photo AnnArborGIFHeader_zps02670880.gif

Posts Tagged ‘Roy Roundtree’

Countdown to kickoff: 66 days

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014


Countdown to kickoff-66

New in Blue: Quarterback Messiah deWeaver

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014


Messiah DeWeaver

Messiah deWeaver – QB | 6-3, 200 | Trotwood, Ohio – Trotwood-Madison
ESPN: NR* Rivals: NR* 247: 4-star, #9 QB Scout: NR*
Other top offers: Louisville, Cincinnati, Kentucky, Bowling Green, Toledo, Western Kentucky

For the third straight week, Brady Hoke picked up a commitment, this time from Michigan pipeline south of the border. Trotwood-Madison quarterback Messiah deWeaver got an offer this morning and it turned out to be the one he was waiting for. The class of 2016 prospect committed a short time later and announced it via Twitter.

All four major recruiting services are in agreement about his height, 6’3″, but differ slightly on his weight, ranging from 198 to 202. Only one service has released its ratings and rankings for the 2016 class at this point. 247 Sports rates deWeaver four stars and ranks him the ninth-best pro-style quarterback in the class and 244th-best overall prospect.

He lead Trotwood to the state title game as a freshman in 2012 and then back again last fall as a sophomore, where the Rams fell to St. Vincent-St. Mary 24-0. In that game, deWeaver completed just 9-of-25 passes for 84 yards and three interceptions. However, in the semifinal, a 54-7 win over Clyde, deWeaver went 16-of-19 for 366 yards and six touchdowns. He finished the season with 2,265 yards, 21 touchdowns, and six rushing touchdowns. As a freshman in 2012, he threw for 831 yards, 13 touchdowns, and just four picks.

DeWeaver has hit the camp circuit heavily so far this summer, including the Michigan camp for the third straight year and Sound Mind Sound Body in Detroit last week. In addition to Michigan, he held offers from Cincinnati, Louisville, Kentucky, Bowling Green, Toledo, and Western Kentucky.

DeWeaver joins tackle Erik Swenson as the second member of the 2016 class and joins Alex Malzone (2015) as the second quarterback to commit to new offensive coordinator Doug Nussmeier. He’s just the latest in a series of recent Trotwood prospects to spurn the in-state Buckeys in favor of Michigan, including Roy Roundtree, Michael Shaw, Brandon Moore, current linebacker Mike McCray, and current defensive back Reon Dawson.

With two years of high school remaining, by the time deWeaver gets to Michigan Shane Morris will be a senior. He will then be behind Wilton Speight and Alex Malzone in terms of eligibility.

By the Gallon: Michigan 63 – Indiana 47

Sunday, October 20th, 2013


(MGoBlue.com)

Following the first loss of the season the heat was turned up on Michigan’s offense. All it did was score the most points it has scored all season, set the all-time Michigan record for total yards in a single game, and break several individual player yardage records en route to a 63-47 win over Indiana.

Devin Gardner broke Denard Robinson’s single-game yardage record with 584 total yards and John Navarre’s record for passing yards with 503. Senior receiver Jeremy Gallon shattered Roy Roundtree’s receiving record – and the Big Ten’s – with 369 yards on 14 catches.

Despite the gaudy numbers, the game wasn’t over until Fitzgerald Toussaint ran it in from 27 yards out with just over a minute remaining. Indiana answered nearly every Michigan score, utilizing a fast-paced offense to keep Michigan’s defense off balance.

Final Stats
Michigan Indiana
Score 63 47
Record 6-1 (2-1) 3-4 (1-2)
Total Yards 751 572
Net Rushing Yards 248 162
Net Passing Yards 503 410
First Downs 35 28
Turnovers 2 2
Penalties-Yards 4-15 3-20
Punts-Yards 2-73 4-146
Time of Possession 38:34 21:26
Third Down Conversions 7-of-11 8-of-14
Fourth Down Conversions 1-of-1 0-of-1
Sacks By-Yards 2-22 2-22
Field Goals 0-for-1 2-for-2
PATs 9-for-9 5-for-5
Red Zone Scores-Chances 6-of-8 4-of-4
Full Box Score

The teams traded punts to start the game, but that was about all of the defense this game would feature. Indiana got the scoring started on its second possession with a 59-yard touchdown pass from Nate Sudfeld to Cody Latimer. The Hoosiers used a quick snap to catch Michigan’s defense not set and Latimer ran right by Raymon Taylor for the long touchdown.

Michigan answered with a five-play, 56-yard scoring drive capped off by a 13-yard Gardner touchdown run. After forcing Indiana to punt, Gardner connected with Gallon for 70 yards to the IU 11-yard line. Four plays later, on 4th-and-1 from the two, Toussaint found the end zone to put Michigan ahead 14-7.

Michigan’s defense forced another Indiana punt and put together a 13-play, 60-yard drive. But it stalled when Gardner was sacked on 3rd-and-4, forcing Michigan to attempt a field goal. Brendan Gibbons’ 39-yard attempt was blocked.

Indiana still wasn’t able to get anything going, punting it back to Michigan and the Wolverines made the most of it, scoring in seven plays. Toussaint carried it in from seven yards out to give Michigan a 21-7 lead.

The Wolverines looked to be in full control of the game at this point, but Indiana responded. A 40-yard kickoff return gave IU good field position and then it took the Hoosiers just three plays to score, this time on a 33-yard pass from Sudfeld to Shane Wynn.

Michigan got the ball back with six minutes left in the half and put together a 12-play, 91-yard drive that ended with a 21-yard touchdown pass from Gardner to Gallon. It looked like Michigan would take a 28-14 lead into the locker room, but IU got a 50-yard field goal to end the half.

Michigan started the second half with the ball, but on the second play, a pitch from Gardner to Toussaing was fumbled and the Hoosiers recovered at the Michigan 5-yard line. Three plays later, the Hoosiers punched it in on a 2-yard run by Tevin Coleman to pull within four at 28-24.

On the fourth play of the ensuing possession, Gardner connected with Gallon for a 50-yard touchdown, but Indiana matched it once again, this time using an 8-play, 71-yard drive and a 5-yard pass from Sudfeld to Wynn.

Devin Gardner set a school record for passing yards and total yards in a single game (MGoBlue.com)

When it got the ball back, Michigan was forced to punt for the first time since its second possession of the game. With a chance to take the lead, Indiana marched to the Michigan 6-yard line, but Michigan’s defense stiffened in the red zone, holding the Hoosiers to a 23-yard field goal. Michigan led at this point 35-34.

On the third play of Michigan’s ensuing possession, Gardner connected with Gallon for a 70-yard gain to the Indiana 2-yard line. Two plays later, Toussaint punched it in.

It took Indiana just four plays to answer, this time scoring on a 67-yard pass from Roberson to Kofi Hughes. IU attempted a two-point conversion to tie the game, but it fell incomplete and Michigan held a 42-40 lead.

Michigan opened the fourth quarter with a six-yard touchdown run by Gardner to cap off an 8-play, 75-yard drive to go ahead by two scores. But once again, Indiana responded. Plays of 17, 20, and and 15 yards put the Hoosiers in the red zone and Roberson scampered into the end zone from 15 yards out to pull IU within two.

Michigan marched right down the field again, getting to the Indiana 2-yard line, but on 1st-and-goal, a botched snap was recovered by Indiana. With 8:34 remaining, the Hoosiers got the ball back with yet another chance to take the lead. But Michigan’s defense had other plans. After two straight six yard runs, Thomas Gordon picked off Sudfeld’s pass at the 35 and returned it 30 yards to the IU five. Three plays later, Gardner found the end zone with his legs from six yards out.

Indiana got the ball back with six minutes left, trailing 56-47 and quickly moved the ball into Michigan territory. On 1st-and-10 from the Michigan 30, Roberson launched a pass downfield, but Gordon was there again to pick it off. Six plays later, Toussaint found a hole and raced 27 yards for his fourth touchdown of the game, this time to put the game away.

The 751 yards of offense set an all-time single-game Michigan record, surpassing the 727 yards the Wolverines put up against Delaware State in 2009. It was also the second-highest in Big Ten history. Gardner’s 584 total yards were just one shy of the Big Ten record for a single game which was set by Illinois’ Dave Wilson on November 8, 1980.

The win keeps Michigan in contention for the Big Ten Legends Division title. At 6-1, the Wolverines now have a bye week to get ready for a brutal five-game stretch that starts with rival Michigan State in East Lansing on Nov. 2. The main question facing Hoke and the rest of the coaching staff over the next two weeks will be how the offense will be utilized the rest of the way, especially with the toughest defense the team will play all year looming next.

Stay tuned for more coverage and analysis of the game and a look ahead at the rest of the season.

Predicting Michigan: The wide receivers

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013


Over the past couple of weeks we have started a series in which we break down each position on the roster and predict the production from the key players. First the quarterbacks, then the offensive line, and then the running backs. Today, we take a look at the wide receiver position.

Looking Forward: A New System

Michigan’s offense is in the process of converting back to a more traditional pro-style brand of football. As we all know, the departure of Denard Robinson, one of the most unique players to ever hit the college stage, turned the offense into something that didn’t really fit into any of the specific offensive categories that coaches teach today. The big play ability and readiness to scramble made for an exciting, yet inconsistent offensive show every week.

As far as the wide receivers were concerned, they played out of their element with Denard at quarterback. Rich Rodriguez recruited small, fast receivers to run his spread offense, but when Robinson took the field, he often preferred to throw jump balls down the field. While this strategy worked out for players like Junior Hemingway, it is unrealistic to expect receivers like the 5’8″ Jeremy Gallon to win jump ball battles routinely.

