers: Alabama, Auburn, OSU, MSU, LSU, Notre Dame, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Tennessee, Miami

June has become Jim Harbaugh’s month and it’s barely half over. On the heels of his Summer Swarm satellite camp tour, Harbaugh had already received seven commitments since the beginning of the month, and on Wednesday he picked up two more. Pembroke Pines, Fla. safety Josh Metellus committed to the Wolverines, and earlier in the day, big-time offensive tackle Ben Bredeson gave his pledge to Michigan.

Bredeson is a consensus four-star according to the four major recruiting services and ranked in the top 53 nationally by all of them. Rivals, 247 Sports, and ESPN each rank him as the fourth-best offensive tackle in the class, while Scout has him listed as the best guard in the class. Scout also ranks him the highest nationally at 25th, while 247 has him 29th, Rivals 49th, and ESPN 53rd.

The Hartland, Wis. native is listed between 6’4″ and 6’5″ and 280 and 293 pounds. Scout lists his strengths as ‘body control and balance’, ‘feet’, and ‘nasty streak’, while noting his area to improve is ‘power and strength’. They expounded on that in their analysis:

“Outstanding overall prospect with good technique and ability to bend. Has good flexibility in his lower body and has no issue winning leverage battles even against shorter defensive linemen. Plays with a mean streak and finishes his blocks strong. Can still polish up his pass pro, and add more strength up top, but has all the tools and the intangibles to develop into a top flight college lineman. Could play tackle or guard as well.”

Bredeson visited Michigan unofficially last summer and again in October for the Under the Lights game against Penn State — one of the few bright spots of the season. In February of this year he named his top four of Notre Dame, Michigan, Ohio State, and Wisconsin. He visited again the last weekend in May and decided to end his recruitment this week with his commitment to Michigan. He also held offers from Alabama, Auburn, LSU, Michigan State, and Oklahoma, among others.

As the ninth commitment in the first 17 days of June, Bredeson joins fellow offensive linemen Michael Onwenu, and Erik Swenson, running backs Kingston Davis and Matt Falcon, quarterbacks Brandon Peters and Victor Viramontes, tight end Sean McKeon, athletes Kiante Enis and Chris Evans, defensive backs Josh Metellus and Antwaine Richardson, defensive end Rashad Weaver, and linebackers Dele’ Harding, Dytarious Johnson, and David Reese.

Recruiting profile: 2015 OL signee Jon Runyan Jr.

Friday, February 20th, 2015


Runyan(MaxPreps)

Previously: 2015 TE Chris Clark, 2015 CB Iman Marshall, 2015 QB Zach Gentry, 2015 RB Karan Higdon

Jon Runyan Jr. – OL | 6-4, 276 | Philadelphia, Pa. – St. Joseph’s
ESPN: 3-star, #96 OT Rivals: 3-star, #45 OG 247: 3-star, #163 OT Scout: 3-star, #39 OG
Other top offers:

The son of the former Michigan and NFL offensive tackle of the same name, Jon Runyan Jr. committed to the Wolverines nearly two years ago, coming off just his junior year of high school. Runyan Jr. is significantly smaller than his father and is no lock to remain at offensive tackle in college (his frame profiles better on the inside), but he possesses the tools of a future Big Ten starter. Jim Harbaugh and offensive coordinator Tim Drevno stress physical and tough offensive line play, two things which Runyan Jr. has plenty of.

Athleticism

Athleticism - Jon Runyan JrRunyan Jr. doesn’t just have the frame of a big tight end, he has the athletic ability of one too. He has the quickness out of his stance and the overall movement skills that would be coveted by a team that is heavy on zone blocking schemes. Runyan Jr. moves very well laterally and downfield and his athletic talent aids him best as a moving run blocker more so than as a pass protector. He was used as an eligible receiver at times with St. Joseph’s and could be used in the same capacity with the Wolverines, either as an extra blocker or on a tight end screen. If Runyan Jr. can continue to improve his body and add strength without sacrificing much quickness, he will have an excellent physical base from which he can develop as a blocker.

