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Posts Tagged ‘Remy Hamilton’

Countdown to kickoff: 94 days

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014


Countdown to kickoff-94

Back to the way it was: Ohio State-Michigan feels like it used to

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012


On November 18, 2006, Michigan and Ohio State squared off in Columbus, both undefeated. Two titans with an unrivaled history found themselves in what was dubbed by the national media “The Game of the Century.” The Big Ten title and a spot in the BCS National Championship game were at stake. The game went back and forth like a heavyweight fight, but in the end, the scoresheet went in Ohio State’s favor.

The day before, the great patriarch of Michigan football, Bo Schembechler, had passed away, and along with him metaphorically went the program. Michigan went to Pasadena on New Years Day and got thumped by USC.

Bo's passing shook the rivalry and the Michigan program

Bo’s understudy, Lloyd Carr, decided to stick around for one more year. After all, he had a senior, fourth-year starting quarterback and running back, the eventual first overall NFL Draft pick at left guard, and a talented receiving corps. Who could blame him for giving it one last go-around? But a shocking loss to Appalachian State started the season, followed by a humiliating drubbing by Oregon and the Michigan program that had spent most of the previous season looking unbeatable had now lost four straight. The program that had seemed unshakeable for over 40 years was now suddenly lost without its figurehead.

The Wolverines rebounded with eight straight wins before dropping the final two to Wisconsin and Ohio State. In Carr’s swan song, Michigan faced a heavily favored Florida squad coached by Urban Meyer who relied heavily on his star quarterback. Carr pulled out all the tricks in the bag, using an offense almost foreign to the Michigan faithful and beat Meyer’s Gators.

Carr’s retirement a year after Bo’s passing signaled the end of Michigan football as we knew it and college football’s greatest rivalry suffered along with it. Ohio State beat Michigan by a combined score of 100-24 over the three years that followed while Michigan was guided by an outsider who many felt never truly understood the importance of the rivalry.

And so it was only fitting that it would take a Bo disciple to right the ship. Brady Hoke immediately returned the program to what it was like under Bo and followed in Bo’s footsteps by beating Ohio State in his first season. It ended Ohio State’s seven game winning streak over Michigan, but the Buckeyes were going through some troubles of their own. The great tattoo scandal sent Jim Tressel packing and left the Bucks headless last season, but led the man who was on the losing end of the final game of the old Michigan era to become the new head man in Columbus.

All he has done in his rookie season is not lose a game. Despite being ineligible for the postseason, OSU is ranked fourth in the AP poll and could conceivably be crowned national champions by the writers upon season’s end. Michigan faced a much tougher non-conference schedule which eliminated any national title hopes, but still holds hopes of a Big Ten title. And that’s just the way it should be: title hopes on the line, dreams either made or dashed.

Tim Biakabutuka's record performance ruined OSU's perfect season in 1995 (Larry E. Wright)

It’s the way it was so often throughout the past few decades. Something was always on the line, and more often than not, it was that way for both teams. The season-ending battle truly was the one game season.

Six times in the past 19 matchups, at least one of the two has entered The Game undefeated. Saturday marks the seventh and Michigan will be looking to do what it has done three times since 1993: hand the Buckeyes their first loss.

In 1993, OSU entered with a 9-0-1 record, it’s only non-win a 14-14 tie at Wisconsin. Michigan was just 6-4 with losses to Notre Dame, Michigan State, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The Wolverines played spoiler with a¬†resounding¬†28-0 win in what Ohio State head coach John Cooper called “by far the most embarrassing game I’ve been associated with in college football.” Tyrone Wheatley gashed the Buckeyes for 105 yards and Todd Collins played an efficient game. The defense picked off the Buckeyes four times and Michigan ended Ohio State’s 16-game unbeaten streak and hopes of an outright Big Ten title and handed the Bucks their first shutout since 1982.