That’s where Devin Gardner comes in. At the end of last season, Gallon and Drew Dileo looked more comfortable in the offense and became major contributors with a more capable passer behind the center. Michigan receivers have been pretty solid the last few seasons, despite the lack of big names that fans have grown used to like Mario Manningham, Braylon Edwards and Jason Avant.

Seniors Jeremy Gallon and Drew Dileo provide a solid foundation for the receiving corps

Roy Roundtree had a very up-and-down career, but in the end it was defined by big moments, in which he always seemed to shine. Fans will remember his catch in the first-ever Big House night game against Notre Dame in 2011 and the late jump ball against Northwestern that saved the day in 2012. Roundtree has graduated, however, and left a very young group of receivers to take his place.

Seniors: Familiar Names

Michigan has three seniors that figure to see significant playing time at wide receiver this season. Two names that all fans are familiar with are Dileo and Gallon. Dileo has turned into the do-it-all man for Coach Brady Hoke, holding for kicks, playing special teams and contributing as a slot receiver on offense. Dileo has steady hands and has shown the ability to get open by running his routes effectively. While there is no denying his size has made people second-guess him, he has found his role on the Michigan team and Hoke seems to trust him, even in big moments.

Gallon will likely be the most-targeted receiver on the team this season, if the end of 2012 is any indication. Gardner and Gallon had instant success together after the converted receiver took over the starting quarterback job. Gallon is difficult to defend because of the multiple ways he can hurt a defense. Michigan can send the speedy wide out deep, because he has the talent to outrun defenders and break a big gain, but he can also catch the ball on a screen and make defenders miss in the open field. The terrific touch on Gardner’s passes also makes Gallon a potential threat in the middle of the field. There is no denying Gallon was recruited to run in the spread offense, but the way he has adapted to the changes and become one of the top playmakers in the Big Ten is exciting for the Wolverines.

Senior Jeremy Jackson also saw playing time at receiver in 2012, playing in all 13 games but only catching four passes. Jackson is unlike his fellow seniors, listed at 6’3″. The Ann Arbor native has played in 36 games in his Michigan career, and is looking to make his first real impact during his final season. With a passing game that will probably be more efficient than it has been since Jackson arrived on campus, his numbers will get better, but he will still be a lesser option behind guys like Gallon.

The final senior, Joe Reynolds, had just three catches and played in 11 games last season. Reynolds is listed at 6’1″, and will likely play the reserve role again this season with the other seniors and young talented recruits taking up the majority of the playing time.

Projected Stats – Gallon
Receptions Yards YPC Long TD YPG
65 1,200 18.5 8 100.0
Career Stats
2012 49 829 16.9 71 4 63.8
2011 31 453 14.6 64 3 34.8
2010 4 49 12.3 20 1 4.1
Totals 84 1,331 15.8 71 8 35.0
Projected Stats – Dileo
Receptions Yards YPC Long TD YPG
35 500 14.3 4 41.6
Career Stats
2012 20 331 16.6 66 2 25.5
2011 9 121 13.4 28 2 9.3
2010 1 3 3.0 3 0 0.5
Projected Stats – Jackson
Receptions Yards YPC Long TD YPG
12 130 10.8 1 10.8
Career Stats
2012 4 31 7.8 9 0 2.4
2011 3 36 12.0 19 0 2.8
2010 4 55 13.8 22 0 5.5
Totals 11 122 11.1 22 0 3.4

Other Returners: The Unknowns

Amara Darboh is one half of the second-year receiving duo looking to make a mark

Michigan returns five other receivers that were on the roster last season along with the four 2013 seniors. Walk-on Bo Dever, redshirt sophomore Jonathan Keizer and redshirt freshman Brad Anlauf have not seen time at wide receiver for Michigan and will likely be featured mainly on special teams in 2013 due to the many other options at the disposal of Al Borges. Keizer and Anlauf are both tall wide receivers, so they may get a chance to play if they show some playmaking ability during preseason practice.

Jehu Chesson, a 2012 recruit who took a redshirt last season, has a chance to see playing time in a significant role this year. Chesson is 6’3″ and was ranked as a three-star during recruiting. His big body makes him dangerous over the middle, where he can go up and get the ball because he is lanky and athletic. Something that sets this youngster apart is his straight-line speed. He has impressed his teammates in practice with his ability to get down the field quickly and really open things up for the offense by stretching the field. Coaches have gotten more out of this receiver than they expected in practice so far, so he could be an important player in the battle for third receiver in late August.

The player that has really created some buzz out of this young group is sophomore Amara Darboh. Darboh came into Michigan as a four-star recruit, but saw very little time in 2012 and didn’t record a catch. He had his coming-out party during the spring game this offseason. Fans at the game didn’t have to wait long for some excitement, as Gardner launched a 30-yard completion down the sideline to the big receiver on the very first play. The 6’2″ Iowa native has apparently become a favorite of Al Borges with his ability to pull in every ball and use his big body to get open. Darboh has really showed few flaws in his game so far, making catches deep down the field and having no trouble getting open early by shaking defenders off the line. The sophomore seems to be a perfect complement to deep threat Jeremy Gallon on the offense, and has a great chance to win a starting job because of that. Look for Darboh to come out of the shadows and have a nice year, with Gardner taking advantage of his versatility.

Projected Stats – Darboh
Receptions Yards YPC TD YPG
20 400 20.0 4 33.3
Projected Stats – Chesson
Receptions Yards YPC TD YPG
10 90 9.0 3 7.5

Recruits: A Steady Group

Michigan’s recruiting class was full of big names and nationally-renowned players, but the wide receivers that joined the Maize and Blue were under the radar. Though the players are good additions to the roster, they will have to prove themselves to see the field on offense this season. Jaron Dukes is a big receiver and at 6’4″ has been labeled mostly as a red zone specialist. He can go up and get a jump ball in the corner and is more than willing to block, which is his specialty at this point in his career.

Csont’e York and Da’Mario Jones both join the Wolverines as 6’2″ three-star recruits. They fit the mold of the direction of the new offense, as steady receivers that catch the balls that are thrown to them. If they see the field this year, it will be because Gardner can drop the ball into their hands and the coaching staff knows they will be strong with it. Both may need work on their route-running skills, but expect the strong coaching staff to turn these receivers into contributors in the future. For 2013, however, the three freshman will likely see most of their playing time on special teams, if any.

Wrapping Up

Besides Gallon, Michigan’s receiving core is largely unproven coming into 2013. A fan base that is used to having several dominant receivers on the field at a time may have to be patient with this group. While it doesn’t figure to be one of the strengths of the team, the seniors should be dependable and Darboh could be a break-out candidate. If he is able to contribute at the level Borges seems to expect from him, the field will become much longer for Gardner and the speedy senior receivers will reap the benefits underneath.

The shift from the spread offense has given the offense an advantage of versatility at wide receiver. Michigan has a unique mix of speed and size targets for Gardner, and if Borges is able to use them to complement each other, an unheralded group of receivers could quickly become very dangerous in the Big Ten.

College football all-star games preview (Week 1)

Friday, January 18th, 2013


With the college football season over and next year’s freshmen getting ready to submit their letters of intent, the departing seniors get one last moment to shine in the winged helmet before heading to the NFL. Five Wolverines will take the field over the next two weekends along with the top seniors from around the country to give NFL scouts one more on-field look before February’s NFL Scouting Combine. Some will be looking to simply secure a draft spot. Others will be trying to improve their standing. Still others will be attempting to show they can improve their stock by switching positions. Let’s take a look at the games and the Michigan stars who will be competing in them.

Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013 | 3pm EST
Raycom All-Star Classic | Montgomery, Ala. | CBS Sports

This year marks the first Raycom All-Star Classic, which was created to give more college football seniors a chance to participate in an end-of-season all-star game. It will be held at Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Ala. and will feature the Stripes team, coached by former Atlanta Falcons head coach Dan Reeves, and the Stars team, coached by former NFL coach Jim Bates. 

Receiver Roy Rountree will suit up for the Stripes team hoping to prove to NFL scouts that he’s worthy of a draft pick. He put up a productive career at Michigan, finishing sixth in career receiving yards, just six yards behind Mario Manningham and 13 behind David Terrell. He also has some experience in stripes, catching the game-winning pass to beat Notre Dame in the Under the Lights game last season.

NFLDraftScout.com ranks Roundtree the 44th-best receiver in the Draft and the 999th overall prospect, which may not be enough to get drafted. But with a good performance on Saturday and in Michigan’s pro day or the Combine, he could prove capable of being a dependable possession receiver like former Michigan receiver Jason Avant has been for the Philadelphia Eagles. Roundtree will wear No. 89 in the game, rather than his familiar No. 21 (or 12).

Other players of note in the game are: Iowa QB James Vandenberg (Stripes), Purdue QB Robert Marve (Stripes), Alabama DLs Quinton Dial and Damion Square (Stripes), LSU WR Russell Shepard (Stars), and Notre Dame WR Robby Toma (Stars).

___________________________________________________________________________________

Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013 | 4pm EST
East-West Shrine Game | St. Petersburg, Fla. | NFL Network

The East-West Shrine Game has been in existence since 1925, benefiting the Shriners Hospitals for Children. As the longest-running college football all-star game, it typically draws a solid group of players, and 246 former players from the game are currently on NFL rosters. The East team is coached by former NFL and college coach Jerry Glanville, while the West team will be headed by former Atlanta Falcons and Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Leeman Bennett. 