Pass Blocking

Pass Blocking - Jon Runyan JrWhile he might have manned the blind side as a prep last season, don’t expect Runyan Jr. to do so at the next level, nor would he be expected to with Mason Cole holding down the job last year as a true freshman. Runyan Jr. simply doesn’t have the length or power to hold up at left tackle, and would be better served as an interior lineman or as a right tackle. His ability to anchor is a serious question considering he is a lightweight at this point in time and did not show any dominant ability to stonewall pass rushers. His height and arm length are also red flags and are below average for an offensive tackle. If Runyan Jr. can take full advantage of the strength and training program when he gets on campus he will be able to become an at least average pass protector and could contribute after a redshirt season.

Run Blocking

Run Blocking - Jon Runyan JrDon’t let his underwhelming size fool you, Runyan Jr. is a dominating run blocker. His ability to fight through the whistle and to block opposing defenders five yards downfield is impressive and should catch the eye of this coaching staff which will seek to impose a tough and physical mindset in the offensive trenches. Runyan Jr. gets into his blocks quickly and can generate movement off the line with sheer fight and effort. Even more impressive, however, is his ability to block on the move, which includes releasing off of double teams and getting out to the second level, and coming around the opposite side of the line on pulls. Runyan Jr. has an impressive ability to latch on to targets in space and is difficult to disengage from in the running game. His ability to open up holes and seal off defenders in the running game should allow him to play any of the four positions to the right of the blindside spot.

Technique

Technique - Jon Runyan JrFew offensive linemen come out of high school with good technique, let alone college prospects moving up to the pros, but Runyan Jr. shows solid technique for his level of play at this stage. Quick hands, balance, and leg drive allow him to maintain good positioning and engage with his opponents. He also shows clean footwork and solid angles to block on the move and at the second level. The biggest areas that Runyan Jr. needs to work on are his ability to maintain leverage and proper pad level, and better hip snap into contact. Overall, the fact that he is the son of a former offensive lineman is apparent in his play.

Bottom Line

The Wolverines have suffered from subpar offensive line play for the past few seasons and should be welcoming any new blood that can help shore up this area of weakness. However, Runyan Jr. is still at least a year away from contributing and needs some serious work in the weight room before he is physically up to snuff. I may only be giving Runyan Jr. a two star grade, but this an indication of what he can do now, and not necessarily what he can do in the future. From what I have seen, he could play a very good offensive guard or center, but as I have stressed, a lot of this comes down to the assumption that he can get bigger and stronger with a redshirt. All things considered, I wouldn’t be surprised to see Runyan Jr. crack a spot in the starting lineup as a sophomore.

MG&B Grade (out of 10)
7.8 (2-star)

Alex is currently a senior at UM-Dearborn and has a background in scouting and player evaluation, having learned from some of the best in the business. He contributes a weekly recruit profile/evaluation piece each Friday. Visit our Meet the Staff page to read more about Alex.

Kyle Bosch taking leave of absence

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014


Kyle Bosch(Melanie Maxwell, MLive.com)

Sophomore offensive lineman Kyle Bosch will take an indefinite leave of absence from the team according to a statement issued by Brady Hoke this afternoon.

“Kyle Bosch has taken a leave of absence for an undetermined amount of time for personal reasons,” Hoke said. “We ask that his privacy be respected at this time. We wish him the best and look forward to his return.”

Bosch started three games and played in five at left guard last season after enrolling early. The 6’5″, 303-pounder from St. Charles, Ill. has been listed as the second-team left guard so far this season and played as a reserve in the season-opening win over Appalachian State.

Michigan’s line, which was much maligned a year ago, looked impressive on Saturday, paving the way for 350 rushing yards and allowing just one sack. However, this Saturday will present a much tougher test at Notre Dame. The Wolverines do get Graham Glasgow back from a one-game suspension, which should help the depth concerns while Bosch is away.

As Hoke said, please respect Bosch’s privacy. Don’t tweet at him or publicly speculate on the reason for his absence. We wish him the best during this time.