Two years later, in 1995, Ohio State visited Ann Arbor with a 11-0 record and a No. 2 national ranking. Michigan was just 8-3. A Buckeye win would give them the Big Ten title and likely a national championship pending the Rose Bowl result. But yet again, Michigan played spoiler. Prior to the game, Ohio State receiver Terry Glenn mouthed off to the media that Michigan was nobody. But when the teams took to the field, Tshimanga Biakabutuka rushed for 313 yards, the most an Ohio State defense had ever given up to a single back as Michigan soared to a 31-23 victory. Once again, Cooper issued a strong statement, saying, “I don’t know if I’ve ever been as disappointed in my life as I am right now.”

Charles Woodson helped keep Michigan's perfect season intact against OSU in 1997

The following season, Michigan traveled to Columbus to face yet another unbeaten and second-ranked Ohio State squad. Michigan was 17-point underdogs and this time, Cooper kept his players from speaking to the media in order to prevent any bulletin board material. But Michigan didn’t need it. Ohio State jumped out to a 9-0 halftime lead, but wouldn’t score again. Michigan had to turn to Brian Griese due to an injury to starter Scott Dreisbach and he threw a 68-yard touchdown to Tai Streets. Kicker Remy Hamilton added a pair of field goals to give Michigan the 13-9 win. Following the game, it was Michigan cornerback Charles Woodson who did the talking, saying, “It was a great victory, to be able to look those people in the eye and say, ‘this is why I didn’t go to Ohio State’. I wanted to win at Michigan.”

In 1997, it was Michigan that carried the undefeated season into The Game. At 10-0 and ranked first in the nation, Michigan hosted the 9-1, fourth-ranked Buckeyes. The Big Ten title was on the line – either Michigan won it outright or the two shared it – and for Michigan, the national title was at stake. Michigan prevailed 20-14 on the heels of a great all-around performance by Woodson and advanced to the Rose Bowl where the Wolverines beat Washington State and captured the national title.

In 2002, Ohio State once again brought an unblemished record into the matchup. At 12-0, and ranked second, Ohio State needed a win to capture the Big Ten and advance to the BCS National Championship game. Michigan was 9-2 with losses to Notre Dame and Iowa. The Buckeyes held on, intercepting a John Navarre pass near the end zone to win 14-9 and eventually won the national title.

This Saturday, the rivalry has the ferver it did back then. Michigan needs a win and a Nebraska loss to advance to the Big Ten championship game. Ohio State needs a win to complete an undefeated season. The only thing holding the game back from receiving all of the national spotlight is the sanctions Ohio State is currently facing, keeping the Buckeyes from being able to win the Big Ten and play for the national title. But on the field, the two teams will battle it out just like the good old days and Michigan will hope to ruin Ohio State’s dream season for the fourth time in the last 20 years.

The man who has resurrected Michigan’s program with the Bo-like approach now faces off with the man who has transformed the Buckeye program. It has all the makings of a new “ten-year war” like the one Bo and Woody Hayes once fought with both programs at the top of their games. Most importantly, the game matters again. It’s back to the way it was.

Freshmen numbers and those who broke them in (Part 1)

Friday, August 3rd, 2012


[Ed.: This is the first of a three-part series on the uniform numbers the incoming freshmen will wear this season. For the full updated roster, click on the roster page on the right sidebar.]

Jersey numbers are the unique identifiers in team sports, but perhaps in no sport more than college football. We buy the jerseys of our favorite players and wear them proudly on game day, and the numbers of the superstars become symbolic long after the player’s days are done. Throughout the history of sports, players become known for the number they wore. Number two is Jeter, three is Ruth, seven is Elway or Mantle, 21 is Deion, 23 is Jordan, 42 is Jackie, 80 is Rice, 99 is Gretzky, and so on.

At Michigan, a new tradition was born last year to honor the legends who have made their number iconic. Desmond’s 21 was officially given “legend” status, and as we will find out this season, Oosterbaan is 47, Ford is 48, and Kramer is 87. Of course, Woodson’s two will soon be immortalized, as will Harmon’s 98 and surely others.