Will Campbell never really lived up to the hype he arrived in Ann Arbor with, but became a senior leader this past season and helped solidify Michigan’s defensive line that entered the season full of questions. He earned All-Big Ten honorable mention honors from the media and finished his career with 63 tackles, five for loss, and three sacks.

In order to earn a draft spot, he will have to shed the bust label with a solid performance and a good showing in the NFL Combine. By all reports, he has impressed in Shrine Bowl practices. Draftinsider.net’s Tony Pauline described him as dominant and unstoppable. CBSSports.com ranks him as the 18th-best defensive tackle prospect and a late sixth-round pick. He will be wearing his usual No. 73 for the West team in the game.

Other notable players in the game include: Penn State LB Gerald Hodges (East), Purdue CB Josh Johnson (East), Iowa WR Kennan Davis (West), Western Michigan (and former Michigan) OL Dann O’Neill (West), Iowa CB Micah Hyde (West), Notre Dame S Zeke Motta (West), and Ohio State LB Nathan Williams (West).

___________________________________________________________________________________

Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013 | 9pm EST
NFLPA Collegiate Bowl | Carson, Calif. | ESPN2

The third and final bowl this Saturday has been around since 2006 under the name Texas vs. Nation Game and last year moved to California and sponsored by the National Football League Players Association. It’s a chance for some of the lesser-known seniors to perform one last time as a college player and impress NFL scouts. It also allows underclassmen entering the Draft to play. The American team will be coached by former New York Jets and Kansas City Chiefs head coach Herm Edwards, while the National team will be headed by former Philadelphia Eagles, St. Louis Rams, and Kansas City Chiefs head coach Dick Vermeil. 

Elliott Mealer earned a starting spot this season as Michigan’s center after serving as a reserve offensive lineman the previous two seasons. One of the most inspirational stories of the last few years, Mealer has been a fan favorite due to the accident that resulted in the loss of his father and girlfriend and the paralyzation (and comeback) of his brother Brock. Oh yeah, and the epic beard he grew this season.

He has a lot of work to do to garner a draft pick, given that he started only one season, but he’s a hard-worker and could wind up on an NFL roster somewhere even if he goes undrafted. NFLDraftScout.com ranks him as the 65th-best guard in the draft. He will wear No. 76 for the National team on Saturday.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Next week, we will profile the final all-star games that feature Michigan’s most well-known departing seniors, Denard Robinson and Jordan Kovacs.

South Carolina 33 – Michigan 28: Big plays doom Wolverines in Outback

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013


For the last four years, the Michigan offense, led by Denard Robinson has been a big play waiting to happen. On Tuesday afternoon, in Denard’s swan song, it was the South Carolina offense that took advantage of big play after big play to beat Michigan 33-28 in the Outback Bowl. None was bigger than a 32-yard touchdown pass from Dylan Thompson to Bruce Ellington with 11 seconds left to serve as the winning score.

South Carolina 33 – Michigan 28
Final Stats
28 Final Score 33
8-5, 6-2 Record 11-2, 6-2
355 Total Yards 426
141 Net Rushing Yards 85
214 Net Passing Yards 341
24 First Downs 17
2 Turnovers 1
4-55 Penalties – Yards 5-44
3-144 Punts – Yards 3-123
37:59 Time of Possession 22:01
8-of-19 Third Down Conversions 3-of-10
3-of-4 Fourth Down Conversions 1-of-2
3-18 Sacks By – Yards 3-22
3-for-3 Field Goals 0-for-2
1-for-1 PATs 3-for-3
5-for-5 Red Zone Scores – Chances 1-for-2

In the first quarter, it looked as if South Carolina was going to run away with the game, as Connor Shaw hit Damiere Byrd for a 56-yard touchdown on the third play of the game. Michigan answered with a 39-yard field goal two drives later. Carolina forced Michigan to punt on its next possession, but Ace Sanders returned the punt 63 yards for a touchdown to put SC ahead 14-3. It was the first punt return Michigan had allowed for a touchdown since Ohio State’s Ted Ginn in 2004.

Michigan put together a 11-play, 76-yard drive that was capped off by a 5-yard touchdown pass from Devin Gardner to Drew Dileo to bring Michigan within four. But South Carolina once again used a big play to set up a score. A 70-yard pass from Thompson to Nick Jones gave the Gamecocks a first-and-goal on the Michigan four, and on the next play, Thompson connected with Sanders for a touchdown to put SC ahead 21-10.

On South Carolina’s next possession, Mario Ojemudia forced a Kenny Miles fumble that was recovered by Jake Ryan at the SC 31. Michigan advanced to the 16, but Gardner was sacked on 3rd-and-6, forcing Michigan to kick a 40-yard field goal. On that drive, Michigan converted a fake field goal for a first down when Dileo ran seven yards on 4th-and-6. South Carolina took a 21-13 lead into the half.

Michigan went three-and-out on its first possession of the second half, and on South Carolina’s second play, Shaw rushed 64 yards to the Michigan 11. After three incompletions, the Gamecocks lined up for a 33-yard field goal and missed.

Michigan put together an 11-play drive that ended in a 52- yard field goal by Matt Wile to pull within 21-16. When South Carolina got the ball back, it faced a 4th-and-7 on the Michigan 35 and Steve Spurrier elected to go for it. The Michigan pressure forced Shaw to roll to his right, and as he tried to pump fake, the ball slipped out of his hands and went out of bounds. Michigan took over and drove 65 yards in nine plays and took the lead on a 10-yard touchdown pass from Gardner to Jeremy Gallon. The Wolverines converted a 4th-and-1 on the drive, when Gardner romped through the middle for a 19-yard gain. The two-point attempt failed and Michigan held a 22-21 lead as the fourth quarter began.

Three Michigan defenders look on as Bruce Ellington scores the winning TD with 11 seconds remaining (Al Messerschmidt, Getty Images)

South Carolina put together a 10-play drive to open the fourth, but Michigan blocked a 43-yard field goal attempt. Michigan then faced a 4th-and-4 from its own 37 and ran a fake punt that appeared to be just millimeters short. But the refs ruled it a first down, and after reviewing the play, upheld the call. On the very next play, All-American SC defensive end Jadeveon Clowney made the biggest play of the game, bolting untouched into the backfield and slamming Vincent Smith just as he received the handoff. The hit knocked Smith’s helmet into the air and the ball to the ground, and Clowney recovered, giving the Gamecocks the ball at the Michigan 31.

One play later, Shaw found Sanders for a 31- yard touchdown pass to give SC the lead once again. The two-point conversion was no good and SC led 27-22 with 8:06 remaining.

Not to be outdone, Michigan mounted a 10-play, 64-yard drive that was capped off by a 17-yard touchdown pass from Gardner to Gallon on 3rd-and-13. Once again, the two-point conversion attempt failed, and Michigan held a 28-27 lead with 3:29 to play.

South Carolina too over on its own 30, and three plays later found itself facing a 4th-and-3. But Shaw connected with Sanders for a six-yard gain to keep the drive alive. Six plays later, SC was had a 2nd-and-10 at the Michigan 32, and that’s when Thompson connected with Ellington for the winning touchdown.

Michigan’s last second comeback attempt failed when Gardner’s pass was incomplete, and South Carolina won 33-28.

Gardner finished the day 18-of-36 for 214 yards, three touchdowns, and an interception. Denard led all rushers with 23 carries for 100 yards, while Gallon caught nine passes for 145 yards and two touchdowns. As a team, Michigan gained 355 yards, but gave up 426.

Denard finished his career as the all-time FBS leader for rushing yards by a quarterback and also second in Michigan career rushing yards behind only Mike Hart. Roy Roundtree finished his career sixth in career receiving yards, just behind Mario Manningham.

Michigan falls to 20-22 all-time in bowl games and 23-8-1 all-time against SEC schools. Stay tuned for continued coverage, analysis, and a look ahead to next season in the days and weeks to come.

M&GB Staff Predictions: South Carolina

Monday, December 31st, 2012


Last time Michigan took the field, Sam was almost exactly right with his prediction of 27-21 Ohio State. The actual score was 26-21. It was Sam’s second win of the season, moving him into a tie with Chris, Josh, and Katie for second. If any one of them win this week, he or she will tie Matt for the weekly title. If not, Matt will win it outright. This is a tough one to pick because nobody really knows how Denard will be utilized and we aren’t that familiar with South Carolina. The Gamecocks are favored to win, so let’s take a look at our picks:

M&GB PREDICTION SUMMARY

____________________________

Justin: Michigan 20 – South Carolina 24

Chris: Michigan 17 - South Carolina 30

Josh: Michigan 21 – South Carolina 31

Sam: Michigan 17 – South Carolina 27

Katie: Michigan 30 – South Carolina 24

Matt: Michigan 31 – South Carolina 28

___________________________

Average: South Carolina 27 – Michigan 23

Justin (1): I’ve said it several times already, but I think Al Borges will determine who wins this game. South Carolina has a very good defense led by outstanding pass rusher Jadeveon Clowney and if Michigan’s offense is as predictable as it was in the second half of the Ohio State game, Michigan doesn’t stand a chance. I do think Michigan has the advantage of getting five weeks to prepare. Yes, both teams get that amount of time, but the way the offense changed when Denard was replaced at quarterback by Devin Gardner negates any advantage South Carolina’s defensive staff has to look at film. Nobody truly knows how Denard will be utilized and it’s up to Borges to call a great game, using Denard all over the field in a variety of packages and giving him the threat of throwing it. That’s the only way to keep South Carolina’s defense on its heels.