M&GB season preview roundtable

Friday, August 22nd, 2014


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It has become our tradition at the beginning of each season to preview the upcoming season via a staff roundtable. We answer several questions with our predictions and expectations for what the season will bring. Drew has moved on, but we still have Justin, Sam, Derick, and Josh. We also invited our partner at MmmGoBluBBQ, Joe, to join us for the roundtable. We also invite you to give your answers in the comments below. Tell us what you agree with or disagree with. Next week we will begin our game week coverage.

What are you most excited about this season?

Justin: I’m most excited about what should be a very good defense. With so much talent and experience returning, it should be one of the top defenses in the Big Ten and may have to carry the team, at least in the early going. The best Michigan teams in recent history have featured stifling defenses — most notably 1997 and 2006 — and I think I can speak for most Michigan fans when I say I miss the days of Michigan having a dominating defense. It’s a major stretch to say this year’s unit could be as good as the 1997 one, but anywhere close would make for a very good season.

Michigan's defense won't be as good as the 1997 version, but it is one to be excited about

Michigan’s defense won’t be as good as the 1997 version, but it is one to be excited about

With most of the big questions on the offensive side of the ball, the defense is going to need to be very good, and if it is we have two recent examples that could foreshadow the upcoming season: Notre Dame in 2012 and Michigan State in 2013. Notre Dame’s offense ranked 80th nationally in scoring, 38th in rushing, and 72nd in passing that year but still made it to the national title game thanks to its defense. Last season, Michigan State’s offense ranked 63rd in scoring, 59th in rushing, and 84th in passing but still won the Big Ten and the Rose Bowl thanks to its defense. I’m excited for the possibility that Michigan’s defense, which should be more aggressive this fall, could carry the Wolverines to a special season.

Sam: I’m most excited about…football! After last year’s dreadful, seemingly never-ending season, I never thought I’d be so excited to see the Maize and Blue on the field just a season later, but I suppose hope reigns eternal right now. As far specific excitement about this team goes, I am really looking forward to seeing the whole defense working to live up to its enormous expectations. Every single position has an extremely strong two-deep, and every unit has at least one potential game-changer. With names like Frank Clark, Jake Ryan, James Ross III, and Jabrill Peppers, there’s no telling how good this defense could be. A consistent pass rush could mean a top-10 or even top-five defense nationally.

Derick: The most exciting storyline has to be the beginning of Jabrill Peppers‘ career in Ann Arbor. The No. 2 overall recruit has a chance to be a difference maker on defense and revive a kick return game that has been dormant since Steve Breaston left Michigan.

Josh: The defense and its personnel and scheme changes. I’d much rather see an aggressive, menacing defense with an average offense than an average defense with a high octane/high scoring offense. Luckily for Michigan it appears as though we just might get that menacing defense in 2014. That is something to be very excited about after we had to watch last year’s ‘bend but don’t break’ defense sit back and give up big gain after big gain.

Joe: I have a feeling that Coach Nussmeier will focus on building a strong run game with Green and Smith and help control the ball a little more than in recent years. Michigan has the horses to build an above avg. run game with these 2 and it will be fun to see if we can get back to a little smash mouth football at the big house. I’m also looking forward to some great BBQ on “Tailgate Tuesdays”.

What worries you most entering the season?

Justin: Okay, so this question is pretty rhetorical this year. The offensive line has to be the answer after last year’s meltdown and the loss of Taylor Lewan and Michael Schofield. If it’s as bad as last season, even a high-caliber defense won’t save the team. But I really don’t think it will be. Do I expect it to be a mauling, classic Michigan offensive line? Absolutely not. But I do think it will be more cohesive than last season and more sound with a simplified playbook. Even so, until we see it in action, the worry is there.

The huge question obviously lies with Erik Magnuson and the rest of the line (Matthew O'Haren, USA Today Sports)

The huge question obviously lies with Erik Magnuson and the rest of the line (Matthew O’Haren, USA Today Sports)

Sam: If anyone’s biggest concern at this point is not the offensive line, he or she may want a quick crash course in foot-ball (American style). I can say with a straight face that Michigan has some sort of chance of having a First Team All-Conference player at every single position on the field (yes, this is still optimistic, but it’s at least feasible in some universe) besides the offensive line, where Michigan may not have a single Third Team-caliber performer, feasibly. The line is replacing two senior tackles who will most likely start one day in the NFL; even with those stars, Michigan’s big uglies up front last year were atrocious. Most people have been taking the glass-half-full approach in saying that there’s no way it can get any worse; it’s hard for me to look at the names on paper and wonder how in the world it could get any better.