One of the highlights each fall before the season begins is the release of the numbers each incoming freshman will don. These are the guys we’ve heard so much about throughout the recruiting process and for the first time we can picture them in the jersey they’ll wear on the field. Some may make a name for themselves, some may not, but for four or five years we’ll get used to them in the number given. So let’s take a look at the numbers of each of the freshman and the Michigan greats who have worn them in years past.

#12 – Allen Gant

Ricky Powers wore #12 from 1990-93

Twelve will also be worn by quarterback Devin Gardner this season and was most recently worn by Roy Roundtree. It’s not a number that is widely recognized in Michigan lore, but it was worn by a talented running back from the early 1990s. Ricky Powers donned number 12 from 1990-93. He set the Michigan freshman rushing record which was later broken by Mike Hart and rushed for 1,251 yards in his sophomore season. He shared the backfield with Tyrone Wheatley the next two seasons but currently ranks 14th in all-time rushing yards. He is currently the head coach at Akron Buchtel High School in Akron, Ohio.

Other notables to wear number 12: Elvis Grbac (1988), Scott Dreisbach (1994-98), George Hoey (1966-68), Brandon Williams (1999-2002), Chris Zurbrugg (1983-87)

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#13 – Terry Richardson

Garland Rivers was an All-American in number 13 in 1986

Thirteen will be shared by walk-on quarterback Alex Swieca, but he will probably never see the field. It was most recently worn by safety Carvin Johnson and receiver Greg Mathews. The best known player to wear 13 is Garland Rivers, a defensive back from 1983-86 who started 32 games and recorded six interceptions 172 career tackles. He was a consensus All-American during the 1986 season.

Keith Bostic also wore number 13 from 1979-82. He was first team All-Big Ten in 1982 and currently ranks second in Michigan history in fumble recoveries in a season (4), fourth in career recoveries (6), and 10th in career interceptions (10).

Richardson, a four-star recruit, has a chance to make a make in the number 13 in the coming years if he sticks with it.

Other notables to wear number 13: Larry Stevens (2000-03)

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Grbac ranks in the top 3 in most Michigan QB records

#15 – James Ross

Elvis Grbac wore 15 from 1989-92. All he did was become one of the best Michigan quarterbacks of all time. By the time he graduated, he ranked first in career passing attempts (835), completions (522), passing yards (6,460), and passing touchdowns (71). Those records have since been broken, but he still ranks third in attempts, completions and yards, second in career completion percentage (62.5), and first in efficiency rating (148.1). Though he was drafted in the eighth round of the 1993 NFL Draft, he went on to have a long NFL career, earning a Super Bowl ring and one Pro Bowl selection.

Another successful Wolverine who wore 15 was Steve Breaston. The do-everything receiver ranks fifth all-time in career receptions (156) and first in career punt returns (127), punt return yards (1,599), kick returns (81), kick return yards (1,993), and return touchdowns (5).

Other notables to wear number 15: Scot Loeffler (1993-96), DeWayne Patmon (1997-2000), Bo Rather (1970-72), Frank Culver (1917)

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#19 – Devin Funchess

Remy Hamilton's game-winner vs. ND in 1994 was a huge moment for #19

Number 19 is an odd number historically for a Michigan tight end. According to the Michigan football roster database, no other tight end has worn the number. It has been worn most by kickers and receivers, most notably Mike Gillette and Remy Hamilton. Gillette has the record for most field goals in a game (5), while Hamilton owns the season record (25) as well as the record for most consecutive field goals made (14). Hamilton’s claim to fame is a game-winning 42-yard field goal to beat Notre Dame with two seconds remaining in 1994. It was his fourth field goal of the day and he went on to earn All-America honors that season.