The Gamecocks will look to run right at Michigan and exploit J.T. Floyd’s replacement, Courtney Avery. Steve Spurrier will employ a two-quarterback attack to try to keep Michigan’s defense off balance. Connor Shaw is a dual threat, while Dylan Thompson is a more traditional passer.

It will take a flawlessly executed game by Michigan’s offense to win and I don’t see that happening. It will be a close game, but South Carolina’s defense will be too much for Michigan to execute perfectly. For more, see the First Look, this morning’s Game Preview,  Friday’s Friend vs Foe, or my Q&A with Garnet and Black Attack.

South Carolina 24 – Michigan 20

Chris (2): This bowl matchup presents an interesting matchup for the Wolverines. South Carolina started the season with stud running back Marcus Lattimore in the backfield, but he was lost to a gruesome knee injury mid-way through the year. Since then, the Gamecocks have lacked a real threat in the running game and have gone to a more wide-open spread attack with mobile QBs Connor Shaw and Dylan Thompson. For being a Steve Spurrier coached team, South Carolina doesn’t pass as much as you would think.

Connor Shaw started most of the season but will share time with Dylan Thompson on Tuesday

On the other side, Michigan has lacked a true running game all season. Other than when Denard Robinson or Devin Gardner has run the ball, Michigan has been unable to move the ball on the ground. Like South Carolina, Michigan only really throws the ball when they have to. Once Denard injured his elbow during the Nebraska game, Gardner was able to provide a spark in the passing game despite not having played the position much so far in his Michigan career.

In 2012, defenses led both of these teams. Michigan led the NCAA in total pass defense for the majority of the season but was not very good against the run. South Carolina, on the other hand, looked to have one of college football’s best total defenses early on, but they were exposed in back-to-back weeks against LSU and Florida.  Still, they are good against both the run and pass due to their overall defensive talent and speed.  They also feature an outstanding pass rush, led by a freak of a player in All-American defensive end Jadeveon Clowney.

I think Michigan is going to have their hands full in this game. Without a running game to keep the defense honest, South Carolina will be able to focus on containing Robinson and Gardner in the backfield. As long as they don’t rush too quickly upfield, they should be able to limit their ability to escape the pocket. Even if they do get out in space, South Carolina is fast enough to limit their total yardage.  I do think Michigan will be able to limit South Carolina in the passing game, but it won’t matter as that’s not the focus of the Gamecock offense. South Carolina will feature a balanced attack with a mobile QB and a lot of overall speed. While I’ll be cheering for the Wolverines, I think South Carolina wins.

South Carolina 30 – Michigan 17

Josh (2): Michigan has a chance to once again beat an SEC team. Something the rest of the Big Ten can’t seem to do lately; I’m talking to you Ohio St.

With Devin Gardner solidified as the starting QB, Michigan has gained a legit passing threat and Denard will no doubt be featured at various positions in his Wolverine finale. Just what those positions may be is yet to be determined, but rest assured he’ll be out there doing everything he can to help Michigan win another bowl game for Brady Hoke. Given Al Borges’ tendency for crappy play calling in big games recently I am not so optimistic heading into this match up. South Carolina isn’t as explosive on offense as they were with Marcus Lattimore but they aren’t anything to scoff at. However, Michigan’s defense should be able to keep the Gamecock’s offense in check giving the offense a chance to put some points on the board.

Jadeveon Clowney has been dominant all season

With the recent addition of a passing game Michigan know only needs to find its running game. With Fitz out that task rests on the shoulders of Denard Robinson, Thomas Rawls and Vincent Smith. I’m not sure who will step up, if anyone, but someone needs to help Gardner out with a rushing attack. Given what we’ve seen thus far, I’d say Denard is our only chance of having a rushing game though. If he can stay healthy and on the field, Michigan has a chance to win the game. But the Gamecock defense will be doing everything they can to hit Denard and hit him hard every time he has the ball. If Denard isn’t out there every play Michigan’s chances of winning this game drop dramatically. The Gamecock’s defense is not one you want to face with a one-dimensional offense.

The heart of that defense is what scares me (and most other teams) the most, Jadeveon Clowney. For me this game will come down to Michigan’s ability to keep Clowney from being a disruptive force as he has been all season. I just don’t see that happening. Taylor Lewan is an All-American, but I’m not so sure he’s even worthy of being an All-Big Ten lineman. I expect South Carolina to move Clowney around the defensive front to give Michigan different looks and to exploit mismatches as often as possible. Gardner and Denard are both great athletes and not prone to taking sacks, and Clowney may not rack up any sacks or TFL’s but I still think he will leave his fingerprints all over the outcome of this game.

Gardner is mobile and can definitely make plays but I just don’t see Michigan coming out of this one with a win if they cannot get the run game going as well. South Carolina’s defense is better than OSU’s, and poor play calling aside, the Buckeyes shut us down in the 2nd half of that game. The Ole Ball Coach is a wily veteran and as much as it pains me to predict a Michigan loss, that is what I am doing. I sure hope I’m wrong though!

South Carolina 31 – Michigan 21

Matt (3): What a great time of year this is. Although the end of the season always brings disappointment, knowing we won’t get that college football experience until next August, bowl games and the National Championship are always something to get excited for.

We Michigan fans haven’t had the greatest year, seeing as Michigan lost four games. Although, when you look at the losses, it’s not as bad as it seems. Losing to Alabama and Notre Dame, who are currently ranked #1 and #2 and will be meeting on January 7th in the National Championship Game, isn’t something to be too down on. The loss against Ohio State hurts, but they did go undefeated. The Nebraska loss was tough, and many feel if Devin Gardner came in instead of Russell Bellomy that it would have been a whole different ball game. But enough about that.

Dylan Thompson's great game against Clemson earned him playing time in the Outback

Michigan will be playing a New Year’s Day bowl game, the Outback Bowl, against the South Carolina Gamecocks. Another Big Ten vs SEC matchup.

If you compare ratings, these teams are similar. South Carolina gets the edge in rushing yards per game, but they are without Marcus Lattimore. The Gamecocks get the edge in passing yards per game as well, with Connor Shaw leading the team. Shaw has had an impressive year.

Michigan still has the dual-threat combination of Denard Robinson and Devin Gardner at quarterback, although we aren’t sure how Al Borges will decide to use them in the bowl game. Will they both be on the field at the same time? Or will they split snaps?

Looking at stats, South Carolina has held teams to less points compared to Michigan, but not by that many.

I think the key to Michigan gaining this victory is how Al Borges decides to play Devin Gardner and Denard Robinson. If you have both of these incredible athletes on the field, you have the defense spread thin, having to cover both men very heavily.

Both are a huge threat at any position they play, although I prefer seeing Gardner at quarterback while Robinson is at running back or receiver.

It’s going to be a tough game for the Michigan Wolverines. South Carolina plays in the SEC. We all know the SEC is a top notch conference. Their only losses were at the hands of Florida and LSU. Michigan is definitely going to have their hands full. But I see Brady Hoke, Al Borges and Greg Mattison having these guys ready. And at the end of the 4th quarter, I see Michigan winning by a small margin.

Write it down folks! Michigan wins this one, 31-28. Go Blue!

Michigan 31 – South Carolina 28

Sam (2): [Sam didn't get a chance to submit a full write-up, but submitted his score prediction].

South Carolina 27 – Michigan 17

Katie (2): The outlook for this game looks to be pretty even. South Carolina is ranked just out of the top ten, and Michigan just inside the top twenty. Their defenses are #12 and #11, respectively. As for the offensive side of the ball, neither are in the top fifty, though the Wolverines do rank in at #6 in third down conversion, while the Gamecocks are a considerably lower #43. Michigan is also #40 in rushing offense, and while their opponent can’t better that they also lost their leading rusher Marcus Lattimore to a horrific knee injury this season. Michigan however, was able to bring back their wounded star for the Ohio State game, and though Robinson won’t likely be passing he still has the potential to be lethal with his feet, and perhaps even deadlier in some type of wildcat offense alongside Devin Gardner. But the Gamecocks won’t be any pushover even against a potent Michigan backfield, as they have a formidable rush and red zone defense, and a long tally of intercepted passes that will test the Wolverines oft scoring offense.

With the defenses being on par with each other, this match-up will be about how the offenses break down the opposing side. And Michigan should look to keep South Carolina to under 21 points, as only two losses were when they scored three touchdowns or less, and because they scored 30 or more points in seven games. With an average of just over 13 yards a catch offense, Carolina will keep Michigan’s #2 pass defense on their toes. Which means that the coaches will have to know what to dial in to switch up the game plan in case their team finds itself in a rut.

Overall, it looks to be a great New Year’s day game.

Michigan 30 – Ohio State 24

Outback Bowl preview: Michigan vs South Carolina

Monday, December 31st, 2012


[I did a Q&A for the fantastic South Carolina site Garnet and Black Attack, which you can read here. You can also read their game prediction here. Hint: they don't pick Michigan.]

A month has passed since Michigan last set foot on the gridiron, yet the sour taste of defeat from that post-Thanksgiving Saturday has not escaped. Because of the rivalry nature of the game and the way it went down, it will continue to sting, but there’s one thing that can at least wash it down until next season: Gamecock.

Michigan is historically average in bowl games (20 wins in 42 appearances), but has won two of its last three and also won the last Outback Bowl it played in 10 years ago.