Derick: After watching the spring game and the ‘Under the Lights’ scrimmage, how can the offensive line not be the No. 1 concern? Michigan’s defensive line was average for much of 2013, but looked like an elite unit against their offensive teammates. If Doug Nussmeier can’t improve this group, it won’t matter how much Derrick Green and De’Veon Smith have progressed.

Josh: The entire offense. They say that on defense 10 guys can fail as long as one guy makes the play. But on offense 10 guys can be doing their job and if one fails, then the play is lost. While the o-line clearly needs to be a cohesive unit that plays well, it’s not all on them and there are too many variables to work out before they can be a solid unit. Devin Gardner needs to be consistent and the running backs (whomever they may be) need to run with vision and be decisive. I see Michigan in a similar situation as Michigan State was coming into 2013; a potentially great defense that would be enough to carry them but no identity on offense. Last year the defense played well but faded late in the season as it was completely worn down after carrying the offense all year and it really showed in losses to Ohio State and Kansas State I fear we’ll see more of the same this year.

Joe: The offensive line is a HUGE concern due to the loss of both Schofield and Lewan. It wasn’t exactly a strong point last year and now it looks even more troubling. This group needs to gel quickly and improve on the “tackles for loss” that plagued them last year. 114 is way too many!

Who will be the breakout player on offense?

Justin: I would absolutely love to look into the crystal ball and pick a lineman that breaks out and puts together an all-conference season, and while it’s certainly possible, it’s impossible to predict. I also think Derrick Green and De’Veon Smith will split the workload, keeping either from truly breaking out. Therefore, it has to be a pass-catcher, and I’m going to go with Jake Butt. He’s out for the first couple of games at least, but is progressing very well in his return form a torn ACL. We got a taste of what he’s capable of last season — 20 catches for 235 yards and two touchdowns — and once he returns, he could put up some solid numbers.

We all know Devin Funchess will be the go-to receiver for Devin Gardner, but he’s going to have to find others to distribute the ball to so opposing defenses can’t simply game plan Funchess out. It’s very likely that either Jehu Chesson or Amara Darboh breaks onto the scene, but as a tight end, I see Butt becoming a crutch for Gardner. Butt fits right into Nussmeier’s offensive system and could be primed for a big season as long as he fully recovers from his injury.

Sam: This one is pretty easy for me. I don’t think the offensive line is going to be good enough for Michigan to have a star running back, so I immediately look to the outside. There I find Amara Darboh, a gentlemanly sized 6’2″, 211-pound redshirt sophomore wide receiver who was held out all of last season with a foot injury. Devin Funchess is the closest thing the Wolverines have to a sure thing this year, so Darboh should have plenty of opportunities to take advantage of cheating defenses, and his nice hands, solid size, and football IQ should make him a favorite of Devin Gardner.

Derick: Freddy Canteen will probably have one of the greatest impacts on the offense, but I think Devin Gardner will be the breakout player. Gardner struggled for much of the 2013 season, but pressure from the defense and a non-existent rushing attack made his job much harder. A healthy Gardner should take advantage of a deeper receiving core and become the quarterback fans saw for a few games at the end of 2012.

Josh: I’m really down on the offense heading into this season. True, I’m not in Schembechler Hall, but nothing I’ve seen or read since last season has given me any indication that this offense will be any better than last year’s. A simplified system and zone blocking schemes will help but they haven’t had much time with Nussmeier and development takes time and many reps. Plus the mere fact that a TRUE freshman is in line to start at left tackle tells me that this line is still in shambles and that could derail the entire offense, again. That said, I think Jake Butt (once he returns) is prime for a breakout season. I foresee Gardner looking for a safety valve as he runs for his life behind an inept line and Butt should be that safety valve. We saw glimpses of what Butt could do late in 2013 and I expect him to pick up where he left off.