Gillette ranks third in career field goals (57) and is tied with Garrett Rivas for most career 40-yard field goals (13). In 1986, his 34-yard field goal knocked off undefeated Iowa as time expired. He also nailed a 58-yarder against Ohio State in 1988.

Another notable Wolverine to wear number 19 was Robert Brown in 1925. He was the captain of that year’s team, which Fielding Yost called the greatest team he ever coached. He was also named All-American that season.

Other notables to wear number 19: Bob Bergeron (1981-84), Henry Fonde (1945-47), Kelvin Grady (2009-11), Dave Raimey (1960-62), Carl Ward (1964-66)

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#22 – Jarrod Wilson

Ty Law was an All-American in #22

Wilson has some big shoes to fill in the number 22, and it’s a fellow member of the secondary. Ty Law donned 22 from 1992-94 and is widely regarded as one of the best defensive backs Michigan has ever had. His six interceptions in the 1993 season rank seventh all-time and he ranks 14th in career passes broken up (19). He was a first-team All-American and two-time All-Big Ten. He went on to a long and productive NFL career before retiring in 2010. A 23rd overall selection in the 1995 NFL Draft, he won three Super Bowls, was named to the Pro Bowl five times, and was named to the NFL’s all-decade team of the 2000s.

Other notables to wear number 22: Jamar Adams (2004-07), Dennis Brown (1966-68), Ralph Clayton (1977-79), Glenn Doughty (1969-71), Darryl Stonum (2008-11), Gerald White (1983-86)

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Thom Darden was one of two All-Americans to wear #35

#35 – Joe Bolden

Thom Darden wore number 35 from 1969-71 and was a standout defensive back. He was an All-American in 1971 and first-team All-Big Ten in 1970 and ’71. He ranks sixth in career interceptions (11), second in single season interception return yards (163) and career return yards (224). He picked off two passes against Ohio State in 1971, the second of which leading to the infamous tirade by Buckeye head coach Woody Hayes. He went on to play for the Cleveland Browns where he is still the career leader in interceptions (45).

Another standout in number 35 was Don Dufek. The defensive back from 1973-75 was a first-team All-American in ’75 and his five career fumble recoveries rank seventh all-time at Michigan. He also starred in hockey for the Wolverines and was drafted to both the NFL and NHL, but chose football.

Stanley Fay donned 35 from 1931-33. The halfback and quarterback was the leading scorer for the 1932 and 33 national championship teams, as well as captain in ’33.

Other notables to wear number 35: B.J. Askew (1999-2002), Chuck Winters (1992-96)

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Jim Pace was an All-American in #43

#43 – Chris Wormley

Wormley will share number 43 with punter Will Hagerup this season. Hagerup has worn it each of the past two years. Jim Pace wore the number from 1955-57 and was a dominant running back in his time. He was named Big Ten MVP in 1957 after scoring 10 touchdowns (seven rushing, two receiving, and one on a punt return). He rushed for 164 yards, a then-record against Ohio State that season. He was also named All-American and ran track for Michigan, winning the Big Ten 60-yard indoor dash title.

An interesting player who wore number 43 was Ben McRae. He played for the Wolverines from 1959-61 and was drafted by the NFL, but is best known for his performance on the track. He was a six-time Big Ten champion and was part of Michigan’s 2010 Hall of Fame class.

Other notables to wear number 43: Corwin Brown (1988), Clint Copenhaver (1994-98), Carl Diggs (1999-2003), Clint Haslerig (1971-73), Ben McRae (1959-61), Monte Robbins (1983-87), Bryan Wright (2006-09)

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Part 2: #49 Kaleb Ringer, #50 Tom Strobel, #52 Royce Jenkins-Stone, #53 Mario Ojemudia, #56 Ondre Pipkins, #62 Blake Bars, and #67 Kyle Kalis

Part 3: #71 Ben Braden, #78 Erik Magnuson, #82 Amara Darboh, #84 A.J. Williams, #86 Jehu Chesson, #99 Matthew Godin