Raymond James Stadium  -  Tampa, Florida
1pm EST  -  ESPN
______________

South Carolina Head Coach: Steve Spurrier (8th season)
Coaching Record: 65-37 (207-77-2 overall)
Offensive Coordinator: Shawn Elliott/Steve Spurrier Jr.
Defensive Coordinator: Lorenzo Ward
Returning Starters: 11 (6 offense, 5 defense)
Last Season: 11-2 (6-2)
Last Meeting: Michigan 34 – South Carolina 3 (1985)
All-time Series: Tied 1-1
Current Streak: Michigan 1

In the grand scheme of things, this game won’t have much significance for the program, win or lose, since it’s still in the process of being rebuilt, but it goes without saying that a win would give the team some momentum heading into the offseason.

Perhaps the main thing riding on the game is Denard Robinson’s legacy. The lovable, dreadlocked highlight-reel waiting to happen will long be remembered as one of the greats to ever don the maize and blue, but can he shed the perception that he can’t win big games? To go in depth on the topic is for another story, but a great performance against a great defense on the national stage would be a fitting sendoff for the man who has given the program the face of a Michigan Man through the tumultuous times.

South Carolina will be the fourth team in the AP top 11 that Michigan has faced (would be BCS Top 10 if Ohio State were eligible). Michigan lost to the other three. The Gamecocks are statistically very similar to Michigan, but lost just two games, to LSU and Florida in back-to-back weeks in October. The Gamecocks avoided playing Alabama and Texas A&M, and played a non-conference schedule of East Carolina (8-5), UAB (3-9), Wofford (9-4 FCS), and Clemson (10-2).

When South Carolina has the ball

As we showed in our First Look, South Carolina averages about a point more than Michigan and gives up about a point less. Michigan has the better rushing game by about 45 yards per game, while South Carolina has the better passing game by about 30.

One of the most interesting aspects to watch will be how Steve Spurrier utilizes his two quarterbacks. Connor Shaw was the starter for most of the season and completed 67.3 percent of his passes for 1,732 yards, 15 touchdowns and seven interceptions. He’s also the team’s third leading rusher with 339 yards, but averages just 2.8 yards per rush, sacks removed. His 173.2 passing yards per game ranked 11th in the SEC, but he avoided making mistakes for the most part. His best game of the season came against Tennessee when he threw for 356 yards and three touchdowns. His worst game was a 9-for-20, 72-yard performance against Florida.

Ace Sanders is the main offensive threat for SC (Joe Robbins, Getty Images)

The other quarterback in the equation is sophomore Dylan Thompson who started two games, against East Carolina and the season finale against Clemson. In those two, he completed 44-of-78 passes for 640 yards, six touchdowns and just one interception. He also played considerable time against Florida, completing just 8-of-20 passes for 83 yards and an interception. He’s not the runner Shaw is, but obviously has the better arm.

Shaw is accurate when given time to throw, but will either take off or throw off balance if faced with pressure. Thompson has the ability to pick Michigan’s defense apart. Spurrier has said that both will play, but what is unclear is how much of each we will see.

The running game is average at best without Marcus Lattimore who missed the final three games of the season after tearing his ACL. Lattimore had 662 yards and 11 touchdowns, averaging 4.6 yards per carry through the first eight games, but the leading rusher now is senior Kenny Miles who has 358 yards on 3.6 yards per carry. Miles’ rushing totals in the three games he was the feature back mirrored his season ypc average, but if you remove the game against FCS Wofford, it dips to just 2.7. Freshman Mike Davis split time with Miles late in the season and averaged 4.2 yards per carry on 28 attempts.

The receivers are mostly little guys of the Jeremy Gallon variety. The most dangerous is Ace Sanders, a 5’8″, 175-pound slot man who has 36 receptions for 439 yards and seven touchdowns on the season. He’s coming off his best game, a six-catch, 119-yard performance against Clemson. Bruce Ellington (5’9″) leads the team in receptions (38) and yards (564) and also has six touchdowns. He had back-to-back 100-yard games against Tennessee and Arkansas. Lattimore had the third-most receptions on the team prior to going down, while Miles has 16, 10 of which came in the final three games. Tight end Rory Anderson is third on the team with five touchdowns, though he has caught just 13 passes, while fellow tight end Justice Cunningham has 22 receptions for 287 yards.

The offensive line is ok but not great. They are big and athletic, averaging about 320 pounds, and are built to manhandle defensive linemen. But they have allowed 35 sacks on the season and haven’t given the Gamecocks much of a rush offense once Lattimore went down. Unfortunately for Michigan, the Wolverines have recorded just 19 sacks all season and may not be able to take advantage of this weakness.

Look for Carolina to try to force Michigan to stop the run at first, to see if Michigan’s defensive line can stop an SEC rushing game. Also expect the old ball coach to let Thompson try to pick apart the Michigan secondary with an underneath passing game, getting the ball to playmakers in space. Also, expect them to test Courtney Avery often, who is filling in for the suspended J.T. Floyd.

Devin Gardner will have to be decisive with Jadeveon Clowney coming after him

When Michigan has the ball

Defensively, SC has the better rush defense and Michigan has the better pass defense and Michigan gives up an average of just one fewer total yards per game. Both defenses hold opponents to 36 percent third-down conversion rate.

All of the talk heading into the game centers around the matchup between Michigan All-American left tackle Taylor Lewan and SC’s All-American defensive end Jadeveon Clowney. Clowney led the nation 13 sacks and 21.5 tackles for loss and is already talking about contending for the Heisman Trophy next season. He’s the type of freak athlete that NFL teams will love to get their hands on when he enters the NFL Draft following the 2013 season. A lot of pressure will be on Lewan to hold him in check, which virtually no one has been able to do all season, and keep the combination of Denard Robinson and Devin Gardner upright.

But Clowney isn’t the only good player the Gamecocks have on defense. The other end, Devin Taylor, has three sacks and eight tackles for loss and is a good athlete. The interior is merely average, although Michigan’s interior offensive line is just average as well, which will negate any advantage in the interior run game.

The linebackers, led by senior middle linebacker Reggie Bowens, are solid. DeVonte Holloman is a playmaker at the Spur position and free safety D.J. Swearinger is good in run support. The rest of the secondary is made up of aggressive ball hawks that are good cover men, but tend to try to make the big play or strip the ball rather than make the tackle, which leads to extra yards.

For Michigan’s offense to have any success at all, it’s going to have to feature the creativity that Al Borges displayed in the Iowa game. Michigan isn’t going to be able to line up and run right at the Gamecocks or simply rely on Gardner dropping back to pass often. He’ll have Cloweny or Taylor in his face all day. Denard is going to have to line up all over the field and be used in several different ways, both as a playmaker and a decoy. Most importantly, Borges has to show, or at least make the defense believe that Denard can and will pass the ball anytime he has it in his hands. That wasn’t the case against Ohio State and the Buckeyes shut him down in the second half.

The other third

Rushing Attempts: 19 – Denard will pass Butch Woolfolk for 6th in career rushing attempts.
Rushing Yards: 78 – Denard will pass Anthony Thomas for 2nd in career rushing yards. With 88, he will pass West Virginia’s Pat White (2005-08) for the NCAA FBS record for career rushing yards by a quarterback.
Rushing Touchdowns: 1 – Denard will pass Mike Hart for 3rd in career rushing touchdowns.
100 rushing yards: Denard will tie Tyrone Wheatley for 3rd in career 100-yard rushing games.
Pass Completions: 17 – Denard will pass Tom Brady for 5th in career completions.
Pass Yards: 211 – Denard will pass Elvis Grbac for 3rd in career passing yards.
Receiving Yards: 8 – Roy Roundtree will pass Tai Streets for 6th in career receiving yards. With 34 he will pass Mario Manningham for 5th. With 41 he will pass David Terrell for 4th.
Field Goals: 1 – Brendan Gibbons will pass Bob Bergeron for 6th in career field goals made. With 2 he will tie Ali Haji-Sheikh for 5th.

Kicker Adam Yates made 11 of 15 attempts with a long of 51. He also had two blocked. Punter Tyler Hull averaged just 39.4 yards per punt, which ranked last in the SEC. Where the Gamecocks are dangerous is on punt returns. Ace Sanders ranks fourth nationally with an average of 14.5 yards per punt return. By comparison, Gallong averages just 5.5. Sanders returned one for a touchdown and is capable of doing so at any time. Ellington is the kick returner and is merely average at 22.2 yards per.

Prediction

The outcome of this game rests squarely on Borges and his ability to find enough offensive creativity to negate Clowney. The good thing is he had five weeks to gameplan and practice with Denard in various packages and formations, as opposed to trying to throw him in during a normal game week. Denard should be much more familiar with the offense from a variety of spots than he was against Iowa or Ohio State. I think this gives Michigan an advantage over South Carolina because the Gamecocks really don’t know how Borges will utilize Denard. It’s not like they have 12 games worth of tape to study.

There won’t be much scoring in this one and. Expect a similar score as last year’s Sugar Bowl. Borges’ offense may work well early in the game, giving Michigan hope, but it will be important to sustain it as Carolina adjusts. If Lewan and Michael Schofield can’t keep Clowney and Taylor out of the backfield, it could be a long day for Michigan.

Defensively, there likely won’t be many big plays given up as SC will run right at Michigan and dink and dunk underneath. Aside from the Lewan-Clowney matchup, the Spurrier-Greg Mattison matchup will be very intriguing as both are considere masterminds on their respective side of the ball. Will Mattison be able to adjust to a multiple quarterback offense?