Joe: I am hoping that an in shape and focused Derrick Green turns into the five-star tailback we recruited two years ago. If he can pound the ball and help control the clock, this offense can put up some big numbers. An effective Green would free up some young receivers and an elite Funchess down field.

Who will be the breakout player on defense?

Justin: Yeah, it’s a pretty generic answer that I’m sure others will give, but I’m going with Jourdan Lewis. The hype coming out of the spring and fall camp is too much to ignore. The coaching staff has talked about being more aggressive defensively, and Lewis fits that mold at corner. If he truly has beaten out either experienced corners like Raymon Taylor or Blake Countess, he’s earned it and it will only make the secondary better.

Can Jourdan Lewis live up to the hype he has garnered throughout the offseason?

Can Jourdan Lewis live up to the hype he has garnered throughout the offseason?

Sam: Defensive breakout players are a little bit harder for me to predict, and I admittedly don’t even know who would rightfully qualify as a “breakout” player this year. Would a senior Frank Clark, who has been solid but never great, qualify? How about a junior linebacker who has been playing plenty of snaps for two full seasons? I’ll assume I’d get picked on for taking either of those guys, so let me go with Jourdan Lewis, a 5’10”, 175-pound sophomore cornerback from Cass Tech. If preseason reports and practices are to be believed, it seems that Lewis has managed to wrestle away a starting spot from either senior Raymon Taylor or redshirt junior Blake Countess, both of whom were pretty solid contributors a season ago. The coaches have been emphasizing increased physicality and aggressiveness on defense, particularly from the cornerbacks, which fits right into Lewis’s strengths. If he indeed plays the first snap on defense against Appalachian State next week, Jourdan Lewis must have something going for him.

Derick: It has to be Jabrill Peppers. If he can’t contribute in the secondary then Michigan will be vulnerable to the pass all season, since Blake Countess is the only proven cornerback that can cover Big Ten recievers.

Josh: Jourdan Lewis, and it’s not even close. Yes, I do think Jabrill Peppers will show us why he was one of the best incoming recruits in recent memory but my money is on Lewis to really make massive strides from last season. He got his feet wet last year while relying on great athletic ability but now he has the technique and mental aspect to add to it. I fully expect him to be an All-Big Ten performer, and one of the best defenders in the conference, by season’s end.

Joe: Can I say Jake Ryan as my breakout player? I know he is a team captain and a stud at linebacker, but after missing five games last year due to a torn ACL, he will shine all season if healthy. He is a must for this team to keep pace defensively.

Michigan will win the Big Ten if…

Justin: The offensive line improves to simply average and the defense is as good as advertised. The defense will have to carry the team early on while the offense finds its feet, but I truly believe this is a team that has a lot of potential. It will all rely on improvement from the offensive line, but like I said above, if the defense lives up to the hype, a 2012 Notre Dame or 2013 Michigan State season is not out of question.

Sam: Michigan will win the Big Ten if the defense doesn’t allow a single point. In all seriousness, the defense has to be elite (probably allowing 15 or fewer points a game in Big Ten play) and the offensive line has to be above-average for Michigan to compete for their first conference championship since 2004. I think the defense can be elite, but I still think the offensive line is going to struggle a little bit too much for the team to reach Pasadena or beyond.

Derick: Michigan will win the Big Ten if the quarterback pressure we saw throughout camp was actually because of the elite defensive line Greg Mattison has assembled. If the offensive line can actually protect Gardner and create holes for the running game then the rest will fall in place.

Josh: Michigan State and Ohio State completely implode and each have multiple conference losses, a miracle happens with the offensive line’s development early on, Devin Gardner finally becomes the consistently good QB we know he can be all while Jabrill Peppers exceeds the hype, plays both sides of the ball and becomes the first true freshman to win the Heisman (read: I don’t think it’s even remotely possible for Michigan to win the B1G Ten this year). I’ve said it many times before and I’ll say it again, Michigan won’t be ready to legitimately compete for the B1G Ten until 2015.

Joe: We can get strong and smart play up front, as well as from our quarterback position. We must eliminate the untimely sack or tackle for loss that killed us on important drives last season. C’mon O-line, make it happen!