Overall, it will be a close game with neither team pulling away, but short of Michigan executing flawlessly on offense, it’s hard to see the Wolverines pulling it out. Let’s hope I’m wrong.

South Carolina 24 – Michigan 20

The 2nd Annual Maize and Go Blue Awards

Monday, December 24th, 2012


In keeping with our Christmas Eve tradition, it’s time to take a look back at the Michigan football season that was and release our annual M&GB Awards.

Team 133 came in with high expectations, fresh off a resurgent 11-2 season and a Sugar Bowl victory. For the first time in years Michigan opened the season with a highly anticipated primetime game against Alabama, but it was quickly evident that still wasn’t quite “back.” After wins over Air Force and UMass, Michigan turned the ball over six times against Notre Dame, who no one thought at the time would wind up in the BCS National Championship game. Romps of Purdue and Illinois proceded a last second win over Michigan State. A Denard injury doomed the Wolverines against Nebraska the following week, but Devin Gardner stepped up to lead Michigan to wins over Minnesota, Northwestern, and Iowa. In the final game, Michigan held its own through the first half but was shut down in the second, falling to Ohio State to end the regular season at 8-4.

To most, the season was considered a disappointment, but a look back at preseason expectations shows that most thought Michigan was a 9-3 or 8-4 team. There’s still one game left to play on New Years Day, but let’s take some time to honor the players, coaches, plays, and moments that made 2012 the season it was.

Click here to revisit last year’s awards.

Harmon Player of the Year | Denard Robinson

(Ann Arbor News)

This was a tough one because there were really two deserving candidates. If Denard had been fully healthy all season, there probably wouldn’t have been much question of his worthiness as player of the year. He ended up missing two and a half games and returned in a limited role against Iowa and Ohio State. But it was what he did in the first eight games of the season that earned him the award.

Including his production in the final two games, Denard completed 53.6 percent of his passes for 1,319 yards and nine touchdowns. He also  led the team with 1,166 rushing yards and seven touchdowns, averaging 7.6 yards per carry.

Christ put it best, saying, “In a year when the Michigan offense was let down by the lack of production from anyone at the running back position, Denard picked up the slack. Without Robinson’s rushing attack early in the season, Michigan likely would have lost a couple more games.”

It can be argued that Denard’s five turnovers cost Michigan a chance to beat Notre Dame, but no one beat the Irish all season and despite Devin Gardner’s late season success, Michigan didn’t have a better quarterback option at the time.

Denard will go down in Michigan history as one of the all-time greats. He blew by Chad Henne’s total yards record and Antwaan Randle-El’s Big Ten quarterback rushing yards record, and will finish in the top 10 in Michigan history in pretty much every rushing and passing category.

“It’s hard to pick against a guy that misses 3.5 games and still records nearly 2,500 total yards and 16 touchdowns,” said Sam. “He was the heart and soul of this team for the past two seasons and will certainly be missed despite the emergence of Devin Gardner at quarterback.”

Votes: 3
Others Receiving Votes: Jordan Kovacs (2), Devin Gardner (1)

Chappuis Offensive Player of the Year | Denard Robinson & Devin Gardner (tie)

While Denard was our overall player of the year for the second straight season, he shares the offensive player of the year award with the man who took over for him under center when he was injured, Devin Gardner. Gardner began the season at receiver and made the move back to quarterback, his natural position, the week following Denard’s injury, and he started the final four games.

“Gardner selflessly moved to WR when the coaches asked him. The he made the move back to QB when he was needed,” said Josh. “He did not get targeted much as a receiver but he never complained and just did what needed to be done. His comeback to the QB position helped put Michigan in the Outback bowl, and were it not for some questionable playcalling in the second half of the OSU game it could have been a BCS bowl.”

Gardner completed 63.3 percent of his passes for 1,005 yards, eight touchdowns and just four interceptions. He also caught 16 passes for 266 yards and four touchdowns and rushed for seven more touchdowns.

As for Denard, his impact on the offense was greater throughout the entire season, giving the team a running threat when a consistent output from the running backs never materialized.

“Gardner played well during the games he started at quarterback and provided a respectable threat at receiver, but he didn’t have the impact that Robinson did for this offense,” said Chris.

Votes: 3 each
Others Receiving Votes: None

Schulz Defensive Player of the Year  | Jake Ryan

Jake Ryan led Michigan in tackles, tackles for loss, sacks, and forced fumbles

Two years ago the linebacker corps was a glaring weakness on Michigan’s defense. Enter Jake Ryan. He broke out as a redshirt freshman last season, starting 11 games and recording 37 tackles and three sacks. This year, he got even better, leading the team with 84 tackles (53 solo), 14.5 for loss, and four forced fumbles, and tying for the team lead with four sacks.

To put that in perspective, Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o, who finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting, had just 52 solo tackles, 5.5 tackles for loss, and 1.5 sacks.

“He [Ryan] seemed to be all over the field every time the defense was on the field,” said Chris. “More than doubled his total tackles from last season and was a thorn in the side of every offensive coordinator.”

He recorded double-digit tackles three times, including 11 against Air Force and Illinois, and 10 against Michigan State. In that Illinois game, he also had 3.5 tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks, and a forced fumble.

Ryan earned All-Big Ten second team honors by the media and honorable mention honors by the coaches, and prior to the Air Force game was given the honor of wearing Bennie Oosterbaan’s No. 47 Legends jersey.

Votes: 5
Others Receiving Votes: Jordan Kovacs (1)

Yost Coach of the Year | Greg Mattison

Greg Mattison has done wonders for the Michigan defense

For the second straight year, Michigan’s defense was a very good one. It led the nation in pass defense for most of the season, finishing second to Nebraska following the final week. It ranked 16th nationally in points allowed, giving up just 18.8 per game.

In Week 1, Michigan let Alabama’s offense move the ball at will, scoring 41 points. In Week 2, the Wolverines had trouble stopping Air Force’s triple option. It looked like we were in for a long season defensively. But six of the next seven opponents scored 13 points or fewer, and Michigan closed the year holding Ohio State’s high-powered offense to just 26 – 11 below their season average.

“Mattison doesn’t have a ton of talent on the defensive side of the ball but continues to turn out amazing results,” said Sam.

Despite losing two key defensive linemen in Mike Martin and Ryan Van Bergen to graduation, and top cornerback Blake Countess to a season-ending injury in Week 1, Mattison’s defense allowed just 19 more total points than it did last season (pre-bowl game).

“Continues to improve the defense year after year,” said Chris. “A Michigan pass defense which finished near the bottom of the NCAA for multiple years prior to his arrival now finished the 2012 season ranked No. 2. Mattison’s schemes keep offenses guessing all game.”

Votes: 5
Others Receiving Votes: Brady Hoke (1)

Little Brown Jug Game of the Year | Last second field goal to beat Michigan State

Brendan Gibbons hit the game-winning field goal to beat MSU (Detroit News)

After four straight losses to bitter in-state rival Michigan State, the Wolverines desperately needed to pull one out in any way possible. MSU entered just 4-3 and Michigan 4-2, and the game wasn’t even aired nationally, but the result was a good one.

Michigan didn’t score a touchdown, but Brendan Gibbons and Matt Wile combined for four field goals, the last of which was the game-winner with five seconds remaining. Gibbons connected on all three attempts from 24 yards, 21 yards, and the game-winning 38-yarder, while Wile hit a 48-yarder.

In all reality, it wasn’t that great of a game with neither offense able to do much, but that’s just how a Michigan-Michigan State game should be. It appeared as if the Spartans were going to steal a fifth straight after converting a fake punt in the fourth quarter and turning it into a field goal to take a 10-9 lead. On Michigan’s ensuing possession, Denard ran for 44 yards to put Michigan in scoring position, but a holding call negated the run and Michigan was forced to punt with just over three minutes remaining. After forcing a punt, Denard led the Wolverines into field goal range and Gibbons finished it.

It wasn’t pretty, and Michigan State finished the season just 6-6, but it snapped the streak that loomed over the state of Michigan.

“Losing to Sparty three years in a row was painful,” said Josh. “Being able to exorcise that demon and help send them to one of their worst seasons in recent memory is priceless.”

Votes: 4
Others Receiving Votes: Overtime win over Northwestern (2)

Howard Play of the Year | Roy Roundtree’s circus catch against Northwestern

Roundtree's circus catch saved Michigan from a sure loss (Ann Arbor News)

When Devin Gardner was picked off with three minutes remaining, Michigan’s hopes of beating Northwestern were all but gone. The Wildcats needed just to run out the clock. But Michigan forced a punt and took possession at its own 38 with just 18 seconds and no time outs left.

Gardner heaved the ball downfield and Roy Roundtree went up with the defender, tipped the ball in the air, fell to his knees reached back behind his body, and pulled it in as he fell to the ground. The 53-yards play put Michigan inside the 10-yard line and allowed the Wolverines to send Brendan Gibbons in to tie the game with a field goal, sending it into overtime where Michigan pulled it out.

It was one of the most improbable plays you will ever see, and at the time, it kept Michigan alive for the Big Ten Legends Division title.

“Amazing throw. Amazing catch. Enough said,” said Matt.

Roundtree also had the play of the year last season with his game-winning catch to beat Notre Dame in the Under the Lights game. Pretty fitting for the guy who donned Desmond Howard’s No. 21 Legends jersey for two seasons.

Votes: 4
Others Receiving Votes: Denard’s 63-yard touchdown run at the end of the first half against Ohio State (2)

Biakabutuka Performance of the Year | Denard’s 101% of Michigan’s offense vs Air Force

Denard scored four touchdowns against Air Force (Detroit Free Press)

After getting drubbed by Alabama in primetime in the season opener, Michigan returned home to face an Air Force team that is always up for a good fight. Michigan couldn’t afford to start the season 0-2, and with a defense that was struggling to stop the Falcons’ triple-option, the Wolverines needed a huge offensive performance. And Denard provided it.

The senior passed for 208 yards and two touchdowns and rushed for 218 yards and two more touchdowns, accounting for 101 percent of Michigan’s total offense. Michigan needed all the production Denard could provide as Fitz Toussaint gained just seven yards on eight carries. The reality is without an outstanding performance from Denard, Michigan likely would have lost this one.

“I think that 426 yards speaks pretty much for itself,” said Katie. “But then again its just Denard, we’ve come to expect the exceptional.”

Votes: 4
Others Receiving Votes: Devin Gardner’s six TDs vs Iowa (1), Jake Ryan’s 11 tackles, 3.5 TFL, 1.5 sacks, 1 FF vs Illinois (1)

Friedman Quarterback of the Year | Denard Robinson & Devin Gardner (tie)

Devin Gardner and Denard Robinson share our QB award (Ann Arbor News)

Just like the offensive player of the year award, Denard and Devin Gardner are co-winners. Denard started the first eight games of the season, led Michigan in rushing, pretty much single-handedly beat Air Force (as mentioned above), and continued his ascent up the Michigan record books. Gardner started the final four, leading Michigan to three wins and completed a higher percentage of his passes than Denard did.

While the duo wasn’t able to lead Michigan to a win over Ohio State at season’s end, the silver lining of Denard’s injury is that it gave Gardner valuable starting experience that will pay off next season when he’s the full-time starter.

“Were it not for Garnder’s performances in the last four weeks of the season Michigan might not be heading to a New Year’s day bowl game,” said Josh. “After playing receiver up until that point he stepped in and seamlessly took over the offense with poise and confidence.”

Chris wasn’t ready to give the award to Gardner, however. “Gardner can win this award next season once he plays all season at the position,” he said.

Votes: 3 each
Others Receiving Votes: None

Heston Running Back of the Year | Denard Robinson*

Denard led Michigan with 1,166 rushing yards (Detroit Free Press)

Obviously, Denard isn’t a true running back, though he did lined up at the position several times in the final two games, but he led the Wolverines in rushing by a wide margin. His 1,166 yards more than doubled Fitz Toussaint’s 514, and he did it on just 24 more attempts.

Toussaint had a breakout season a year ago, but an offseason drunk driving arrest that left him home for the season opener set him back and he never regained his 2011 form. He averaged just 4.0 yards per carry and didn’t record a single 100-yard game. The closest he got was 92 against Northwestern.

No other back was deserving, as Thomas Rawls ranked third on the team with 242 yards and no one else had more than 100.

As has been mentioned several times above, Denard provided Michigan a running game in several games when it failed to get much production from its running backs. Without his 218-yard rushing performance against Air Force, Michigan likely would have lost.

Toussaint will have the opportunity to reemerge next year when Denard graduates and the offense shifts slightly more to a pro-style set. He will need to prove he’s not a one-hit wonder.

“I can’t get myself to vote for Toussaint even though he had more yards on the season,” said Chris. “While not as talented, at least Rawls showed more heart throughout the season. Fitz has something to prove next season. Hopefully he matures a little this offseason and spends more time doing football-related activities rather than screwing around with his “friends”.

Votes: 3
Others Receiving Votes: Fitz Toussaint (1), Thomas Rawls (1), Vincent Smith (1)

Carter Receiver of the Year | Jeremy Gallon

Jeremy Gallon led Michigan in receptions and yards (MGoBlue.com)

The pint-sized slot guy was Michigan’s most consistent receiver all season. He caught at least one pass in every game and had two 100-yard games, a 107-yard performance in Week 1 against Alabama and a 133-yard performance in Week 11 against Iowa. His production picked up when Gardner took over at quarterback, as he caught 22 passes for 366 yards in the final four games compared to 18 for 318 in the first eight.

“Tiny Gallon had 12 more catches and 131 more yards than the next highest (Roundtree) to go along with the surest hands on the team,” said Sam.

The offense was much different with Gardner under center than it was the first eight games with Denard at the helm and it would be interesting to see how the receiving production would have changed if Gardner had played quarterback all season. Gallon’s receiving pace would have put him over 1,000 yards if he had the same production in the first eight games as he did in the last four. That’s pretty impressive, especially for a guy who stands 5’8″.

“Led the team in receptions and receiving yards,” said Chris. “Provided the offense with speed on the edge, not only downfield speed.”

Votes: 3
Others Receiving Votes: Devin Funchess (1), Drew Dileo (1)

Dierdorf Offensive Lineman of the Year | Taylor Lewan

Taylor Lewan was the Big Ten's best offensive lineman and a first-team All-American (MGoBlue.com)

Everybody knew Taylor Lewan was a star before the season started, but he did nothing to diminish that throughout the year. The junior was a stalwart in an offensive line that struggled following the loss of center David Molk to graduation last year. He started all 12 games and was named the Big Ten Rimington-Pace Offensive Lineman of the Year. He also garnered All-Big Ten first team honors and Walter Camp All-American honors and figures to be a high first round selection in the 2013 NFL Draft if he leaves early as most project him to do.

In addition to protecting Denard’s blind side, he also scored his first career touchdown against Northwestern when he fell on a loose ball in the end zone, becoming the first Michigan offensive lineman since 1948 to score a touchdown.

“It’s tough to bet against a First-Team All-American at left tackle,” said Sam. “There’s a reason you don’t remember seeing Lewan all that much: his defender was almost never in the play.”

Lewan will have a chance to show just how good he is on Jan. 1 when Michigan faces South Carolina in the Outback Bowl. The Gamecocks feature perhaps the best pass rusher in college football, Jadeveon Clowney who lead the SEC with 13 sacks. He’s been virtually unblockable this year and his matchup with Lewan will be a great one to watch on New Year’s Day.

Votes: 6
Others Receiving Votes: None

Messner Defensive Lineman of the Year | William Campbell

Will Campbell was named All-Big Ten honorable mention (MGoBlue.com)

William Campbell had a good season on a defensive line that was destined to perform below last season’s numbers due to the loss of Mike Martin and Ryan Van Bergen. When Campbell committed to Michigan four years ago as a five-star stud, many expected him to be the next great defensive lineman. But three years of underperforming left little hope for the big guy.

The senior stepped up as a leader and earned All-Big Ten honorable mention honors by the media. He recorded his only sack of the season against Alabama and finished the year with 44 tackles, which is 30 more than his previous high of 14 last year.

“Campbell improved significantly after this season after 3 sub-par years considering his highly-touted status as a freshmen,” said Chris. “More than tripled his tackles numbers compared to 2011.”

Votes: 3
Others Receiving Votes: Craig Roh (1), Quinton Washington (1), Frank Clark (1)

Simpkins Linebacker of the Year | Jake Ryan

Jake Ryan was an All-Big Ten second team performer this season (Ann Arbor News)

Jake Ryan had a very good redshirt sophomore campaign and positioned himself to be a dominant linebacker for the next two years. His 84 tackles (53 solo), 13.5 tackles for loss, four sacks, and four forced fumbles all led the team.

He was a constant presence in the opposing backfield and though not the quickest player, played with a reckless abandon and was a sure-handed tackler.

“The Thor/Hercules look-a-like seemed to wreak havoc on just about every quarterback and backfield this season, recording 14 tackles for loss and stopping a number of other plays dead in their tracks,” said Sam.

Votes: 4
Others Receiving Votes: Kenny Demens (2)

Woodson Defensive Back of the Year | Jordan Kovacs

Jordan Kovacs was an All-Big Ten second team selection (Detroit News)

When last year’s top defensive back, Blake Countess, went down for the year with a torn ACL in the season opener, it looked as if Michigan’s secondary was in trouble. But after being torched by Alabama, it finished the season as the nation’s second-best pass defense, allowing just 155 yards per game through the air. The leader of the secondary was unquestionably senior Jordan Kovacs.

Everybody knows his story by now, from walk-on to four-year starter and team captain. His numbers were slightly down this season compared to the previous three, but he wasn’t asked to help in run support as much as he was when Michigan’s linebackers weren’t as good. He finished the year with 65 tackles, five for loss, and two sacks.

“Kovacs was never going to be a special athlete and he’s usually good for at least one play a game that makes you shake your head in disgust, but he has a knack for the ball and is the ultimate team player,” said Sam.

Votes: 4
Others Receiving Votes: Raymon Taylor (1), Thomas Gordon (1)

Hamilton Special Teams Player of the Year | Brendan Gibbons & Dennis Norfleet (tie)

Dennis Norfleet averaged over 23 yards per kick return (Detroit Free Press)

Brendan Gibbons tied for this award last year as well, that time with returnman Jeremy Gallon. This time, he shares it with freshman Dennis Norfleet. The speedy all-purpose guy averaged 23.4 yards per kick return, and while he never took one to the house, he always seemed capable of doing so, which is something we haven’t seen in a few years. He also returned a punt 42 yards against Illinois.

“Averaged over 23 yards per kick return and provided the offense with good starting field position,” said Chris. Very explosive. Should also be the team’s primary punt returner in 2013 and see time as an all-purpose back/receiver on offense.”