What’s your prediction for the season? Record, who will Michigan lose to, what bowl game will Michigan play in?

Justin: Regardless of how much improvement the offensive line shows, I don’t see Michigan winning less than eight games this season. But I think they’ll win more than that and finish the regular season 10-2 with losses to Notre Dame and Michigan State. I don’t think Notre Dame will be that great this year, but early on Michigan will still be trying to get its offense up to speed, and despite a valiant effort from the defense, bad things just happen in South Bend. The latter because Michigan State is still the team to beat in the Big Ten this season and, while Michigan will play closer than they have the past two years, it will be extremely tough to pull one out in East Lansing.

I do think Michigan will go into Columbus at season’s end and pull off a big win, leaving a three-way tie atop the East Division, but Michigan State will get the nod into the Big Ten Championship game. Michigan will go to the Capital One Bowl. I never predict the outcome of bowl games before the season because so many variables come into play about who the opponent will be.

Our predictions range from 8-4 to 10-2 with the Capital One Bowl being the most likely destination

Our predictions range from 8-4 to 10-2 with the Capital One Bowl being the most likely destination

I’m optimistic about this season and think this team will be very close to having a really special season that will surprise some people, but in the end it will come up just short, setting up big expectations for 2015.

Sam: My final prediction for the 2014 Michigan football season is as follows:

Record: 10-2, losses at Michigan State and at Ohio State
Bowl game: Wherever generic 10-2 Big Ten teams end up this season (too many to keep track of).

I think it will be a successful season overall that falls just short of the ultimate goals of conference and national championships. Michigan State’s defense should be able to wreak havoc on the offensive line yet again, and though Ohio State will be without Heisman hopeful Braxton Miller all season, their backup will have enough time to gel by the end of the season that the Buckeyes will edge the Wolverines once again at home.

Derick: I think Michigan’s season should be pretty straightforward. The Maize and Blue are great in Ann Arbor, so an easy home schedule should translate into seven wins. But tough road games at Notre Dame, Michigan State and Ohio State make me shudder, and Brady Hoke’s resume on the road should turn all three games into losses. Michigan should take care of Northwestern and Rutgers on the road, giving it a 9-3 record for the season. Two Big Ten losses isn’t going to cut it for a trip to Indy, so Michigan will end up in the Capital One Bowl. Could Michigan win every single game on its schedule? Absolutely. But until fans see this team play solid football, there’s little reason to believe that more than nine wins are on tap.

Josh: My heart wants to be optimistic but my gut says this team’s lack of sufficient development spells doom in 2014. The offense has too many question marks for me to feel comfortable about having anything but very low expectations for them, which in turn puts more pressure on the defense to carry the team, again. The schedule does not set up in Michigan’s favor, with both MSU and OSU on the road (both of which are all but guaranteed losses in my mind). And as we’ve seen in the past Hoke’s teams consistently lose games they shouldn’t, mostly on the road (at Iowa in ’11, at ND and Nebraska in ’12 and atPSU, Nebraska and Iowa last year). They’ve gotten incredibly lucky against Northwestern the past two seasons and something tells me that luck may run out in 2014. Notre Dame, while losing several key players, is still on the road and that tilts the odds slightly in favor of the Irish. Utah could be a very dangerous trap game, sandwiched Miami (Ohio) and perennial bottom feeder Minnesota. Throw in the perennial inexplicable loss we’ve come to expect from Hoke’s Michigan teams and we’re sitting at 4 or 5 losses.

Right now I don’t see this team being better than 8-4, and not in the hunt for the East division. I see losses to MSU, OSU and then two more out of Notre Dame, Utah, Penn St. and Northwestern. They’ll still end up in a decent bowl because they’re Michigan, so something along the lines of the BWW Bowl like last year. Of course, I hope I’m completely wrong and the offense can come together and prove me horribly wrong but I won’t hold my breath.

Joe: I am predicting a 9-3 record for the Maize and Blue with losses at MSU, Northwestern and Ohio. Don’t ask me to explain the Northwestern loss, I just have a bad feeling. This will put them in the Outback bowl on Jan 1.