Gibbons became Mr. Steady this season, connecting on 14 of 16 attempts, including the aforementioned game-winner against Michigan State with five seconds remaining and the game-tying field goal against Northwestern in the final seconds. He has made quite a progression since his freshman season in which he was relieved of his duties.

He moved into a tie for sixth in Michigan field goal history and with a solid senior year in 2013 should make it as high as fourth.

“Will Hagerup had quite a bounce-back year punting the ball, but no one was better on special teams than Gibbons, who nailed 14 of his 16 FG tries and all 44 extra points,” said Sam.

Votes: 3 each
Others Receiving Votes: None

Hart Newcomer of the Year | Devin Funchess

Devin Funchess led Michigan in touchdown receptions (Getty Images)

Devin Funchess stepped into a position of need and became an instant offensive weapon for Denard in the passing game. In just his second career game, he caught four passes for 106 yards and a touchdown against Air Force. He added another touchdown a week later against UMass and finished the season with five. He seemed to be underutilized in Michigan’s offense as his 6’5″, 229-pound frame caused mismatches for opposing linebackers, but he lacked in pass protection, which kept him off the field more than he should have been.

Still, five touchdowns from a true freshman tight end leaves a lot to be excited about for next season and beyond, especially as Michigan moves away from the spread offense and begins to use tight ends more.

“Funchess was certainly a revelation to me,” said Sam. “I knew he had some talent and I knew he was supposed to be a good athlete, but the way he started the year as an undersized freshman tight end was completely unexpected. His huge hands might as well have stick ‘em on them, because he rarely drops anything. He’s a good bet to be the best tight end in Michigan history if he continues at a solid pace.”

Votes: 6
Others Receiving Votes: None

Schembechler ‘Those Who Stay’ Senior of the Year | Denard Robinson

Denard will be remembered as one of the all-time Michigan greats (Detroit Free Press)

Denard epitomizes the Michigan Man. He came to Michigan under Rich Rodriguez, the only major college coach that would recruit him as a quarterback, and thrived in his system for two years. When Rodriguez was fired and Brady Hoke hired, Denard could have chosen to look elsewhere for a system that would better suit his abilities. But he stuck it out at Michigan and became a leader. Four years of climbing the record books took a sad turn of events when he injured his elbow against Nebraska and was forced to miss two and a half games, but he will always be remembered as one of the all-time greats to ever don the winged helmet.

“Denard Robinson will go down as one of the greatest Wolverines of all-time,” said Josh. “Say what you will about his passing ability, the kid can flat out play and is a tremendous leader. Michigan would not have made a bowl game in 2010 were it not for Denard. Michigan would not have made and won the Sugar Bowl last year were it not for Denard. And Michigan would not have been in the position they are in now were it not for Denard. He has meant so much to this team and he will be sorely missed but always remembered.”

“The first play of his career at Michigan he fumbled the snap and then ran it 37 yards for a touchdown,” said Katie. “I’d say that’s about how I would sum things up.”

Votes: 6
Others Receiving Votes: None

Harris Most Improved Player of the Year | Devin Gardner

Devin Gardner improved immensely from 2011 (Getty Images)

Entering the season, the coaching staff felt that Russell Bellomy was capable of backing up Denard, so they moved Devin Gardner to receiver full-time. He caught touchdowns in his first three games and finished the season with four. But when Denard went down with an elbow injury against Nebraska and Bellomy couldn’t get the job done in relief, Gardner was moved back to quarterback for the remainder of the season.

In four games, Gardner completed 63.3 percent of his passes for 1,005 yards, eight touchdowns, and just four interceptions. He also ran for seven touchdowns in those games. He looked poised and confident behind center and gave Michigan a passing attack that it hadn’t seen in the first eight games.

Last season, Gardner played some in relief of Denard, but never looked comfortable running the offense, and it was clear who the starter was. This season, entering the bowl game, many feel that Gardner is the better quarterback. Perhaps most importantly, he eased concerns about the quarterback position heading into next season.

“When Gardner stepped on the field last year in limited playing time, he looked lost,” said Sam. “When he stepped on the field in the spring game prior to this season, he probably couldn’t have looked any worse even if he had thrown to the defense every play. Then he became a wide receiver, and did just about as well as you could hope for in a quarterback-turned-wideout. Then Denard went down and all Gardner did was lead the team to three straight huge Big Ten wins. Needless to say, I am a lot less worried about the quarterback situation for the next couple seasons.”

Votes: 3
Others Receiving Votes: William Campbell (2), Kenny Demens (1)

* Sometime this offseason we will create a whole page for the M&GB Awards that will live on the right sidebar and explain why each award is named the way it is, as well as keep a year-by-year record of the award winners.

MMQ still doesn’t know what Borges was thinking

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012


It has been already been said by a number of people, so I won’t spend a lot of time on this. Something about losing to Ohio State doesn’t make me real interested in talking Michigan football. But I suppose it’s necessary to some degree, so here we go.

In my opinion, the Michigan coaching staff’s record against OSU is as follows: Brady Hoke and everyone except Al Borges: 1-0; Al Borges: 0-1. There is no explanation for the kind of play-calling skill (or lack thereof) that he displayed in the second half of the game on Saturday. For the first two quarters of the game, Denard Robinson and Devin Gardner played on the field together. The Michigan offense got the ball out to players on the edge and forced the OSU defense to make tackles in space. Sometimes they made the tackle. More often they didn’t, and Michigan gained an extra 4-6 yards per reception/carry. The result was 219 yards and three touchdowns.

Denard had a great first half, but was handcuffed in the second (AnnArbor.com)

In the first half, Denard as an individual was spectacular. Officially, he had 10 carries for 122 yards, including a huge touchdown right at the end of the first half which put Michigan in a position to go up by 11 points had they converted a touchdown on the first possession of the second half. The smile on my face at the thought of this must have gone from ear to ear. Even without the extra  seven points after halftime, I was still happy at the momentum that Denard had sucked from the mouths of every fan in that stadium and planted in the Michigan locker room and sideline. On the plays when Denard wasn’t touching the ball, OSU was forced to account for him, which opened up other options for the offense, such as Roy Roundtree and Jeremy Gallon.

But Al Borges, in his infinite wisdom, took Denard off the field in the second half. The result: Denard had four carries for -2 yards; Michigan offense had 60 total yards and no points. I hope, I hope, that Denard sustained an injury that I don’t know about because there is absolutely NO EXCUSE for taking the BEST PLAYER on the team off the football field. The OSU coaches and players must have been loving life at that decision.

Not only was it a horrendous call to keep Denard off the field, but once the Michigan offense started facing some adversity in the second half, Borges went back to his “I’m afraid to make a call, so I’m just going to play it safe” approach. This is called ‘playing not to lose’ and Borges has displayed this tendency in the past. Playing this way is not how you win big college football games. It is much more acceptable for a team to lose if they were aggressive in the process. Yes, maybe a kid will make a mistake once in awhile, but at least the offense is out there trying to dictate to the defense how things are going to happen.

And no, aggressive is not going for a 4th-and-2 at midfield on your first drive of the second half. That was stupidity. The head coach is the one who makes this call, so the blame falls on Hoke. The correct call was to play field position and punt the ball deep and let the defense hold the opponent to their end of the football field. It was MUCH too early for a move like that. But let’s pretend that move was actually a good call. What kind of play did Borges call? An inside run with Robinson smack dab into the strength of the OSU defense, where they have been strong all season and don’t miss tackles. Why?! Why not call something outside, where you’ve been picking up good yardage all game??  Michigan hasn’t run the ball well inside all season. So all of a sudden, in the last week of the season, against your biggest rival, an inside run is the call? That’s not how it works. That play changed everything about the game. It was never the same again. And even though Michigan still had a chance to win on the last drive of the game, they lost all of the momentum they had and never got it back.

Al Borges called a horrible second half (Melanie Maxwell, AnnArbor.com)

Some folks who are reading this may point out that it was the second half turnovers which cost Michigan the game. The players and coaches certainly, but what are they going to do, rip their offensive coordinator to the media? The turnovers were created because of the ultra-conservative play-calling which became predictable without the addition of Denard on the field. Without the defense playing on their heels and keeping an eye on the whereabouts of Denard, they were able to crash the pocket and force the offense into mistakes.

Ultimately, I didn’t expect Michigan to win the game. My prediction was 26-23 OSU. But I did think that Michigan had a good chance of coming away with a victory if they ran the offense that had been established in the Iowa game. They did this in the first half and won 21-20. They did not in the second half and lost 6-0. That’s all it took as OSU has now won eight of the last nine in the series.

One quick note on the Michigan defense: for the most part, I thought they did a good job of forcing the OSU offense into field goal opportunities instead of allowing touchdown – especially on several occasions on a short field. I said coming in that the Michigan defense was going to have to stop the run to win. On Saturday, OSU ran for a total of 207 yards. Not a recipe for victory. But I do give the defense credit for stepping up when it mattered and not giving up big points and keeping the team in the game.

I guess Michigan fans can take solace in the fact that OSU’s season is done. Their season is over and they have already begun handing in their equipment. As OSU fans gave a standing ovation to the man that put the program on probation and is the reason for which this 2012 team cannot play for any of the aforementioned honors, we don’t have to hear about a Big Ten Championship and maybe even a BCS National Championship coming to Columbus. Michigan will get an extra month of practice to improve before playing in their bowl game and another offseason to bring in a Top 10 recruiting class. The future of Michigan football is still bright and this team will be even better next season.